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Hot new 911 Targa 4 and 4S ready to order

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4
The new “entry-level” 2021 Targa 4 is one gorgeous new addition to the 911 family.

The all-new 911 (992) Coupe and Cabriolet have been with us for much of the year now, with various trims including the Carrera, Carrera S, Carrera 4, Carrera 4S and Turbo S trickling out of Porsche’s Baden-Württemberg, Stuttgart assembly plant since inception, and now that the redesigned Targa is here the 911 family is complete.

OK, GTS models have yet to arrive, but at least all 911 body styles are accounted for, until the automaker makes a Speedster variant that is. The Targa first arrived at the 1965 Frankfurt Motor Show before showing up in production trim for the 1967 model year, this first convertible 911 designed with a roll hoop behind driver and passenger to meet expected U.S. safety regulations that never materialized.

Along with the stainless steel covered roll bar, the first Targa featured a removable rear window made from plastic, this replaced with fixed rear glass window the following year, while the Targa’s roof design has been modified dramatically over the years. While the roll hoop sometimes came in black instead of silver, the first model had a removable roof panel ahead of the 1996–1998 993 model that came out with a power-sliding glass roof that automatically stowed below the rear window. The update, which carried over to the 2006–2012 997, completely overhauled the Targa’s look with sweptback C pillars and sharply angled rear quarter windows.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4
The side profile the new 992-type Targa looks very similar to the outgoing 991.

The 2016–2019 991.2 Targa said goodbye to the big powered sunroof and hello to a power-retractable hardtop-style roof mechanism that hoisted the entire rear deck lid ahead of storing the roof panel underneath. This new roof design allowed Porsche to return to the original silver roll hoop styling too, and thankfully this more technical approach continues forward into the new 2021 911 Targa. While the roof mechanism is a highly sophisticated bit of kit, it only takes 19 seconds to lower or raise, so therefore it can easily be done while waiting at a stoplight.

Everything under the new Targa’s beltline is mostly the latest 992-generation Carrera Coupe/Convertible design, which means that the new hood and lower front fascia eliminate the outgoing 911’s body-colour ovoid shapes and add straighter, more horizontal lines, highlighted by a big, black rectangular front vent that first catches the eye. This gives the new model a wider, more aggressive stance, whereas the sharply angled hood features classic tapered creases at each side of its indented centre, much like the original 911’s hood, but without the vented end. Porsche’s ovoid multi-element four-point LED headlight clusters are almost identical to the outgoing car, which will a positive to anyone still fearing the days of the much-lambasted 996.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4
With the new Targa’s arrival, all three 911 body types are accounted for.

The three vertical indentations on the new Targa’s B pillars, and the classic scripted “targa” nameplate and silver colour treatment, help 991 and 992 model profiles initially look the same. Inspecting the new car’s design more closely, however, in fact reveals front and rear fascias wrapping farther around the side bodywork, plus fractionally more upright headlights, tail lamps that extend forward much like the rear bumper vents, reworked front side marker lights, new flat-bezeled wheel cutouts, an updated set of mirror housings, special flush-mounted exterior door handles that extend outward when touched (replacing the outgoing model’s more traditionally rounded door pulls), and a smoother rear deck lid, all resulting a fresh new take on the classic 911 Targa’s design.

Those tail lamps come into clearer view when seen from behind, with the new model expanding on the outgoing 991’s slim, dagger-like LED-enhanced lenses and even narrower body-wide light strip by reach farther outward to each side, plus grafting on some 718-like 3D-like graphics at the centre lighting position, these sitting over seemingly open vent slats underneath, while carving out even an more linear design for the outer taillights.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The Targa’s interior is identical to the new Carrera’s cabin.

Just like the new Carrera, the updated Targa’s diffuser-enhanced lower rear bumper is larger, blacker, and beefier looking than previously, while it also feeds the engine’s exhaust pipes from within instead of forcing them to exit below. Additionally, hidden under the new 911’s flowing rear deck lid and just over the aforementioned light strip, which sits below a row of gloss-black engine vent strakes, is a wider and larger active spoiler boasting multiple positions depending on variable levels of rear downforce.

The new 911 Targa’s bumpers aside, all body panels are now formed out of lightweight aluminum, whereas the front fenders and underlying body structure were lightened substantially, the latter more than halving its steel content from 63 to 30 percent. The 70 percent left over is now wholly constructed from aluminum, all of which helps to improve structural rigidity, handling, and fuel-efficiency.

New standard Targa 4 wheels measure 19 inches up front and 20 inches at the rear, with the former shod in 235/40 ZR-rated performance rubber and the latter wearing a wider set of 295/35 ZRs, whereas the Targa 4S gets a staggered set of 20- and 21-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 245/35 ZR and 305/30 ZR tires respectively.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The Targa 4S boasts considerably more power and the option of a 7-speed manual gearbox.

As with the new Carreras and Turbos that arrived before, the latest Targa comes with an interior that was inspired by 911 models from the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and even the 1990s, especially regarding the wide, horizontal dash layout to the right of the traditional arcing instrument hood. The former even incorporates a narrow shelf that mimics the lower edge of the original model’s dashboard, but that’s about it when it comes to mirroring Porsche’s past 911 cabins.

The new Targa’s electronic interfaces immediately set it apart as a state-of-the-art machine, its instrument cluster mostly digital other than housing an analogue tachometer at centre. With the ignition on the new 911 Targa follows Porsche tradition thanks to a five-dial layout, although the left TFT/LCD display incorporates a conventional-style speedometer in default mode, or alternatively the car’s new advanced driver assistance systems that include adaptive cruise control, blind spot warning, lane keeping assist, etcetera, whereas the right-side screen features a multi-information display with route guidance, audio, trip, cruise control info and more.

The just-noted horizontal dash design incorporates a big 10.9-inch high-definition Porsche Communication Management (PCM) infotainment touchscreen, which is 3.9 inch larger than the previously car’s centre display. It boasts much greater depth of colour too, plus new graphics, better performance, and additional features from fewer analogue switches.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
Is the Targa for you? The classic silver roll hoop certainly adds its own element of style.

As with the previous 911 Targa, the new 2021 version will initially ship in 4 and 4S trims, while a Targa 4 GTS will arrive later. The base Targa 4 includes Porsche’s 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine that’s good for 379 horsepower and 332 lb-ft of torque. It comes mated to a standard eight-speed PDK automated transmission with steering wheel paddles (the new autobox gets one more forward gear compared to the outgoing Targa’s seven-speed PDK), which results in a scant 4.4-second sprint from zero to 100 km/h in base trim or 4.2 seconds from standstill to 100 km/h with its Sport Chrono Package upgrade.

