2019 Kia Forte EX Limited Road Test Review

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Kia knows a thing or two about style, this made very apparent with the new Forte. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I must admit to really liking the new 2019 Forte sedan’s styling, as its lines are clean and modern instead of abstract like the more visually complicated Honda Civic or new 2020 Toyota Corolla. It’s not that I don’t like the latter two cars, but generally find the Forte easier on the eyes, and believe if placed in a row next to the two other cars with badges were removed, would be chosen more often than not. 

Of course, the Civic and Corolla were highly successful long before their current designs were known, because they’ve always been very good cars, while their current shapes are obviously acceptable enough to the Canadian masses or they wouldn’t sit one and two in popularity, both selling within Canada’s top-ten, including trucks, crossover SUVs and vans. I just happen to like the Forte’s visual design more than these two segment leaders. 

The Forte’s styling strengths include a longer looking, leaner, lower, more sweptback profile, which doesn’t require as much plastic body cladding to make more appealing. It does get a number of stylistic enhancements from front to rear, but I found the sporty bits on my top-tier Forte EX Limited improved its overall look instead of detracting from it. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Clean, attractive lines come standard, although the Forte is shown here in EX Limited trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It starts off with Kia’s chrome-edged, glossed-black notched oval grille at centre, which hovers above more glossy black-detailed air induction venting within the lower front fascia, which gets highlighted by nicely angled corner vents housing rectangular LED fog lights. A truly interesting set of “X” accented LED headlights are positioned above, offsetting conventionally shaped taillights at the other end, these infused with interestingly patterned LEDs. There’s a thin strip of reflective material spanning the two rear lamps, while just above on the rear deck lid is an integrated spoiler that no doubt aids aerodynamics. The rear bumper is formed into a diffuser-like shape, but I can pretty well guarantee it does nothing to improve airflow, although its inky black paint looks sporty enough, and matches the gloss-black triangular bezels at each corner, housing rear fog and backup lights. Lastly, my Forte tester rolled on sweet looking 17-inch double-five-spoke machined alloy wheels with black pockets. 

The new Forte is even more impressive inside, besting the outgoing model as well as a number of compact rivals. Like its exterior design, its cabin comes across more tastefully conservative than some in this class that offer up less serious, funkier atmospheres. It’s also quite refined, with much of the upper dash and instrument panel finished in premium-like soft-touch composites. This pliable application covers the front door uppers, door inserts and armrests too, the latter items also transferring to the rear passenger compartment. It’s a really upscale environment, but I won’t go so far as to say the Forte is nicer than its competitors with respect to materials quality, fit and finish, etcetera, but they were one of the first brands to include such premium-like niceties to the compact segment. As it is, most of the Forte’s challengers’ interiors are now up to snuff. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Kia does details very well, not overwhelming the design, but instead enhancing it. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Adding to my EX Limited model’s refinement quotient are perforated leatherette seats that feel a lot more like genuine hides than most rivals pull off, the aeration, incidentally, necessary for my tester’s three-way ventilation up front. This top-line trim also includes rear outboard seat heating, while three-temperature front seat heating is standard across the line, as is a leather-wrapped heatable steering wheel rim. 

Yes, that wasn’t a typo. The Forte comes standard with a leather-clad, heated steering wheel. I want you to consider for a moment, that Toyota’s much pricier Camry doesn’t even offer Canadians such a highfalutin option, even when fully loaded. Optioning out a Camry would add almost $24k to the Forte’s $17,195 base MT MSRP, or alternatively $13k to this $28,065 Forte EX Limited, yet no heated steering wheel, plus it would also not provide cooled front seats or heated rear seats (be sure to learn about all 2019 Kia Forte pricing, including trim levels, packages and options, right here at CarCostCanada, plus don’t forget that you can save a lot by finding out about available rebates and dealer invoice pricing, also available right here at CarCostCanada). 

After the last few Canadian winters, I would certainly rather live with a heated steering wheel than a cold leather rim first thing in the morning (if only they could find a way to heat the shifter knob too), and it would be nicer for my rear passengers to warm their behinds, just like my front passenger and I were able to. I enjoy cooling my butt mid-summer too, so if you’re like me, consider a Forte for such comforting features (and also take note that the 2020 Corolla sedan provides a heated steering wheel as part of an upgrade package, but then again no cooled front seats or heatable rear cushions). 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
The graphic work on the LED taillights is very nice. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Back to the 2019 Forte’s upgrades, Kia improved its automatic shifter with a great looking leather-wrapped and satin-silver knob design, while a stitched-leatherette skirt tapers outward as it meets up against yet more satin-silver surfacing. My Forte used this stylish silver treatment for its steering wheel spokes as well, plus some decorative trim across the instrument panel and the corner vent bezels, not to mention the inside door handles and power window/side mirror switchgear decoration, and lastly the thumb release button on the manual handbrake. 

Say what? Agreed, a complete ground-up redesign that doesn’t come standard with an electric parking brake seems a tad old school this day and age, but truthfully it didn’t bother me one iota during my extended two-week test. Actually, I only noticed it on my last day when taking notes. Kia left this technological anachronism in the new design because of the car’s standard six-speed manual transmission, a gearbox that I only wished was available in my top-line trim, or at least in a dedicated sport model like Kia’s sister company Hyundai offers with its 200-horsepower Elantra Sport, a serious Civic Si rival that also improves its suspension and styling. 

News flash (well, not exactly news as it was introduced last November): Kia will introduce a new Forte GT for the 2020 model year that’s pretty well an Elantra Sport in black-oval drag, and it looks fabulous with its 18-inch rims and even sportier design details, while it should drive brilliantly if it’s anything like the Elantra Sport, that I raved about in my road test review last year. Along with the 201-hp 1.6-litre turbo-four and short-throw six-speed manual gearbox (or optional paddle shift-actuated seven-speed dual-clutch automatic), it’ll get a sport-tuned fully independent suspension with a multi-link setup in the rear. Soon Kia will have the same kind of Civic Si Sedan fighter it’s always needed, along with a new five-door Forte5 GT. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Kia delivers a high-quality Forte interior that’s packed full of standard and optional features. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As it is, this 2019 Forte only comes with one engine, a 2.0-litre four-cylinder making 147 horsepower and 132 lb-ft of torque. It’s a fairly competitive mill in this category, but other manufacturers provide a lot more variety and (until the 2020 model debuts) will therefore attract a greater number of performance, and/or green buyers. Toyota, for instance, offers up the choice of three engines in its latest 2020 Corolla sedan, including a hybrid, while Honda’s Civic Sedan offers three powerplants as well, the aforementioned Si boasting 205 horsepower, while the Insight, which is a Civic Hybrid other than mild styling revisions and a new name, features gasoline-electric hybridization as well. 

Interestingly, the outgoing second-gen Forte four-door provided Canadians with two engines, the more advanced direct-injected version of the current model’s 2.0-litre four-cylinder, previously named “2.0 GDI”, no longer available despite its more engaging 164 horsepower and 151 lb-ft of torque. I initially thought we’d see this more formidable engine as a late arrival, possibly when the redesigned Forte5 showed up, but a quick visit to the “Upcoming Vehicles” section of the automaker’s Canadian retail site makes evident this all-new five-door hatch will go on sale this fall as a 2020 model, and shows no sign of the sportier GDI engine. Instead it will get the sedan’s “2.0L MPI” engine in base trim and the same optional 1.6-litre turbo-four used in the gen-two 2018 model (which is still available, by the way), good for 201 horsepower, 195 lb-ft of torque, and mated to the same paddle-shifted seven-speed twin-clutch automatic as noted above. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
This supervision LCD/TFT primary instrument cluster comes standard with second-rung EX trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All this said, Kia’s reasoning behind simplifying the Forte’s engine lineup has to come down to 2018 calendar year sales that only reached 14,399 units (including the Forte5), this dropping some 12.1 percent from the previous year. If it pulled in more buyers, like the Corolla’s 48,796 customers throughout 2018, and the 69,005 Canadians who opted for the Civic over the same 12 months, Kia might even go back to offering a two-door sports coupe like they used to. 