Porsche makes a seven-speed manual transmission available when opting for the Sport Chrono Package in the new 911 Targa 4S, which when combined with this model’s more potent 443 horsepower 3.0-litre six putting out 390 lb-ft of torque only matches the less powerful Targa 4’s 4.4-second sprint to 100 km/h, this because of the base Targa’s more efficient standard PDK gearbox. This said, when the more formidable engine is synched up to the dual-clutch automated PDK it can manage a much more entertaining 3.8-second zero to 100 km/h sprint in its base trim or 3.6 seconds to the same mark with the Sport Chrono Package.

As with the new all-wheel drive Carrera 4 and 4S that launched earlier, both Targa 4 and 4S models use a unique water-cooled front differential that features reinforced clutches to increase load capacities and overall durability. When combined with standard Porsche Traction Management (PTM), the new front axle drive system improves the two Targa models’ traction in slippery situations, while also enhancing performance in dry conditions.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The partially open-top Targa is just as quick as the various Carrera models.

What’s more, all 2021 911 Targa owners will benefit from Porsche’s new standard Wet mode that gets added to the revised steering wheel-mounted drive mode selector. The new technology automatically maintains better control over wet or snow-covered road surfaces when engaged.

Each new 911 also receives standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection, plus a standard high-definition backup camera and rear parking sonar improve safety further.

Also standard, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) features electronically variable dampers with both Normal and Sport settings, while Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus), standard with the Targa 4S, is optional with the base Targa 4, and includes an electronic rear differential lock with fully variable torque distribution.

Of note, the base Targa 4’s standard brake rotors are 330 millimetres in diameter both front and rear, while featuring black-painted monobloc fixed calipers with four pistons at the front. The Targa 4S, on the other hand, gets a set of 350-mm calipers bright red painted exteriors that feature six pistons up front. The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system is also available, as are staggered front/rear 20/21-inch alloy rims.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
We’d sure love one of these parked outside our office.

The new 2021 Porsche Targa 4 is available from $136,000 (plus freight and fees), whereas the 2021 Targa 4 S starts at $154,100. To find out more about all the 2020 Carreras and 2021 Turbo models, see our 2020 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page and 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page (the 911 Targa and 2021 Carrera models will be added when Canadian-spec info is available). Here you can configure each model and trim plus add available options, research valuable rebate info, find out about manufacturer financing and leasing rates (which currently can be had from zero percent), and also access dealer invoice pricing that could easily save you thousands.

Also, be sure to browse through our complete photo gallery above, while the following four videos (Dreamcatcher is filmed in Vancouver) show the power-operated roof in its fully automated glory:

 

The new Porsche 911 Targa (1:07):

 

 

The new Porsche 911 Targa – Dreamcatcher (1:21):

 

 

Virtual world premiere: The new Porsche 911 Targa (3:53):

 

 

The 911 Targa – the timeline of a Porsche legend (2:15):

 

CarCostCanada

Porsche reveals new 394 hp 718 Cayman and Boxster GTS 4.0

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
The upcoming 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 gets similar blackened exterior trim to other GTS models. (Photo: Porsche)

It was only a couple of weeks after Porsche put out a press release announcing Canadian pricing, features and specs for their new 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T lightweight performance models, plus details about the base, S, GT4 and Spyder variants of the same updated 2020 Cayman and Boxster, and surprisingly the upcoming 2021 718 GTS was (and still is) all over the interweb.

Up until the current 2020 model year, fourth-generation Cayman and Boxster models were only available with turbocharged four-cylinder powerplants, but thanks to the new GT4 and Spyder a formidable 4.0-litre six-cylinder engine was added to the mix. Now, hot on the heels of those two top-tier 718 models, Porsche is announcing the refreshed 2021 718 Cayman GTS and 718 Boxster GTS with horizontally opposed six-cylinder power as well.

Those who follow all things Porsche will know that the brand’s GTS trim, while not necessarily the fastest in a given model line, will be one of the sportiest thanks to blacked out exterior trim and unique aero upgrades, powertrain improvements, suspension modifications, and more often than not a curb weight reduction, and the new 2021 718 GTS takes all of the above to new extremes.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
Fabulous looking 2021 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 should go as good as it looks. (Photo: Porsche)

The outgoing 718 GTS lineup, which was with us from model years 2018 to 2019, already put out an impressive 365-horsepower and 317 lb-ft of torque, but its power came from a 2.5-litre turbocharged flat-four. Sure it was 500 cubic centimetres larger than the 2.0-litre turbo-four in the 718’s base, S and T trims, while making 65 extra horsepower and 37 more lb-ft of torque, but it still wasn’t anywhere near as capable as the naturally aspirated 4.0-litre H-6 in this new GTS.

Porschephiles will already be well aware of the just-mentioned GT4 and Spyder models, particularly about their shared six-cylinder powerplant that boasts 414 horsepower, and while it’s down some 20 horsepower in this new GTS, it still makes a formidable 394 horsepower and an identical 309 pound-feet of torque.

That’s superb performance from a trim that will soon slot between both 718 T models priced at $74,400 for the coupe and $76,800 for the convertible, and the two new top-line cars that start at $110,500 for the Spyder and $113,800 for the GT4. The new engine, which revs all the way up to 7,800 rpm, makes Porsche’s renowned six-cylinder bark and therefore should appeal to the countless diehard fans of the German brand, while the melodic notes emanating from the engine compartment behind the seats get improved upon by a standard twin-tailpipe sport exhaust system.

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
The new 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 makes 394 hp from a new H-6 engine. (Photo: Porsche)

While fuel efficiency probably isn’t the first reason someone chooses a premium sports car, the new engine includes cylinder deactivation dubbed adaptive cylinder control, a technology that alternately shuts off one of its two cylinder banks under low loads, while the direct injection system uses piezo injectors plus a variable intake system to enhance efficiency further while also improving performance.

Like the sporty 718 T models that we covered in this publication in early January, the new 718 GTS adds standard performance items like a mechanical limited-slip differential, Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), and the Sport Chrono Package with a special Porsche Track Precision App featuring a lap timer.

Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package provides a handy “push-to-pass” style Sport Response button in the middle of the steering wheel-mounted rotating drive mode switch, as well as Launch Control with the optional seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK gearbox.

When using their base six-speed manual transmission, however, both new 2021 718 GTS models sprint from zero to 100 km/h in just 4.5 seconds, paring 0.1 seconds from the outgoing 718 GTS’s acceleration time, while the two only 0.1 seconds slower to 100 km/h than the ultra-hot 718 GT4 and Spyder.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
The new 718 GTS 4.0 models are filled with suede-like Alcantara surfaces. (Photo: Porsche)

Additionally, the two 718 GTS models increase their top track speeds by 3 km/h to 293 km/h—the GT4 and Spyder manage a respective 304 and 301 km/h. Porsche hasn’t announced performance numbers for the new 718 GTS with its available PDK gearbox, but the dual-clutch paddle-shift actuated transmission slices 0.2 seconds from the GT4 and Spyder’s zero to 100km/h sprint time, so we can expect something similar from the GTS.

Together with the new 718 GTS’ accelerative advantages, a bevy of standard upgrades also make for greater agility around corners, like Porsche Active Drivetrain Mounts (PADM) that integrate dynamic hard and soft transmission mounts to reduce vibration and therefore improve performance, plus the new model’s special Satin-Gloss Black-painted 20-inch alloys encircled by staggered-width 235/35 front and 265/35 rear tires make sure the new 718 models remain glued to the tarmac below.

Porsche’s Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damping system also comes standard, the technology instantly adjusting for irregular road surfaces, weather conditions, and changes to driving styles, all depending on whether Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual driving modes are selected.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
An available GTS interior package adds a red tachometer dial at centre. (Photo: Porsche)

The two 718 GTS models also get a 20-millimetre drop in suspension height when compared to lesser trims, the 718 T duo aside, lowering their centres of gravity for improved control all-round. The base cast-iron brakes are larger in diameter too, up to 350 mm in front and 33 mm at the rear, resulting in quicker stopping times. Just in case you want to slow down even faster, Porsche provides its usual upgrade to composite ceramic brakes.

In order to visually separate the new GTS models from other 718 trims, Porsche has added dark grey “GTS 4.0” decals to each door, while other styling upgrades include plenty of darkened exterior accents such as a black front lip spoiler, an all-black lower front fascia including a special Sport Design air intake, blackened front fog lamp lenses and taillights, plus a redesigned rear bumper cap and black chrome exhaust tips. Of course, we can’t forget about those glossy black 20-inch alloy wheels mentioned earlier either. 

The 718 GTS’s cabin features a GT sport steering wheel, plus a scripted “GTS” logo at the centre of the primary instrument cluster’s rev counter, while woven carbon trim highlights the instrument panel and middle console, and dark grey Alcantara provides plush grip to the steering wheel, the centre console, the gear shift knob and surrounding skirt, each door insert and all of the armrests, plus the centre panels of the standard sport seats, while each A-pillar gets wrapped in the soft suede-like material too, as does the roof liner in the hardtop coupe.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
Both this 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 and the Cayman coupe version are brilliantly fun around corners. (Photo: Porsche)

An available GTS interior package lets you choose between contrasting Carmine Red or chalk grey/beige Crayon for the tachometer gauge’s face, the seatbelts, the floor mat borders, and the cabin’s decorative stitching, including embroidered “GTS” logos on each headrest.

The Porsche Communication Management (PCM) centre touchscreen is standard as usual, measuring 7.0 inches and housing plenty of functions pulled up from lower end trims, plus of course the previously noted Track Precision App. This application originated in motorsport, and is downloadable to your Apple or Android smartphone. It provides performance-related data on the GTS’ centre display while on the track, and simultaneously records said data on your device for analysis after leaving the circuit.

The PCM also incorporates a navigation system with real-time traffic information, optional voice control, and Porsche Connect. Additionally, music aficionados will be happy to learn that an available Bose surround sound system can improve on the standard audio system, while Burmester surround sound audio takes the listening experience to an entirely new level.

You’ll be able to order the new 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 and 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 from your Porsche retailer by the summer of 2020, with deliveries following in the fall.

Until that happens, be sure to watch the videos below:

 

The all new 718 GTS 4.0. More of what you love. (1:52):

 

Porsche GTS. More of what you love. (1:30):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche reveals new 2020 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T pricing

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T
Porsche is bringing a new “T” trim line to its 718 Boxster and Cayman (shown) lineup for 2020. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche launched its enticing 718 T models to its lucky European customers last year, so now it’s time for sports car fans on our side of the pond to get up close and personal with this duo of high-speed, quick handling cars.

With a window sticker of $74,400 for the 718 Cayman T and $76,800 for the 718 Boxster T, showing an increase of $10,700 over their respective base models, the sporty new offerings slot in between the base model and S trims. The already generous 718 line also includes the even sportier GTS model, while other offerings include the track-ready Cayman GT4 and stunning Spyder.

Unlike these more powerful alternatives, the new 718 T designation means the same 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder boxer engine as the base cars gets fitted midships. It makes 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque, which is plenty for the lightweight coupe and convertible, but a short-throw shifter gets thrown into the mix of six-speed manual cars too, plus a mechanically locking differential and Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), whereas seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK models get the Sport Chrono Package standard, resulting in 0.2 seconds lopped off its zero to 100 km/h time, and that’s from a car already good for shaving 0.2 seconds off the manual’s straight-line acceleration time.

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T
A 20-mm lower suspension and other upgrades makes the new 718 T models sportier than their base siblings. (Photo: Porsche)

The Sport Chrono Package includes Launch Control too, as well as a “push-to-pass” style Sport Response button in the centre of the steering wheel-mounted driving mode switch, making PDK the way to go if you want to move fastest with the least amount of hassle.

T stands for “Touring” in Porsche-speak, however, which according to a January 7, 2020 press release provides “driving pleasure in its purest form,” adding “the 718 T will be most at home on winding country roads,” so possibly the manual should be higher on your priority list?

Being that the new T models utilize the same powertrains as their base counterparts, their acceleration times are identical at zero to 100 km/h in 5.1 seconds apiece for manual-equipped cars and 4.9 to 4.7 seconds for PDK models, while all feature top track speeds of 275 km/h.