Right about now I should make note of Hyundai Elantra sales as well (which will soon be all-new for 2020), as it far outpaces the Forte’s numbers at 41,784 through 2018, and that was a 9.4-percent decline from 2017. 

I expect another reason Kia chose its solo engine for 2019 is price related, both at the onset of the initial sale and afterwards at the pump. Canadians are ultra price-sensitive in this small car category, which would negatively impact sales if the more powerful engine caused the Forte’s price range to jump higher. What’s more, if the 2.0 GDI was the car’s sole offering its fuel economy wouldn’t measure up to the best in this class, and therefore would hamper acceptance of the entire Forte line. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
The new eight-inch infotainment touchscreen is excellent. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Instead, the 2.0 MPI engine being used is considerably more efficient, with a glance back at 2018 Transport Canada fuel economy numbers showing a rating of 8.0 L/100km city, 6.1 highway and 7.1 combined, alongside the more potent GDI’s respective rating of 9.4, 6.8 and 8.3. That would’ve been a big gap to overcome. 

Also notable, Kia’s made a lot of headway with the 2.0 MPI engine’s fuel economy in the new 2019 model too, with a new Transport Canada rating of 8.6 L/100km in the city, 6.4 on the highway and 7.6 combined when suited up in six-speed manual base trim, compared to 9.4, 6.8 and 8.3 respectively in the previous year. Additionally, the Forte’s completely new Hyundai/Kia-designed continuously variable transmission (CVT) is easier on fuel when put up against last year’s six-speed automatic, with the new model getting a 7.7 L/100km city, 5.9 highway and 6.9 combined rating, and the outgoing car only good for 8.0 in the city, 6.1 on the highway and 7.1 combined. 

This CVT, dubbed Intelligent Variable Transmission (IVT), adds $2,500 to the Forte’s base LX trim and comes standard with all other models. It does a pretty good a job of putting power down to the front wheels, which is high praise for any CVT incidentally, this one of the best of its kind in my opinion, and easily good enough for a compact car that makes comfort its first priority. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Two-zone auto HVAC is standard on EX Premium trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Forte is quick enough off the line and plenty smooth as well, its engine and transmission offering up nice linear performance, with untoward noise, vibration and harshness kept to a minimum. Kia includes a slew of Drive Mode Select settings including Normal, Eco, Sport and Smart, the latter being where I left it most of the time thanks to its ability to automatically adjust between each mode in order to optimize fuel economy and performance. 

Along with the Forte’s smooth powertrain is a comfortable ride, while its cornering prowess is quite responsive considering its rather low-rent torsion beam rear suspension setup. By comparison the Civic and new 2020 Corolla incorporate independent multi-link rear suspension systems, which give them an edge when pushed even harder over broken pavement, especially mid-turn, but just the same I found the Forte nimble enough for most high-speed handling situations, while its undercarriage was wonderfully compliant over rougher pavement in a straight line. The upcoming GT should be even better. 

Maintaining control in all weather conditions is this segment’s usual assortment of active safety equipment, including electronic stability and traction control, while some other near-standard features (when upgrading to the CVT) include Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA), Lane Keeping Assist (LKA), and Driver Attention Alert (DAA). 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Cooled seats? Yah baby, you can’t get that on a Corolla. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Both manual and CVT endowed LX models also get auto on/off projector headlights, splash guards, body-colour mirror housings and door handles, heated outside mirrors, the heated leather-clad steering wheel rim noted earlier, heatable front seats, air conditioning, a truly impressive new tablet-style 8.0-inch touchscreen display with tap, pinch, and swipe gesture controls (plus really quick response to inputs), Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone connectivity, a backup camera with helpful active guidelines, an AM/FM/MP3 radio, Bluetooth hands-free with steaming audio, USB inputs, cruise control, Hill-Assist Control (HAC), 60/40-split rear seatbacks that fold down to make the 434-litre (15.3 cu-ft) trunk more accepting of longer cargo like skis, plus more. 

Those who want alloy wheels can upgrade to $20,995 EX trim, which replace the base model’s 15-inch steel wheels and covers with sharp looking 16-inch machine-finished rims, while this trim grade also receives LED headlights, LED DRLs, LED positioning lamps, side mirror turn signals, a glossy black grille treatment with chromed accents, chromed window surrounds, aeroblade windshield wipers, a chromed exhaust finisher, the satin-chrome interior door handles noted earlier, a supervision LCD/TFT primary gauge cluster, a wireless smartphone charger, rear climate vents, a folding rear centre armrest, tire pressure monitoring, Blind Spot Detection (BSD) with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), etcetera. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
Kia’s “SOFINO” leatherette upholstery feels real, and the seats are comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Moving up to $22,495 EX+ trim adds everything above plus 17-inch machined alloys, LED tail lamps, LED interior lights, plus a powered glass sunroof, while $25,065 EX Premium trim further adds High Beam Assist (HBA) to the previously mentioned LED headlamps, as well as proximity-sensing keyless entry, pushbutton start/stop, dynamic cruise control, an eight-way powered driver’s seat, “SOFINO” leatherette upholstery, two-zone auto HVAC, XM/SIRIUS satellite radio, UVO Intelligence connected car services, Advanced Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA), a proximity-sensing trunk lid that automatically opens when someone with a key fob stands behind the car for three seconds, plus more. 

Finally, my $28,065 EX Limited test model came standard with all of the above plus those ventilated front and heated rear seats noted before, as well as an enhanced multimedia infotainment interface with very accurate and user-friendly navigation, and lastly an impressive Harman/Kardon premium audio upgrade. 

The driver’s seat was very comfortable for this class, while its two-way powered lumbar support thankfully fit the small of my back perfectly. Even better, when I adjusted the Forte’s standard tilt and telescoping steering column to fit my long-legged five-foot-eight frame, I was left comfortably in control. This isn’t always the case no matter the class of car, particularly with Toyota models, including the now outgoing 2019 Corolla. That car didn’t allow for enough telescopic steering column reach, either leaving the pedals too close or steering wheel uncomfortably far away, but fortunately I had no such issues with this Forte sedan. 

2019 Kia Forte EX LimitedAfter setting up the driver’s seat for my body type, I sat directly behind in order to test rear seat roominess. The result was loads of space for my feet, plus about five inches in front of my knees, another three and a half or so over my head, about five beside my outer shoulder, and four next to my hip. In other words, the Forte provides a lot of room for rear passengers, and plenty of comfort too. 

The rear centre armrest was nicely positioned for my arm and included the usual dual cupholders, while a webbed magazine pocket behind the front passenger seat looked nicer than the bare seatback ahead of my legs. Still, I could hardly complain about not having a webbed magazine pocket behind the driver’s seat thanks to my butt and backside being warm and comfortable from those seat warmers noted earlier, plus I also appreciated the small rear quarter windows that allowed for a bit more light and outward visibility than some cars in this class provide. 