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
Plenty of interior updates are included, but don’t let the missing infotainment system worry you as PCM comes standard here. (Photo: Porsche)

This said the big 718 T updates impact handling, with key enhancements including Porsche Active Drivetrain Mounts (PADM) that feature dynamic hard and soft gearbox mounts for reduced vibration and improved performance, as well as a sport exhaust system, high-gloss titanium grey-painted 20-inch five-spoke alloy rims, and the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damping system (a first for the base turbocharged four-cylinder engine) that, depending on the Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual driving mode chosen, makes instant adjustments for road conditions and driving style changes. All items just listed roll on a 20-millimetre lower ride height, resulting in a lower centre of gravity and therefore better control.

A grey side striping package with “718 Cayman T” or “718 Boxster T” script adds visual impact, as do Agate grey-painted mirror housings designed to match the alloys, while a set of black chrome tailpipes finish off changes to the back end.

Seated inside, a GT sport steering wheel will be close at hand, while scripted “Cayman T” or “Boxster T” logos highlight the black instrument dials just ahead. The 718 T interiors will also feature gloss black instrument panel inlays and centre console trim, red paint for the gear shift pattern atop the shift knob, two-way powered seats, seat upholstery incorporating black Sport-Tex centre sections, embroidered “718” logos on the headrests, and most identifiably of all, black mesh fabric door pulls in place of the usual inner door handles, which can be changed for available coloured pulls.

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
These door pulls replace the regular door handles. (Photo: Porsche)

When eyeing up the interior you may also notice their Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreens missing from both cars’ instrument panels, which were removed to reduce weight in European models. Due to a regulation that made backup cameras mandatory as of May 2018, this won’t be the case for Canadian-spec 718 T models, but instead it will receive an identical high-resolution infotainment display to the one found in today’s 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster.

Finally, for your personalization pleasure, the new 718 T models can be painted in plenty of colours including standard Black, Guards Red, Racing Yellow, and White, optional Carrara White, Jet Black and GT Silver metallics, with the special colours being Lava Orange and Miami Blue.

The new 2020 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T can be ordered from your local Porsche dealer now, with deliveries arriving this coming summer.

Until then, check out the videos below:

 
The new Porsche 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T. Welcome to life. (1:17):

 

The new Porsche 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T. First Driving Footage. (1:49):

 

JP Performance Test Drive: The Porsche 718 T Models. (1:08):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press

Photo credits: Porsche

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2020 Porsche 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 now available to order

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Thanks to 414-hp and plenty of performance upgrades the new 2020 718 Cayman GT4 is the most capable of its kind yet. (Photo: Porsche)

Decades ago Porsche was criticized for not making entry-level models that measured up to the much mightier 911, examples being the now 50-year-old ‘69-‘76 mid-engine 914 and ‘76–‘88 front-engine 924, but since the mid-engine Boxster convertible and Cayman coupe arrived on the scene, complainants haven’t been anywhere near as vocal. 

Just the same, the brand’s new line of turbocharged flat-four powerplants that arrived in the current fourth-gen 718 series models have had their share of naysayers, yet while these engines’ barks aren’t quite as vicious sounding as the flat-six 911’s meatier growl, the 2.5-litre mill’s bite has kept most critics silent, particularly when tuned to GTS heights. 

With respect to the 986, 987, 981 and today’s 982 platform architectures, the Cayman and Boxster were near perfect performers from the very beginning thanks to their relatively light curb weights and inherently well-balanced mid-engine layouts, and every generation became even better at managing high-speed road and racetrack performance. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
Choose the 718 Spyder if going topless in the quickest and most stylish Boxster ever is more to your liking. (Photo: Porsche)

As with the previous-gen Boxster and Cayman, the 718 series’ many more fans should also be happy to know that 2020 models are about to be built in their most formidable production trims yet, the upcoming 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 even capable of sprinting away from and outmaneuvering some 911 models. 

To fill you in on some background information, the 718 Cayman (currently on sale from $63,700), can be had in base 300-horsepower Cayman trim that’s capable of zero to 100km/h in just 5.1 seconds, or 4.9 seconds when hooked up to its optional paddle shift-operated dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission, or a speedy 4.7 seconds with the PDK and the car’s available Sport Chrono Package, while if you keep its right pedal planted it can hit a top track speed of 275 km/h. 

The entry-level coupe can also be upgraded to 350-horsepower Cayman S trim ($78,600), which can spirit away from standstill to 100km/h in only 4.6, 4.4 and 4.2 seconds respectively, plus it tops out at an even higher 285 km/h, while lastly the 365-horsepower Cayman GTS ($92,600) is capable of running from 0 to 100km/h in 4.6, 4.3 and 4.1 seconds respectively, while it claims a top speed of 290 km/h. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
The 718 Cayman GT4 has a massive rear wing. (Photo: Porsche)

The just-noted 718 Cayman GT4 arrives at the top of this pecking order, just like the previous version did when introduced in 2015. Where the old Cayenne (and Boxster) had flat-six engines throughout its range, the new GT4 replaces the 718’s 2.0- and 2.5-litre turbocharged flat-four engines with a downgraded (but still amazing) version of the wonderfully high-revving naturally-aspirated 4.0-litre H-6 from the 911 GT3, producing a generous 414-horsepower and 309 lb-ft of torque, which is a 29-hp bump over the previous GT4 due in part to a sonorous 8,000-rpm redline, while it’s solely conjoined to a six-speed manual transmission just like the 911 GT3, all combining for a zero to 100km/h sprint time of 4.4 seconds, plus a terminal velocity of 304 km/h. 

As for the 718 Spyder, which also updates a previous 2016 model, it shares all of the same mechanical bits as the Cayman GT4. This means it’s 39 hp more potent than the outgoing Spyder, resulting in the same 4.4-second 100-km/h sprint time as the Cayman GT4, although its top speed is fractionally lower at 301 km/h. Unlike the GT4, mind you, the open-top Spyder is quite different than the model using the Boxster nameplate, despite housed in its basic tub. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
The 718 Spyder gets two “streamliners” on its backside as well as an auto-deploying spoiler. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the two new cars’ utilize a six-speed manual gearbox, which isn’t all that unusual in the class, but interestingly this transmission includes downshift rev-matching, or rather what Porsche refers to as an “Auto Blip” function, which automatically matches a given cog to engine speed when dropping a gear. Fortunately, Porsche makes this feature optional, in that a driver can individually activate or defeat it via a button. Also standard, both new models feature a totally new and exclusively designed sport exhaust system that works its way around the cars’ complex rear diffusers while making the most of the “exciting flat-six sound of the engine,” noted Porsche in its press release. 

With respect to the two models’ outward designs, some key elements of the 718 Spyder appear like they were pulled from the 918 Spyder, not to mention the more recently introduced 911 Speedster. The 918 may have helped to inspire the 718 Spyder’s lower front fascia and similar, albeit much more pronounced, double-hump rear deck lid buttresses, while the new 911 Speedster may have influenced the 718 Spyder’s aggressive frontal treatment and double-bubble rear deck “streamliners”, as well as the new convertible’s vented hood, the “Spyder” lettering on its shortened B-pillars (which read “Speedster” on the 911), the similarly sculpted automatically-deploying rear spoiler, and the working rear diffuser. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Aerodynamics play a key role with both new 718 cars. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 718 Cayman GT4, on the other hand, pulls forward a number of similar styling cues and aero details from its 2016 predecessor, including the aggressively shaped front fascia, the horizontal black strip of hood venting, the large fixed rear wing, the wind-cheating rear diffuser, and the uniquely designed alloys, all developed with a focus on minimizing weight and maximizing downforce. The fact Porsche even painted both GT4 launch cars in a seemingly identical yellow hue is no coincidence either, just like they once again coated the latest 718 Spyder launch model in white. 

With an eye looking back to aerodynamics, each and every 718 Cayman GT4 exterior upgrade combines for 50 percent greater downforce with no negative affects on drag. Most of the aero advantages can be attributed to the new diffuser and rear wing elements, the latter feature good for 20-percent greater aero-efficiency than the outgoing GT4 wing. At the other end of the car, a deep lip spoiler joins up with air curtains to each side, this helping to channel air around the front wheels. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
Both models get unique interior trims, including plenty of soft Alcantara psuede. (Photo: Porsche)

Now with our focus on the 718 Spyder’s aero upgrades, its adaptive rear wing automatically powers upwards at 120 km/h, but unlike the conventional 718 Boxster’s retractable fabric roof, the Spyder’s top doesn’t benefit from electrical assistance, but instead requires manual removal and stowage below the rear deck cover. When replaced on top of the passenger compartment, Porsche promises a roof that can manage the Spyder’s high top speed without issue, providing full protection from wind, rain and more. 

Behind the scenes, both new models integrate a lightweight, high-performance chassis design that’s capable of keeping the engine and aero capabilities in check. Porsche leaned on its extensive motorsport heritage in order to achieve an ideal balance for the new Spyder and GT4, choosing to equip both with a model-exclusive rear axle, and a front axle adopted from the 2018 911 GT3. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Form-fitting sport seats come standard. (Photo: Porsche)

Additional standard features include Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), providing a 30-millimetre ride-height reduction when compared to regular 718 models, this lowering the new models’ centre of gravity, thus improving overall handling. Still, owners have the ability to manually adjust the suspensions’ camber, toe, ride-height and anti-roll bar settings, important for those who regularly hone their skills on the track. 

The now legendary 911 GT3 also provided the two new models’ braking setup, including their larger 380-mm cast iron rotors and fixed aluminum calipers, while buyers of either car can choose to upgrade to a set of ceramic composite brakes if desired, these 50-percent lighter and featuring discs that measure 410 mm up front and 390 mm in the rear. Additionally, the 718 Spyder and Cayman GT4 feature specially tuned ABS, electronic stability control (ESC) and traction control (TC) systems that enhance the cars’ performance, with these ESC and TC systems capable of being switched off via a two-stage process. 

Yet more upgrades include a standard mechanical limited-slip differential with Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), plus unique 20-inch alloy rims shod with 245/35ZR20 front and 295/30ZR20 rear UHP rubber. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
The 414-hp flat-six gets an exclusive sport exhaust system. (Photo: Porsche)

As you may have noticed, the many performance upgrades mentioned up to this point don’t necessarily make the new 718 Spyder or 718 Cayman GT4 quicker off the line than GTS versions of either model, but both are faster on the track, and therefore should be better for everyday driving, at least when pushing the limits. With respect to racetrack limits, Porsche claims its new 718 Cayman GT4 is capable of lapping the Nürburgring Nordschleife “more than ten seconds faster than its predecessor.” 

Making the two new models more enjoyable to live with are upgraded interiors that include a special 360-mm GT Sport steering wheel with a cool yellow top-centre “marker” in Cayman GT4 trim. Additionally, both 718 Spyder and Cayman GT4 receive a 20-mm shorter shift lever that provides a “more direct and crisp feel” when changing gears. What’s more, a new Sport Seats Plus package comes standard, boasting seats with larger side bolsters to enhance lateral support, plus suede-like Alcantara inserts to improve backside grip. Alcantara also gets applied to a lower portion of the instrument panel, as well as the shift knob and boot, and the previously mentioned steering wheel rim. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Porsche offers plenty of upgrades, including multi-colour interior accents. (Photo: Porsche)

On top of this, some cabin accents include body-colour trim for the 718 Spyder, and brushed aluminum details for the 718 Cayman GT4, while Porsche offers plenty of available décor upgrades as well. What’s more, you can opt for a set of full bucket seats or an 18-way power-adjustable Adaptive Sport Seats Plus package, but take note you won’t be required to pay more for air conditioning or the brand’s newest Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system that also features Sound Package Plus. This said, a navigation system and Porsche Connect, featuring Apple CarPlay, are optional. 

Also noteworthy, the 718 Spyder can be ordered with a Spyder Classic Interior Package that includes two-tone Bordeaux Red and Black leather upholstery, extended Alcantara, GT silver metallic interior trim, and a two-tone black and red fabric top, the latter “reminiscent of historic Porsche racing cars” says Porsche. Alternatively, red, silver, or yellow contrast stitching is available. 

However you’d like to order yours, I wouldn’t recommend waiting too long as Canada’s allotment will soon be spoken for. They’re currently available to order, with pricing beginning at $110,500 for the 718 Spyder, and $113,800 for the 718 Cayman GT4, plus a freight charge and other fees of course. 