2019 Kia Forte EX Limited
The Forte provides plenty of trunk space, plus the ability to extend it via 60/40-split rear seatbacks. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

That’s a nice positive thought to leave the 2019 Kia Forte review on, isn’t it? While not best in class due to a lack of optional power and less capable rear suspension, it’s easily the best Forte four-door ever created. These shortcomings help keep pricing nice and low, however, plus allow Kia to offer plenty of comfort-oriented features that I’d rather have in a city car anyway. The Forte also doesn’t come up short on styling, space, comfort or safety, and let’s remember that Forte buyers who want stronger performance can choose the old Forte5 and soon will have the GT and redesigned 5 for options. 

Kia will soon have its bases covered two renewed body styles and truly sporty variants of both, while today’s 2019 Forte sedan makes an excellent case for affordable commuting comfort. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

Gorgeous 2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato debuts online

2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato
The beautiful new DBS GT Zagato promises brilliant performance and a level of exclusivity few Canadians can enjoy. (Photo: Aston Martin)

If you’re hoping to take delivery of a new 2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato, you’ve already made your deposit and accepted that you won’t just be purchasing one car, but actually buying two. 

The new model made its online debut this week, sporting three stunning vantage points thanks to a very talented artist, and despite only seeing graphic renderings with no physical preproduction example available, 19 well-to-do investors anted up sizeable deposits for a set of cars that will set them back a total of $9.8 million CAD (£6 million GBP). 

To clarify, the breathtakingly beautiful 1960s-style DB4 GT Zagato drawn into the background of each photo comes as part of the near $10 million package, the two cars making up Aston Martin’s “DBZ Centenary Collection.” The more contemporary model is actually based on the already impressive DBS Superleggera, a car that shoehorns a big twin-turbo 5.2-litre V12 engine under its long, elegant, shapely hood, this motor good for a supercar-like 715 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque. 

So far we haven’t been told anything about engine specifications regarding the new DBS GT Zagato, but we should expect at least as much performance as offered in the DBS Superleggera, and also consider that more might be coming thanks to the original ‘60s-era DB4 GT Zagato providing a great deal more at the rear wheels than the standard DB4. Still, no matter the powertrain behind the upcoming Aston’s massive new grille, all of its additional attributes are worthy of your attention. 

2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato
The car you can barely see in the background comes as part of the package for just under $10 million CAD. (Photo: Aston Martin)

For starters, it’s clear Aston wanted the new DBS GT Zagato to show a direct lineage to the outgoing Vanquish Zagato that arrived four years ago. They even painting both launch models in the same eye-arresting metallic red, while adorning key exterior accents in metallic gold, even painting the 20-inch twin-five-spoke alloy rims in the same rich hue. 

Additional styling elements adopted from old to new include the big front grille noted a moment ago, plus the double-bump floating-type black roof, a bulging set of rear fenders, and “rocket booster” style tail lamps, yet while the DBS GT Zagato nods to its predecessor with respect, there’s no denying it’s an entirely new model that shares little with the past. Specifically, the DBS Superleggera that underpins the new car has hard points that can’t be unseen, particularly its longer and lower shape that wows with plenty more folds and creases than the car from four years ago. 

Also interesting from a design and functional perspective, is the gold-painted active front grille that incorporates an insert comprised of 108 separate carbon fibre components. When turned off the DBS GT Zagato looks as if its grille is little more than a patterned panel without an opening, but then when the engine is fired up the many tiny segments open up for engine ventilation, this process making the grille appear as if it “flutters” in the wind, said Aston. 

2020 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato
This DB4 GT Zagato comes as part of the two-car package. (Photo: Aston Martin)

Yet more interesting details include angularly sculpted side vents highlighted with more gold trim, while the rocker panels just below don’t extend outward with Aston’s usual carbon fibre side sills, but instead get neatly rolled under the car like classic models did half a century ago. 

Unlike the ovoid headlamps found on the Vanquish Zagato, the new clusters are more in line with today’s Aston Martin design language, while the artfully constructed taillights sit on the outer edges of a large horizontal carbon fibre panel at back, which visually hovers over an even bigger working carbon fibre diffuser under the rear bumper. 

Carbon fibre gets used for the roof panel too, but the DBS GT Zagato doesn’t merely top itself off with any old hardtop. It gets a single section of CFRP that stretches from the top of the windshield to the forward edge of the rear deck lid, while the roof’s aforementioned twin-bubble design made even more unorthodox by not including a rear window or even a set of louvres for rearward visibility. Instead, Aston added a backup camera within a digital rearview mirror, which potentially has the ability to cover much more area than a conventional mirror would allow for. 

2020 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato
This two-car approach is strictly designed for collectors. (Photo: Aston Martin)

When your new DBS GT Zagato arrives at your local Aston Martin dealership next year, either bring along a friend or hire a flatbed driver to pick up your DB4 GT Zagato as well. This gorgeous classic was first shown in France at the 24 Hours of Le Mans last month, and is the newest in a growing line of continuation cars that was initiated with 25 examples of the DB4 GT Continuation in 2017, which retailed for $2.4 million CAD (£1.5 million), followed by another 25 Goldfinger DB5 Continuation models, which, as you may have just guessed, are exact replicas of the star-car that instantly became famous in the 1964 007 classic Goldfinger. It features all the innovative weapons and active armour the original offered James Bond (less any explosive charges or an actual ejecting passenger seat), so its no wonder this model sold out quickly.  

The Goldfinger DB5 Continuation will be delivered in 2020, by the way, just like the two new DBS GT Zagato and DB4 GT Zagato models described in this news story, but for only $4.5 million CAD (£2.75 million) each. 

While all of these prices are without doubt unreachable for the majority of Canadians, those who can afford this lofty point of entry aren’t merely throwing their money away. In fact, some might even see these cars as investments, especially when considering prices paid for earlier examples. For instance, a 1962 DB4 GT Zagato was purchased for $15.4 million CAD (£9.45 million) a few years ago, and that wasn’t even the highest price paid. 

2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato
How would you like to have these two Aston Martin Zagatos in your garage? (Photo: Aston Martin)

Thanks to some unused chassis allocation numbers, Aston Martin produced four more DB4 GT Zagatos in 1988, these given “Sanction II” designations, and then a dozen years later in 2000 the British carmaker built an additional pair of these “Sanction II” specified cars with a unique “Sanction III” designation, and these two models fetched $18.6 million CAD ($14,300,000 USD) in 2015 and $16.5 million CAD (£10,081,500) in 2018 apiece, which made them two of the highest priced cars to ever roll across an auction block. 

It would be irresponsible for any of the 19 new DB4 GT Zagato owners to speculate on the future value of their cars, of course, yet the just noted past success of these highly sought after classics might make them better bets than many other rolling collectibles, and who knows? If one day they can sell their DB4 GT Zagatos for $10 million or more, they may end up paying nothing at all for the fabulous new 2020 DBS GT Zagato. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Aston Martin

Want To Get Out Of Your Lease Early? Here’s How!

When it comes to getting behind the wheel of a new ride, many opting for leasing. Despite the fact that you don’t own the vehicle, you have a lot of flexibility when it comes to upgrading. In fact, a majority of people choose to lease simply because they want to have the latest car at all times. Leases also tend to cost less (depending on the term and type of car) – another reason many opt for them.