While you’re waiting for your new 2020 718 Spyder or 718 Cayman GT4 to arrive, make sure to check out all the videos Porsche provided below: 

The new Porsche 718 Spyder. Perfectly irrational. (1:03):

The new Porsche 718 Spyder. Product highlights. (2:25):

The new Porsche 718 Cayman GT4. Product highlights. (2:13):

The new Porsche 718 GT4. Perfectly irrational. (1:01):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

New 911 Speedster pays tribute to Porsche’s storied motorsport past

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The new 911 Speedster has a very unique look from up front. (Photo: Porsche)

Last year, Porsche celebrated its 70th anniversary by producing the one-off 911 Speedster Concept, a beautiful modernization of its first-ever model, the 356 ‘No. 1’ Roadster from 1948. This sent the motoring press and many fans of the brand into an uproar about future production, resulting in the 2019 911 Speedster seen here. 

The Speedster is now available to order from you local Porsche retailer for just $312,500, a mere $149,200 more than the 911 GT3 Coupe that it’s based on. And yes, that means the all-new Speedster rides on outgoing 991 hardware, not the upcoming 2020 911 (992) that’s been top of the news headlines lately. 

We’re guessing the exclusive club of 1,948 buyers receiving their limited edition Speedsters toward the end of 2019 won’t care one whit about which chassis it rides on, chiefly because the Speedster is gorgeous and 991 underpinnings have been arguably Porsche’s best yet, at least when uprated to GT3 or GT2 guise. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The 911 Speedster’s rear design is even more distinct, the model shown here with its special Heritage Package. (Photo: Porsche)

Also notable, the renewed GT3 Coupe won’t arrive in 992 form for quite some time, and therefore the only way you’re going to get your hands on a 500-plus horsepower 4.0-litre flat-six crammed aft of the rear axle, capable of a screaming 9,000-rpm redline and generous 346 lb-ft of torque, is to opt for a current GT3 or choose the instantly collectable 911 Speedster, the newer model in fact good for a minor increase to 502 horsepower thanks to throttle bodies added from the GT3 R race car. 

The results of all this go-fast tech is a 4.0-second run from zero to 100km/h, which is just 0.1 seconds off the GT3’s pace, while its terminal velocity is 310 km/h, a mere 10 km/h slower than the GT3, despite not having its massive rear wing. 

What’s more, when you factor in that the Speedster only provides Porsche’s GT Sport six-speed manual transmission, which is also pulled from the GT3 and shaves four kilos from the seven-speed manual used for the regular 911, that standstill sprint to 100km/h score is even more amazing, because Porsche’s paddle shift-actuated dual-clutch PDK automated transmission is always quicker. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The Speedster includes a six-speed manual gearbox from the GT3. (Photo: Porsche)

Together with the GT3 powertrain, which comes with dynamic engine mounts from the GT3 by the way, the Speedster utilizes the supercar-beating model’s uprated chassis that incorporates a uniquely calibrated rear axle steering system, although this is where similarities between the two Porsche models end, because body mods are so significant that it’s hard to tell whether the two cars have much of anything in common. These include lower cut front and side windows, twin “streamliners” shaped from carbon fibre on the rear deck, these completely consuming the rear seating area, carbon fibre composite front fenders and hood, front and rear fascias formed from polyurethane, plus a lightweight manual fabric top. 

It was smart for Porsche to upgrade the roof for easier day-to-day usability, as the concept only featured a button-down tonneau cover that would’ve caused nothing but aggravation to its potential owners, while the automaker also deleted the “X” markings on the headlamp lenses that stylistically reminded history buffs about the tape once used to make sure broken glass didn’t end up on the racetrack to puncture tires; the removal of the 1950s-type aluminum fuel filler cap on the concept’s hood for fast refueling of the gas tank below; plus replacement of the Talbot mirror housings that were popular back when the 356 was around, to stock side mirrors. 

Fans of that now highly collectible classic 356 will no doubt be happy that Porsche left the gold-coloured “Speedster” lettering on the thick B-pillars and rear engine cover unmolested, but this said you’ll need to add a special upgrade package (see below) to get them. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The regular Speedster gets a modern look… (Photo: Porsche)

All the carbon fibre mentioned earlier should make it clear that Porsche wanted its Speedster to be as light as possible, with the premium brand even going so far as to delete the stereo and air conditioning in base trim (they’re optional), but with a focus on performance they added a standard set of beefed up, lighter weight carbon ceramic brakes, boasting bright yellow six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers in the front and four-piston aluminium monobloc fixed calipers at back, these slicing a whopping 50 percent of weight from the regular 911’s cast iron rotors. Ringing those brakes are centre-lock Satin Black-painted 20-inch alloy wheels on Ultra High Performance (UHP) tires, aiding grip even further. 

Looking inside, the Speedster includes lighter weight door panels with storage nets and door pulls, plus the standard black leather can be improved with red stitching on the instrument panel and headrests with embroidered “Speedster” lettering. The door pulls come in red with the upgrade, while Porsche adds a unique GT Sport steering wheel infused with a red centre marker at the 12 o’clock marker. The Speedster interior also features a beautiful carbon fibre shift knob, and carbon fibre doorsill kick plates with “Speedster” monikers. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
While the Heritage Package more classic touches. (Photo: Porsche)

Those attracted to the new 911 Speedster for its classic proportions and design can opt for a special Heritage Design Package that comes much closer to last year’s concept and ‘50s-era 356 Speedsters. The upgrade adds white front bumper and fender “arrows” on top of GT Silver Metallic paint, while this is how you get the aforementioned gold Speedster lettering too, plus classic Porsche crests. Also, the door-mounted racing-style number stickers can be removed if you don’t like them, but then again if you choose to keep them you can also include your own personal number. Lastly, the upgraded Heritage interior gets two-tone leather with classic Porsche crests sewn onto the headrests, plus body-colour trim gets added to the dash and seatbacks. 

If the new 911 Speedster sounds like your kind of car, be sure to call your local Porsche dealer quickly, and while you’re waiting for delivery of this ultimate drop-top, enjoy a couple of videos below:
 
 
The new Porsche 911 Speedster: First Driving Footage (1:13):
 

 
The new Porsche 911 Speedster: Highlight Film (2:10):
 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible Road Test

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The new Jaguar F-Type P300 is nearly $10,000 more affordable than the base F-Type in 2017. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Most will agree that Jaguar’s F-Type is one of the most beautiful sports cars to come along in decades, and this sentiment would be reason enough to make it one of the most popular cars in its class, which it is. Yet there’s a lot more to the F-Type’s success than jaw-dropping bodywork, from its lightweight aluminum construction that aids performance, supported by a wide variety of potent powertrain options, to its high quality luxuriously appointed interior, there are few cars that come close to matching the F-Type’s styling, capability or value. 

Yes, it might seem strange to be talking value with respect to a near-exotic sports car, but the F-Type, already an excellent buy throughout its initial four years of availability, became an even better deal since Jaguar installed its new in-house Ingenium 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine under its long, elegant hood for the 2018 model year. While the formidable turbocharged and direct-injected engine makes a very healthy 296 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque, it provides a considerable economical edge over its V6- and V8-powered counterparts and all rivals, while a significantly reduced base price of $68,500 didn’t hurt matters either. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Still drop-dead gorgeous after all these years. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Last year’s starting point represented a $10k advantage over the F-Type’s previous base price, which resulted in a much more attainable point of entry and a whole new opportunity for Jaguar. In fact, the new F-Type P300 Coupe and Convertible instantly became prime 718 Cayman and Boxster competitors, whereas pricier more powerful F-Type trims, which include the 340 horsepower supercharged 3.0-litre V6 in base form, 380 horsepower supercharged 3.0-litre V6 with both base and R-Dynamic cars, 550 horsepower supercharged 5.0-litre V8 in R guise, and 575 horsepower version of the latter V8 in top-tier SVR trim for 2019, plus rear or all-wheel drive and six-speed manual or quick-shifting paddle-shift actuated eight-speed automatic transmissions, continue to fight it out with the Porsche 911 and others in the premium sports car segment, including plenty that cost hundreds of thousands more. 

The car in question in this review, however, is the 2019 F-Type P300, which starts at $69,500 in Coupe form and $72,500 as a Convertible this year. With close to 300 horsepower of lightweight turbocharged four-cylinder cradled between the front struts it should provide more than enough performance for plenty of sports car enthusiasts, especially when considering that key competitors like Audi, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Alfa Romeo don’t offer anywhere near as much output from their entry-level four-cylinder sports models, with 220 horsepower for the TT, 241 for the SLC, 241 for the (2018) Z4, and 237 for the 4C, while F-Type P300 numbers line up right alongside Porsche’s dynamic duo that are good for 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque apiece. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The LED headlights are standard, but the 20-inch glossy black alloys are optional. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

If you’re wondering whether the F-Type P300’s performance will match your need for speed, it can zip from zero to 100km/h in just 5.7 seconds before attaining a top speed of 250 km/h (155 mph), and it feels even quicker with Dynamic sport mode engaged and its available active sport exhaust turned on. Jaguar makes its eight-speed Quickshift automatic standard in this rear-wheel driven model, and the steering wheel paddle assisted gearbox delivers super-fast shift intervals that combine with the brilliantly agile chassis to produce a wonderfully engaging seat-of-the-pants driving experience. 

The agile chassis just noted refers to a mostly aluminum suspension mounted to the bonded and riveted aluminum body structure noted at the beginning of this review, a lightweight and ultra-rigid construct that certainly isn’t the least expensive way to build a car, but results in satisfyingly capable handling no matter the corner the F-Type is being flung into. The stiffness of the monocoque allows Jaguar to dial out some of the suspension firmness that competitors are stuck with in order to manage similar cornering speeds, which allows this little two-seater to be as comfortable over uneven pavement as it’s enjoyable to drive fast. Specific to the P300, less mass over the front wheels from the mid-mounted four-cylinder aids steering ease and potential understeer, making this one of the best balanced sports cars I’ve driven in a very long time. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The classic styling of a soft-top suits the F-Type ideally, and this roof’s quality is impressive. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

My tester’s $2,550 optional Pirelli P-Zero ZR20s on glossy black split-spoke alloys certainly didn’t hurt matters, hooking up effortlessly after just that little bit of slip only a rear-wheel drivetrain can deliver when pushed hard through hairpins. What an absolute delight this car is. 

I love that it’s so quick when called up yet so effortlessly enjoyable to drive at all other times too. Even around town, where something more exotic can be downright tiresome, the F-Type is totally content to whisk driver and passenger away in quiet comfort. It helps that its interior is finished so nicely, with soft-touch high-grade synthetic or leather surfacing most everywhere that’s not covered in something even nicer, the cabin accented in elegant satin-finish aluminum and sporty red contrast stitching throughout. 

The Windsor leather covered driver’s seat is multi-adjustable and plenty supportive too, while the leather-wrapped multi-function sport steering wheel provided enough rake and reach to ideally fit my long-legged, short-torso five-foot-eight frame resulting in an ideal driving position that maximizes comfort and control. I’m sure larger, taller folk would fit in just fine as well, thanks to plenty of fore and aft travel plus ample headroom when the tri-layer Thinsulate filled fabric top is powered into place, a process that takes just 12 seconds at speeds of up to 50 km/h no matter whether raising or lowering. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Fit, finish and Jaguar’s choice of materials set the F-Pace apart from many competitors. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Doing the latter doesn’t infringe on trunk space, incidentally, which measures 200 litres (7.0 cubic feet) and is a bit awkward in layout. If you want more I’d recommend the F-Type Coupe that has one of the largest cargo compartments in the luxury sports car class at 308 litres (10.9 cu ft) with the cargo cover in place and 408 litres (14.4 cu ft) with it removed. 

Back in the driver’s seat, Jaguar provides a classic dual-dial analogue gauge cluster centered by a sizeable colour TFT multi-information display, which while not as advanced as some fully digital driver displays on the market is probably more appropriate for a sports car that focuses on performance. 

The big change for 2019 was the addition of a 10-inch Touch Pro infotainment display, which replaces the 8.0-inch centre touchscreen used previously. Its larger size makes for a more modern look, while it’s certainly easier to make out obstacles on the reverse camera. The larger screen benefits all functions, with the navigation system’s map more appealing and easier to pinch and swipe, and only the home menu’s quadrant of quick-access feature not making use of all the available space (a larger photo of the classic red British phone booth would be nice). 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The mostly analogue gauge cluster gets this particularly well designed multi-information display at centre. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The standard audio system is from Meridian and makes 380 watts for very good sound quality, while additional standard features include pushbutton ignition, an electromechanical parking brake, automatic climate control, powered seats, and leather upholstery on the inside, plus 18-inch alloys, LED headlights with LED signature lighting, rear parking sensors, a powered retractable rear spoiler, and more on the outside. 