While leasing a vehicle does provide great benefits and is a viable option for those who don’t want to fully commit to a vehicle, there may come a time where you want to get out of your lease. This could be because you want to purchase and own a vehicle, you are not satisfied with the make and/or model, or you are unable to make payments. Terminating a lease early can be a costly action, so much so, that keeping your lease until it is up may be the best option. With that being said, if you are looking to terminate your lease without paying an arm and a leg, there are options available.

Here’s how to get out of a car lease early in Canada without spending a fortune:

 

Transfer your lease to someone else

With all the e-commerce sites out there, selling products has never been easier. Vehicles are always in high demand and many turn to online sites to browse potential options. If you want out of your lease early, transferring your lease is the most cost-efficient option available. How does this work? Talk to your dealer and request a transfer of the lease. The person you are transferring too will officially take over any payments for the remaining term of the vehicle. 

It is important to note that in some instances, your name may still be on the contract, ergo, should the person of transfer miss payments, you could be held accountable. It’s important to ensure the person taking over the lease is committed to paying in a timely manner. There is also a transfer fee associated with this process, typically ranging between $50-$500, albeit, still cheaper than terminating your lease without transferring it.

 

Buy out the vehicle

When it comes to a lease, there are quite a few restrictions. Typically, leased vehicles cap at 20,000-24,000km a year with hefty costs added for additional kilometres. Because the vehicle isn’t yours and you eventually have to return it, you may find yourself feeling uncomfortable or unable to fully appreciate the vehicle. If you are looking to break free of any restrictions, own the vehicle, and finances aren’t an issue, buying the car out may be your best bet. 

If you want to break out of your lease, the dealership may offer you incentives when it comes to buying out the vehicle (after all, they are making a sale). Unlike a lease, you aren’t paying for the depreciation value, but rather, the full value of the vehicle. For example, if a vehicle is $20,000, your total lease term will not equal that amount – only the amount that particular vehicle depreciates over your term. When you finance, however, you are paying the total cost of the vehicle, in this case, $20,000, over the span of your term. It’s important to discuss this option with your dealer and see what offers and incentives are available to you should you make the switch. 

 

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

Sometimes, we are put in situations that are less than ideal. Some situations can impact our financial state and vastly affect our ability to make payments on time. When this occurs, many jump to terminating as many monthly payments as possible, including a vehicle lease. Prior to completing a costly termination, talk to your leasing company and explain your situation. They may be able to lower your monthly payment or even suspend it for a period of time. 

Your leasing company may opt to lower your monthly payment if your payments have been in good standing prior to. If you have been up to date with payments and proven that you were able to financially afford your lease, your chances of them lower your monthly payments increase.

When it comes to the temporary suspension of payments, it’s important to know that this isn’t a free pass for that period. The total amount of payments incurred within the suspension period will be added back onto your lease when the period is over. You will have to make up for these payments, typically monthly. This means your monthly payments thereafter may go up, however, it’s a viable option if you feel your financial state will only be negatively impacted for a short period of time. 

 

What NOT to do when terminating a lease early

With every good option, comes a bad one. Despite the fact that there are plenty of available options to safely terminate a lease, there are some that could cost you a significant amount of money or land you in some hot water.

Returning the vehicle

While this isn’t a particularly bad option, it is costly. Opting to return the vehicle before your lease term is up comes with some hefty payments including a termination fee and the remaining depreciation value. This amount typically resides in the thousands. While it will rid you of the contract, you will still be stuck with a large bill at the end. 

Avoiding future payments

This is the cream of the crop when it comes to bad options and should be avoided at all costs. Ceasing payments can have a detrimental impact on your credit and overall financial state. This is typically referred to as defaulting on the payments. This can be done by cancelling the card utilized to pay the lease or not having sufficient funds to pay on a consistent basis. Not only can this option put a huge toll on your credit and financial state, but it can also be grounds for legal action. Leasing companies have the option to sue should you be in arrears with payments. It’s best to avoid this at all costs and opt for an option that won’t put you in a sticky situation down the road. 

 

Terminating a lease early may be done for a variety of reasons, but before you go through the expensive process of doing so, make sure you weigh out your options. Doing so can help you avoid hefty fines and lump-sum payments.

Looking to make the switch from leasing to owning? Our Dealer Invoice Report can save you some serious money on your next purchase – no hefty fees here!

New Porsche Taycan EV on three-continent Shanghai, Goodwood and NYC tour

2020 Porsche Taycan
Porsche has taken its new Taycan EV on a three-continent tour, starting at its Experience Centre in Shanghai. (Photo: Porsche)

Fans of electric vehicles have been over the moon about the soon to arrive 2020 Taycan, and now that Porsche has a pre-production model strutting its stuff on a global tour, we’re all getting a taste of what’s to come. 

The sleek four-door coupe-style Taycan is currently on a “Triple Demo Run” that started off on the first week of July on the Porsche Experience Centre (PEC) handling track in Shanghai, China, where Porsche Carrera Cup Asia driver Li Chao coaxed it around 1.4 kilometres of high-speed curves. This particular Taycan was closest to a street-ready production model anyone outside of Porsche’s inner circle has seen yet, the black-painted model adorned with a stunning red dragon graphic upon its roof. 

“The exceptional performance typical for Porsche was a clear development objective for the Taycan. You can sense that right from the start,” an enthusiastic Chao, who was especially impressed by the Taycan’s handling, stated after his initial run. “From uncompromisingly sporty to surprisingly comfortable, the chassis of the new Taycan covers a wide range and successfully combines the precise handling of a sports car and the long-distance comfort of a saloon. In addition to its low centre of gravity, the rear-axle steering also plays a crucial role. The Taycan steers into corners very directly and has plenty of grip.” 

2020 Porsche Taycan
Porsche Carrera Cup Asia driver Li Chao was at the Taycan’s wheel for the event in China. (Photo: Porsche)

The new Taycan houses a quick-charging 800-volt architecture plus a 90-kWh lithium-ion battery, resulting in 592 horsepower (600 PS). The new Porsche catapults from 0 to 100km/h in less than 3.5 seconds, continues on to 200 km/h in under 12 seconds, and tops out above 250 km/h, making it one of the fastest four-door production sedans ever made. 

Continuing on its worldwide journey, the new Taycan silently sped up the popular “Hill Run” at the famed West Sussex, England-based Goodwood Estate that hosts the Goodwood Festival of Speed each year. Tasked with driving duties, multiple racing-winning Formula 1 veteran and LMP1/Porsche 919 Hybrid World Endurance Championship (WEC) contender Mark Webber, showed just how awesomely quick the new Porsche can be (make sure to watch the videos below for more).  

“The Taycan’s power delivery is awesome,” said Webber. “I took part in this event in a Porsche 911 GT2 RS two years ago, so I already knew that it all comes down to power and traction. But, even for a thoroughbred racing driver like me, it is amazing how the Taycan – even though it’s still a prototype – accelerates off the start and out of the corners.” 

2020 Porsche Taycan
The start of the Goodwood Festival of Speed “Hill Run” with F1 race-winning driver Mark Webber at the wheel. (Photo: Porsche)

Next on the agenda is a New York City stint as part of the ABB FIA Formula E Championship season finale, a fitting event for an electric super sedan. This final demo run will see Formula E driver and 2016 24 Hours of Le Mans winner (while driving a WEC Porsche LMP1 car no less) Neel Jani at the wheel, so be sure to watch all the action on your favourite video streaming site. 