The Windsor leather and contrast stitching noted earlier came as part of a $2,250 interior upgrade package that improves the upholstery overtop special performance seats while finishing the top of the instrument panel, console and door trim in the same Windsor leather for a thoroughly luxurious experience, while my tester’s heated steering wheel and heated seat cushions come as part of a $1,530 Climate pack, with an extra $300 adding ventilated seats to the mix if you prefer, while Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration was added for an additional $300. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The new standard 10-inch infotainment display makes the backup camera better than ever. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, proximity-sensing keyless access made entering and exiting more convenient for $620, heatable auto-dimming side mirrors with memory made nighttime travel easier on the eyes for just $210, as did automatic high beams for oncoming traffic at $260, whereas blind spot assist might have definitely proved worthwhile at $500, as would front parking sensors at $290, while the aforementioned switchable active exhaust system was well worth the investment for another $260. 

Incidentally, all prices were sourced right here at CarCostCanada, where you’ll find pricing on trims, packages and individual options down to the minutest detail, plus otherwise hard to find manufacturer rebate information as well as dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when negotiating your deal. 

At the risk of this sports car review becoming terminally practical, the F-Type P300’s fuel economy is so good it deserves mention too, with both Coupe and as-tested Convertible achieving a claimed 10.2 L/100km in the city, 7.8 on the highway and 9.2 combined, which beats all Porsche 718 and 911 variants by a long shot, not to mention hybrid sports cars like Acura’s new NSX. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
We recommend spending a little more on these performance seats. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Of course, F-Type efficiency takes a back seat when moving up through the aforementioned trims, but the more potent V6 is still pretty reasonable at 11.9 L/100km city, 8.5 highway and 10.4 combined, at least when it’s mated to the automatic. This engine allows for a six-speed manual too, which isn’t quite as praiseworthy at 14.9, 9.8 and 12.6 respectively. 

Enough silliness, because we all know buyers in this class don’t care one iota about fuel economy despite all the effort that Jaguar puts into such regulatory concerns. The F-Type is really about titillating the five senses via near overwhelming visual stimulation when parked and endorphin releasing on-road acrobatics when active. Of course, 296 horsepower can’t excite to the same levels as 550 or 575, but this F-Type P300 is the perfect way to make each day more enjoyable without breaking the bank. It’s an affordable exotic that’s as worthy of the “Growler” emblem on its grille and wheel caps as the “Leaper” atop its rear deck lid. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press 

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press 

Copyright: Canadian Auto Press Inc.

CarCostCanada

New entry-level Porsche 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T revealed

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T
These new just above base 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T models prove that less can be more when less weight and money buys more performance. (Photo: Porsche)

Up to this point Porsche has offered its 718 Cayman coupe and 718 Boxster roadster in base, S and GTS trims, but soon its most affordable line of sports cars will arrive with a new “T” designation, which promises performance purists less of what they don’t want and more of what they do. 

Specifically, 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T buyers will get more performance features in a car that costs and weighs less. Starting with the base model’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder boxer engine, good for 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque, T models add a short-throw shifter, a mechanically locking differential and Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) in base six-speed manual guise, or the Sport Chrono Package as standard equipment for seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK cars, the latter resulting in 0.2 seconds of extra jump off the line from a car that’s already 0.2 seconds quicker than the manual. 

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
Performance promises to be the special 718 T models’ strong suit. (Photo: Porsche)

Also notable, the Sport Chrono Package includes Launch Control and a “push-to-pass” style Sport Response button in the centre of the steering wheel-mounted driving mode switch, making it the transmission of choice when ultimate performance is paramount. 

To clarify more fully, straight-line performance with the manual remains the same as the regular 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman at 5.1 seconds from standstill, while PDK-enhanced cars increase their zero to 100km/h sprint times from 4.9 to 4.7 seconds, identical to the base 718 models. Likewise, both base cars’ top speeds continue into T trim unchanged at 275 km/h. 

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
Euro models get a big gaping hole where the PCM touchscreen normally goes. (Photo: Porsche)

Additional standard go-fast goodies in T trim include Porsche Active Drivetrain Mounts (PADM) that incorporate dynamic hard and soft gearbox mounts for reducing vibration and even improving performance, claims Porsche, plus a sport exhaust system, unique high-gloss titanium grey-painted 20-inch five-spoke alloy wheels, and a first for the base turbo-four, the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damping system that, depending on the Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual driving mode selected, instantly adjusts for road surface conditions and driving style changes, all riding on a 20-millimetre lower ride height. 

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
Door handles? Who needs them when you’ve got mesh fabric door pulls? (Photo: Porsche)

Making a visual statement is a grey side striping package featuring scripted “718 Cayman T” or “718 Boxster T” nomenclatures, and Agate grey mirror caps to match the aforementioned wheels, plus black chrome tailpipes. 

Inside, the 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T are upgraded with a GT sport steering wheel, scripted “Cayman T” or “Boxster T” logos highlighting the black instrument dials, gloss black instrument panel inlays and centre console trim, special red paint for the gear shift pattern atop the shift knob, two-way powered seats, seat upholstery featuring black Sport-Tex centre sections, embroidered “718” logos on the headrests, plus the most identifiable addition of all, black mesh fabric door pulls in place of the usual door handles, which can be changed for optional coloured pulls as seen in associated photos. 

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
Nice interior details include a red-painted shift pattern atop the shift knob. (Photo: Porsche)

When checking the gallery you may also notice something missing from both cars’ instrument panels, their Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreens that have been removed to reduce weight, and replaced by a big, gaping hole Porsche calls a “large storage compartment.” We won’t see this omission in Canada due to a new regulation that made backup cameras mandatory as of May 2018. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T
The 718 T models should handle brilliantly. (Photo: Porsche)

For this reason we shouldn’t hold out any hope for Canadian-spec 718 T models to be offered at five- to 10-percent discounts when compared to the current base Cayman and Boxster when outfitted with identical features, as promised in European markets, but we should get to choose from the same standard and optional colour palette that will include black, Indian Red, Racing Yellow, and white at no extra charge, plus optional Carrara White, Deep Black and GT Silver metallic hues, as well as somewhat pricier Lava Orange and Miami Blue special colours. 

If you like what you see, make sure to contact your local Porsche dealer to reserve your very own 718 Cayman T or 718 Boxster T, because special models like these are in the habit of selling out quickly.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press 

Photo credits: Porsche 

Copyright: Canadian Auto Press Inc.