While all this ultra-fast electrification is fun for auto enthusiasts everywhere, and mostly seen as a positive for the green movement, no one can say for sure how the Taycan will measure up to its most obvious EV rival when it comes to sales success. The now somewhat long-in-tooth Tesla Model S had led all battery-powered competitors on the sales charts up to the point its own Tesla Model 3 sibling arrived on the scene, so the question now remains whether the Taycan can truly pose a threat to the Model S, or will remain as a niche player like all non-Tesla EV entries so far. 

Let’s face it. Tesla virtually owns the electrified sport-luxury market. The Model S, which arrived in 2012, not only outsells all other electric competitors in its mid-size E-segment, but actually outperforms every conventionally powered mid-size luxury model other than the BMW 5 Series and top-selling Mercedes-Benz E-Class. This said, Model S deliveries fell 6.3 percent in 2018, and a much more sizeable 56 percent during the first three months of this year, but this may have more to do with its four-door sedan body style than any lack of interest in the Tesla brand, because both the E-Class and 5 Series found themselves in the same downward spiral, with Audi’s recently redesigned A6 and A7, plus Porsche’s Panamera bucking the trend. Still, despite its downturn, the Model S managed to hang onto third place in the mid-size E-segment. 

2020 Porsche Taycan
At less than 3.5 seconds from standstill to 100km/h, the Taycan is blisteringly quick. (Photo: Porsche)

The Panamera grew by 40.1 percent in calendar year 2018, and didn’t lose much of that market share during Q1 of 2019 either after experiencing a small loss of 0.8 percent. Tesla’s Model S, however, outpaced the Panamera by a near three-to-one ratio last year, and 2.5-to-one over the initial three months of 2019, but it’s nevertheless safe say the recent sales strength of both premium cars is a good sign for potential future success of the new Taycan. 

The Panamera, which available with various conventional engines plus two electrified hybrid powertrains, is very close in size to the Model S, at least before taking overall length into account. So far Porsche hasn’t released official Taycan dimensions, but if the production model ends up being close to in size to the Mission E concept it will be slightly shorter, albeit quite a bit wider and significantly lower than either the Panamera or Model S, but it will still fit ideally within the mid-size E-segment. 

This brings us to a question: As impressive as the new Taycan appears to be, can the upstart Porsche EV punt the longstanding Tesla titleholder off the top sales-leadership podium? That Jaguar has had difficulty attracting EV customers to its new I-Pace, despite that model being a crossover utility and therefore more in line with current automotive trends, actually makes sense because the British luxury brand already has major problems finding buyers for its conventionally powered models, but Audi, amongst the auto industry’s hotter luxury brands, recently introduced the all-electric E-Tron, a crossover that’s even more traditionally SUV-like, and it hasn’t made much of a dent into Tesla Model X territory either. 

2020 Porsche Taycan
“It is amazing how the Taycan – even though it’s still a prototype – accelerates off the start and out of the corners,” said ex-F1 star Mark Webber. (Photo: Porsche)

To bring you up to date on U.S. EV market growth, June saw increased sector sales of 120 percent, but take note that most of the 29,632 deliveries were attributed to Tesla, its 23,914-unit total accounting for 83 percent of market share growth due to 20,550 Model 3 (a compact luxury D-segment four-door sedan) buyers, 2,725 Model X (a mid-size luxury crossover SUV) customers, and new 1,750 Model S owners. Tesla aside, EV sales from other brands increased by 30 percent in June, which is excellent, but of course this number was comparatively small at 4,718 units total. 

As anyone can surmise, earning a profit while selling in small numbers is not going to happen, with the next best-selling Nissan Leaf only able to deliver 1,156 units, Chevy’ impressive Bolt only finding 1,190 buyers (its worst YTD result), Honda positively surprising all with 1,092 Clarity FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle) deliveries, Audi’s aforementioned E-Tron sales actually dropping from 856 units in May to 726 (after 253 down the road during its first month of April), BMW’s i3 having its best month so far this year with 473 sales, Jaguar’s new I-Pace managing its second-best month with 236 deliveries, Toyota pushing 166 Mirai FCVs out the door, Hyundai’s Kona EV finding 127 new owners, and other EV models like Kia’s Soul EV, Volkswagen’s E-Golf, etcetera not being accounted for due to having their sales numbers combined with conventionally models bearing the same nameplate. 

Just which list the new Porsche Taycan gets added to, either alongside Tesla’s strong sales or somewhere mixed in with all other EV makers, is unknown for now, but we only have to wait until later this year to find out. Until the new production Taycan gets officially revealed in September and then arrives in Porsche dealerships later this year, makes sure to enjoy our photo gallery above and collection of videos below. 

 

Kicking off in China: the Porsche Taycan prototype visits Shanghai (1:00):

Porsche Taycan prototype visits Goodwood Festival of Speed 2019 (1:41):

Hey Porsche, watch this video. Love, Electricity (1:03):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4×4 Road Test

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
Ford redesigned the Expedition for 2018, making this 2019 model carryover, but it still looks mighty fine. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Ford’s latest Expedition is one great looking full-size SUV, but I’m certain that once you’ve fully read my comprehensive review you’ll be a lot more impressed at what lies beneath its handsome new face and boldly shaped body lines. 

Just like generations past, this new fourth-generation Expedition rides on the same body-on-frame platform as the F-Series pickup truck, albeit this time around it’s based on the new T-Platform that underpins the highly advanced, lightweight aluminum-bodied blue-oval workhorse you’ve heard so much about for the last few years. 

This full-size Ford SUV received a ground-up redesign for model year 2018, and like the just-noted F-Series it now benefits from its own mostly aluminum skin. The stylish design sits atop a high-strength lightweight boron steel and aluminium frame that further reduces its curb weight by 44 kilograms to 90 kg (depending on trim) when compared its predecessor, or 135 kg when stretched to long-wheelbase Expedition Max lengths, but despite its considerable weight loss the redesigned SUV is more than 100 mm longer than the outgoing version in regular wheelbase form, and 28 mm lengthier in its larger Max body style, while its wheelbase is stretched by almost 90 mm for the regular-length model and 15 mm with the Max, plus it gains more than 25 mm from side to side. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
The Expedition has length on its side, making it the most accommodating SUVs in its class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This new regular-wheelbase Expedition’s increased size, plus its lightweight aluminum design are good reasons to consider it over the full-size SUV segment’s best-selling Chevrolet Tahoe/GMC Yukon duo, while all of these truck-based SUVs are more often chosen over their unibody car-based crossover counterparts due to passenger carrying capability and their load hauling/trailering mastery, so additional size is a very good thing in this class. 

This newest Expedition’s bigger dimensions allow for an even roomier interior than the previous generation’s sizeable proportions, while the cargo area grows to a maximum of 2,962 litres in regular length, or 3,439 litres with the Expedition Max, the latter providing 477 litres of additional luggage space than the regular Expedition. This means you can load in 4×8 sheets of building material with the tailgate shut. 

Some of the Expedition’s additional cargo dimensions include 1,627 litres behind the second row of the regular wheelbase, and 2,077 litres behind that in the Max, or alternatively 1,800 and 2,254 litres respectively for the same area when the second row is slid all the way forward, while lastly it measures 546 litres and 972 litres behind the regular- and long-wheelbase models’ third row respectively, or 593 and 1,019 litres in their rearmost compartments when the third row is fully upright. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
The new Expedition looks sharp from front to rear. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

By the way, both second- and third-row seatbacks can be powered upwards and downwards individually from a set of rocker switches on the left-side cargo wall, which is a truly helpful feature in such a big SUV. I should mention here that the two powered rows are only standard with Limited and Platinum trims, whereas this PowerFold feature only benefits the third row in the base XLT model. All rows fold completely flat no matter the trim, however, so you’ll be able to fit all types of cargo inside, while having a better chance of keeping them upright en route. 

Compared to the Tahoe/Yukon and Suburban/Yukon XL it’s easy to see the Expedition and Expedition Max are considerably more accommodating, with the GM utilities’ shorter wheelbase model’s 2,682 litres of maximum cargo space shy by a shocking 280 litres, its 1,464-litre capacity aft of its second row falling short by 163 litres, and its 433 litres of luggage space behind the third row off by 160 litres. 

As for the Suburban, its 3,446 litres of total luggage volume is actually 7 litres larger than the Max’s maximum (which is more or less a wash), while the 2,172 litres behind its second row make it less accommodating by 82 litres, although the big GM climbs back with 94 litres of additional storage space behind the third row due to 1,113 litres of total cargo capacity. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
Limited trim adds attractive chrome details, while an extra package includes LED headlights and fog lamps, plus 22-inch alloys. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

If trailering is more important to your needs, you’ll be happy to learn that the regular wheelbase Expedition shown here can now tow up to 4,218 kilos (9,300 lbs) when outfitted with its $1,400 Heavy-Duty Trailer Tow Package (the base model is good for 4,173 kg or 9,200 lbs with the same upgrade), which is better than its predecessor by 45 kg (100 lbs), plus these numbers are best-in-class by a significant margin. Standard towing features include trailer sway control, which works together with AdvanceTrac traction control and Roll Stability Control (RSC) in order to maintain best-possible command of both SUV and trailer. 

Again, putting the Expedition up against the current Tahoe/Yukon shows 3,900 kg (8,600 lbs) of towing capacity, but that’s with the two GM models’ strongest rear-wheel drive layout. The Expedition comes standard with four-wheel drive in Canada, requiring us to compare it to both Tahoe and Yukon 4×4 models that can still only manage 3,810 kg (8,400 lbs) apiece, a whopping 408 kg (900 lbs) less capable than the base Expedition. The Expedition Max tromps all over the Suburban/Yukon XL duo too, its towing maximum of 4,082 kg (9,000 lbs) much more convincing than the two GM utilities’ 3,765 litres (8,300 lbs) in two-wheel drive or 3,629 kg (8,000 lbs) in more directly competitive four-wheel drive. The obvious advantage goes to Ford and its Expedition. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
You’ll likely be impressed with the latest Expedition’s interior. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

A good reason for the Expedition’s trailering prowess comes down to its updated twin-turbocharged 3.5-litre Ecoboost V6, which is now good for a robust 375 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque in base XLT and mid-range Limited trims, the latter version shown here on this page, while an even more formidable version makes 400 horsepower and 480 lb-ft of torque when stuffed under the hood of the top-line Platinum model. These two different versions of this well-proven Ford powerplant come mated to a completely new 10-speed automatic transmission that, improved upon via standard idle start/stop technology capable of automatically turning off the engine when it would otherwise be idling, and then immediately restarting it when lifting your foot from the brake, delivers much greater fuel-efficiency than the previous Expedition. 

Once again, comparing the Tahoe/Yukon twins shows a 20-horsepower and 87-lb-ft disadvantage for GM when its two utilities are outfitted with their base 5.3-litre V8 engines, both of which join up with a dependable yet less advanced six-speed automatic transmission, whereas the top-tier GM engine is a gargantuan 6.2-litre V8 that interestingly mates up to a version of the identical 10-speed automatic used for the Expedition (both Ford and GM intelligently developed this sophisticated transmission in unison so as to save costs), this combination allowing for 20 more horsepower than the top-level Ecoboost engine, but alas 20 lb-ft less torque. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
Comfortable and well designed, the Expedition offers a lot for the money. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Notably, the Expedition’s 10-speed gearbox truly reduces fuel economy, something I witnessed firsthand during my weeklong test. In fact, I had no problem nearing Transport Canada’s official rating of 14.1 L/100km in the city, 10.6 on the highway and 12.5 combined when I eased up on the gas pedal, which compares favourably against the heavier steel-bodied 2017 Expedition that labored along with a comparatively archaic six-speed automatic (just like the current base GM utes) and therefore could only manage 15.9 L/100km in the city, 12.0 on the highway and 14.2 combined in regular length guise. This new lightweight Expedition is much more fuel-friendly than the 2019 Tahoe 4×4’s best rating too, that model only good for 15.8 L/100km in the city, 11.1 on the highway and 13.7 combined, despite the Expedition’s much greater power advantage. 

Similarly, the long-wheelbase 2019 Expedition Max enjoys a rating of just 14.7 L/100km in the city, 11.2 on the highway and 13.1 combined, beating its steel-bodied predecessor that could only manage a 16.1, 12.2 and 14.3 rating respectively, whereas the best rating a new Suburban/Yukon XL 4×4 can do is just 16.8 L/100km in the city, 11.3 on the highway and 14.3 combined, which is worse than the previous Expedition Max when driven around town. Also interesting, there’s no noted difference in fuel efficiency when comparing the base 375-hp Ecoboost engine to the more potent 400-hp version, but not so for the larger optional 6.2-litre V8 in the GM utilities that experience a slight increase in consumption to 16.4 L/100km city, 10.7 highway and 13.8 combined, or 17.1, 11.3 and 14.5 respectively. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
The Explorer’s standard 8.0-inch multi-information display is large and graphically stimulating. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Together with standard four-wheel drive, the latest Expedition also comes with a version of the Explorer’s terrain management system, which allows a choice of driving styles, plus the capability of maximizing traction on all types of road and trail surfaces, and the ability to set this SUV up to either tow a trailer, or have the Expedition towed behind an even larger vehicle like an RV, all from a rotating dial on the console. 

I spent most of my time with the Expedition on pavement, and while doing so found its standard V6 enjoyably smooth, but interestingly a nice V8-like soundtrack complemented the experience. Stomp on the gas pedal and it feels even better than most V8s thanks to all the horsepower and torque noted earlier, so I must admit this would be my personal choice in this segment, unless Ford chose to offer a Powerstroke diesel in the Expedition at some point in the future—fingers crossed. 

I think the new 10-speed automatic might be even smoother than the V6. In fact, if it weren’t for all the upward and downward shifts I’d be questioning whether Ford had stuffed a continuously variable gearless box into its transmission housing, but then again it responds much better than a CVT would digging deep into the throttle, at which point it provides nice quick downshifts, albeit never deviating from its silky-smooth demeanor. Also, I never once tried to defeat the auto idle start/stop system mentioned earlier, as it always shut down quickly at stoplights and restarted without hesitation, so why not benefit from the fuel savings? 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
The Sync 3 infotainment interface remains one of the best of its kind. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

You might be starting to notice a rather smooth theme as this review moves along, and to that end the Expedition’s suspension is no different. It soaks up dips, bumps and other types of road irregularities no matter the surface below or surrounding weather conditions, and was therefore wonderfully through town, on the highway and most everywhere else, even when testing on a few gravel roads and unkempt trails. I personally think the Expedition is at its best on the freeway, where it’s ability to cruise comfortably all day long is hard to beat, this skill made all the more enjoyable thanks to a capable dynamic cruise control system. This is where I also appreciated the Expedition’s very low road and wind noise. 

Another positive is the Expedition’s performance around edgier curves, this partially due to a fully independent multi-link rear suspension setup that especially adds confidence over rough pavement mid-corner. Unlike the Expedition, all directly competitive GM utilities use a comparatively old-school non-independent solid rear axle design. 

Despite its size, the Expedition was fairly agile through busy city traffic, this aided by the superb visibility granted by a tall ride-height. Parallel parking downtown, or for that matter trying to find a large enough space in a parking garage, can be a bit challenging, yet most people I know that own one of these full-size SUVs also have a smaller car for zipping around town. If you’re reading this from a rural area, just ignore my inner-city ramblings, as you’ll rarely need to worry about this problem. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
The detail of some of the switchgear is impressive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Together with the Expedition’s impressive performance and luxurious ride comes an interior that’s improved so significantly since its previous generation that I was truly questioning whether Ford still needed its Lincoln Navigator, at least before spending a week with the latter. Yes, the new Navigator has come a long way too, thanks to real hardwood and plenty of premium materials all around, which more than make up for the $12k or so price premium required to step up to a similarly equipped model. I wouldn’t need all the highfalutin trim in my family hauler, but rather found my Expedition Limited test model wonderfully comfortable. 

In fact, its driver’s seat that was about as supportive as this full-size segment gets, only including two-way lumbar support, but to Ford’s credit it powered in and out precisely where it was needed to fill the small of my back, so you won’t hear any complaints from me. I also found the seat’s lower cushion cupped nicely under my knees, but it made me wonder whether those with shorter legs might find this uncomfortable. 

Looking back to Expedition Limited materials quality in the cabin, Ford finished off most of the dash top in an attractive, soft-touch stitched and padded leatherette, and continued with this premium material around the sides of the primary gauge cluster, on a separate horizontal strip ahead of the front passenger, and across the tops of the door uppers front and back, while each armrest was well padded too. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
These aren’t the top-line seats, but we’d be fully satisfied. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

My Limited model’s woodgrain was treated to an authentic looking matte finish, but I have to say Ford didn’t even attempt to make it feel like the real deal. I suppose this is how Ford has detailed out the Expedition since inception, so I doubt anyone will complain, and besides if you want a more luxurious version you can always move up to the new Navigator as I noted before. One item I appreciate more in the Expedition than in the Navigator is its knurled metal rotating gear selector, which is much more intuitive than the newest Lincoln’s row of pushbuttons. 

Next to the rotating gear selector is a smaller knurled metal dial for choosing drive modes, filled with Normal, Eco, Sport, Tow/Haul, Mud and Ruts, Sand, and Grass/Gravel/Snow settings. I slotted it into Normal mode most of the time, but found Eco mode just as good for driving through town amid congested traffic, while I’m guessing it helped at the pump too. 

Eco mode slows the 10-speed automatic’s shift increments and doesn’t let it hold gears as long, amongst other functions, while when sprinting quickly off the line it still provided plenty of punch. Sport mode, on the other hand, doesn’t allow the auto start-stop function to work and therefore won’t save as much fuel, but the engine was always ready to get up and go from standstill, while the transmission’s shift points were higher within the engine’s rev range, resulting in stronger straight-line acceleration. Also notable, with Sport mode set yet while driving more relaxed, the transmission didn’t merely hold a given gear for no apparent reason, and thus keep engine revs too high. This proved the new 10-speed is a lot smarter than many other multi-speed transmissions I’ve driven. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
A nice big powered panoramic sunroof sheds a lot of natural light in from above. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Also good, the gauge cluster’s tachometer dial includes a well-conceived vertical readout showing all 10 gears moving up and down in a cool digital graphic as they slot into place. The two analogue dials bookend a large 8.0-inch standard multi-information display that’s ultra-high in resolution, filled with a stunning array of stylish graphics that wow eyeballs with beautiful contrast and depths of colour. Its functions include an off-road status panel featuring an inclinometer and more, plus a real-time fuel-economy average gauge that displayed a scary 18.3 L/100km while I was taking these notes (which was fortunately not my average throughout the test week), a comprehensive trip mileage panel, some engine information including driving hours and idle hours (my test model showed 209 total hours, of which 63 were idling, so it’s easy to see the need for an idle start-stop system in a vehicle like this), a turbo boost gauge, plus more. 

If you haven’t familiarized yourself with Ford’s Sync 3 infotainment touchscreen system then I’m guessing you haven’t read many of my other Ford reviews, because I’ve been an advocate of this system since it debuted a number of years ago. I won’t say it’s still the best in the mainstream volume sector, but I believe it once was and now remains one of the best infotainment systems around, continuing into this latest Expedition with its great looking sky-blue, grey and white minimalist graphics plus easy to understand commands, as well as its bucket-load of useful features that include superbly accurate navigation and, in the case of my test model, a wonderfully helpful parking camera with a regular reverse screen and a separate overhead view. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
The second-row buckets provide good comfort and access to the rear down the middle. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Impressively, each and every Expedition trim comes standard with sensational 12-speaker Bang & Olufsen audio, while this system’s controls are once again comprised of knurled metal dials and tight-fitting buttons. The HVAC system’s controls are equally well designed, featuring temperature readouts within the middle of each dial. Almost all of the Expedition’s switchgear is well made, tightly fitted with minimal spacing, and damped well for a premium experience, with only its steering wheel buttons feeling a bit on the low-rent side. 

I wouldn’t go searching for premium-level composite materials below the interior’s beltline either, because Ford didn’t even finish the glove box lid in a padded plastic, but chose a shiny hard shell covering instead. I can imagine some owners might be happier with such hard and more durable plastics, especially along the lower door panels, these feeling rugged enough to withstand kicks aplenty. You won’t need to worry about getting the A-pillar dirty from sooty gloves or unwashed hands either, as Ford didn’t wrap it, or any of the Expedition’s pillars, in fabric. Those wanting a more premium experience should once again be looking up to the Lincoln Navigator. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
Rear passengers have control of their environment and more. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This said the Expedition’s passenger compartment is every bit as spacious as the Navigator’s, or for that matter any other SUV in the full-size class. My test model featured second-row bucket seats instead of the usual three-position bench, with the former providing a wide thoroughfare in between so that children can climb into the rearmost row. Alternatively, you can tilt either bucket forward to access the third row, which might be handier if used by larger teens or adults. The Expedition is actually first in the full-size SUV segment to include this type of a tip-and-slide second-row feature, incidentally—impressive. Also good is a third row that’s at least as comfortable and accommodating as any minivan. 

Second-row comfort is even better, plus the fortunate two or three enjoying the Expedition’s mid-section have control of a comprehensive rear automatic HVAC and audio system panel attached to the back of the front console. It includes two USB ports, a three-prong 110-volt household-type plug for a laptop, entertainment/gaming device or whatever else you may want to keep charged up, as well as switchgear for the heatable seats, etcetera. Meanwhile, those third-row passengers noted a moment ago have the ability to use the sidewall-mounted power-folding seat controls to recline their backrests, while they can also plug in devices via optional USB charge points, will benefit from excellent air vents overhead, and enjoy clear views out each large side window, while a gigantic panoramic sunroof provides natural light from above. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
These tilt-and-slide second-row seats are a first for the full-size SUV class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Some Expedition technology worth noting includes an available wireless device charger (if you have a smartphone new enough to make use of it), Wi-Fi hotspot capability, and rear-seat entertainment, my tester boasting a monitor on the backside of each front headrest. All in all the Expedition offers up six USB ports, four 12-volt power outlets, and the 110-volt socket just mentioned, while Ford also provides a whopping 17 cupholders throughout. 

The base XLT model, starting at $53,978 and set up for eight occupants, gets a lot of standard equipment including a set of 18-inch machine-finished alloys, fog lights, black running boards, black roof rails with black crossbars, Ford’s unique SecuriCode entry keypad, MyKey, an illuminated entry system with approach lamps, pushbutton ignition, rear parking sonar, a leather-clad steering wheel, a windshield wiper de-icer, an eight-way power-adjustable driver’s seat, an auto-dimming centre mirror, a sunglasses holder and conversation mirror within the overhead console, a universal garage door opener, tri-zone auto climate control, the aforementioned Sync 3 infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a reverse camera system, navigation with detailed mapping, voice control, the 12-speaker Bang & Olufsen audio system mentioned before, satellite radio, power rear quarter windows, flip-up tailgate glass, a cargo management system, power-folding third-row seatbacks, a capless Easy Fuel filler, a Class IV trailer hitch receiver with wiring, tire pressure monitoring, the SOS Post-Crash Alert system, all the normal active and passive safety systems, plus a great deal more. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
Comfortable third row is about as roomy as family SUVs get. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As-tested Limited trim begins at $65,288 and features 20-inch alloy wheels, a few more chrome exterior trim highlights such as the fog lamp bezels and door handles, bright stainless steel roof rails, LED tail lamps, a remote engine starter, proximity-sensing keyless access, power-deployable running boards in body-colour with polished stainless steel trim, power-folding exterior mirrors with auto-dimming on the driver’s side, ambient interior lighting, the previously noted woodgrain inlays, a power-adjustable steering column, powered foot pedals, driver’s memory, a heated steering wheel, 10-way power-adjustable front seats with heated and ventilated cushions, perforated leather upholstery, the heated second-row outboard seats with Tip-and-Slide and PowerFold capability noted earlier (albeit laid out in a 40/20/40-split bench design), the powered panoramic sunroof, a Connectivity package including the aforementioned wireless smartphone charging, plus a FordPass Connect 4G WiFi modem, and the two smart-charging USB ports in the third row, plus Limited trim also includes yet more first- and second-row (plus cargo area) power points, a foot-activated motion-sensing powered liftgate, front parking sonar, blindspot monitoring with cross-traffic assist, trailer-tow monitoring, etcetera. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
There’s plenty of room behind the third row, but if you need more Ford offers the Max. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

My test model was upgraded with a $5,000 302A package too, enhancing the wheels to 22 inches, adding LED headlights, plus LED fog lamps, and a comprehensive Driver’s Assistance Package that would otherwise cost an additional $1,200 yet adds auto high beams, rain-sensing wipers, dynamic cruise control with stop-and-go, forward collision warning, pre-collision assist autonomous braking and pedestrian detection, lane keeping warning and mitigation, driver alert, the dual-screen surround parking camera noted before, and an enhanced self-parking system. 

As mentioned earlier, Platinum trim is top-of-the-line and at $72,552 it includes everything from the 302A package as well as another set of 22-inch alloys, a special satin-finish mesh grille insert, more satin-aluminum exterior detailing such as the mirror housings and door handle accents, upscale brushed aluminum scuff plates on the doorsills, multi-contour front seats like those used for the Navigator (even featuring Active Motion massage), second-row safety seatbelts that self-inflate during an accident, plus more. 

Take note that all pricing was sourced right here on CarCostCanada, where you’ll find full detailed information about trims, packages and standalone options, as well as otherwise hard to find rebate information and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

2019 Ford Expedition Limited 4x4
Both rear rows power down via buttons on the cargo sidewall, and provide an incredible amount of loading space when they do. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

While there was once a time when $54k to $72k might have seemed like a lot to pay for nothing more than a truck-based SUV, Ford has changed all that with an Expedition that reaches far above its predecessors and most anything else this side of the luxury class, and I must say makes all of its aforementioned GM competitors look like they’re lacking by comparison. When realizing the Tahoe, Yukon, Suburban and Yukon XL all start higher in price than the Expedition, and then factoring in Ford’s more potent and efficient powertrains, more advanced (Land/Range Rover-derived) Terrain Management 4×4 system, more sophisticated fully-independent suspension, lightweight aluminum body, easier third-row access, greater cargo capacity, etcetera, etcetera, there’s no way that combined 2018 calendar year sales of the four GM utilities should be more than four times higher (11,629 Tahoes, Yukons, Suburbans and Yukon XLs to 2,798 Expeditions). It seems that Ford has made up a little ground over the first five months of 2019, with 2,007 deliveries compared to 4,617 unit sales of the GM utes, but the Expedition should still be doing better. 

Of course, Ford shouldn’t feel too badly. Its Expedition isn’t suffering from the Nissan Armada’s hardly noticeable 321 unit January through May sales total, or the Toyota Sequoia’s even weaker 248 deliveries over the same five months, while the Explorer is now so good that word is bound to get out to Tahoe, Suburban and Yukon owners that won’t want to feel shortchanged when it comes time to trade in their current rides. We’ll just have to wait to see how GM answers back when it comes time to update the fourth-generation of these four utilities in 2020. Until then, the Ford Expedition is the best this full-size mainstream volume-branded segment has to offer. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

Go Electric in These Modern, Eco-Friendly Rides!

Going electric – what seemed like only a mere dream a decade ago is now a reality we can all take part in. Electric vehicles are so prevalent on Canadian roads, it’s hard NOT to spot one. Why are electric vehicles all the rage all of a sudden? It’s no surprise that electric vehicles are beneficial to the planet, however, most consumers are unaware that they are beneficial when it comes to the checkbook as well. The cost of “charging is significantly lower than the cost of filling up a tank and with copious amounts of rebates offered, the ability to save money is highly present.

 

Electric cars are a great option for commuters with varying budgets and needs. No two electric vehicles are the same. If you’re considering an EV, here are the best new car deals Canada has to offer:

 

Nissan Leaf

 

If you’re looking for something compact, functional, and affordable, the Leaf has it ALL. The new and improved Nissan Leaf has a range of 242 km on a single charge, making it a great option if you like to take those long, summer cruises. The Leaf is also a compact vehicle, making it easy to navigate the city and find parking spots in even the smallest of places. Its hp sits just under 150. While speed isn’t it’s forte, it makes up for it with its safety and longevity. The Leaf starts just over $35,000 for the base model, making it an affordable option in the EV world.

 

Go for it if: you are looking for a functional EV that can go the distance

 

Move on if: you want a faster, sportier vehicle

 

Smart Fortwo

 

Owning a large car with ample seating is grounds for you becoming the taxi service for your friends and family. One day you’re dropping a friend off down the street, the next day you’re dropping your co-workers off 30km away. How can you solve that issue? A Smart Car! The Smart Fortwo is a two-seater vehicle with limited space. In 2018, the Fortwo went fully electric in North America. The range may be limited, at 155km on a single charge, but another excuse for not having to drop people off around the city! The Smart Fortwo is an excellent option for city drivers, especially those in cities such as Toronto or Vancouver City where traffic is heavy a majority of the time. If parking isn’t your specialty, this vehicle will make it a breeze!

Go for it if: you are tired of being the chauffeur for everyone 

 

Move on if: you want to buy more than two bags worth of groceries – this EV has very limited cargo space 

 

Jaguar I-PACE

 

Luxury, comfort, space, power – the best way to describe the Jaguar I-PACE. This luxury class vehicle has a spacious interior and a sleek exterior. From family road trips to city cruising, the I-PACE can do it all. When we said power, we weren’t kidding – the I-PACE has 394 hp and can go from 0-100km/h in 4.8 seconds. The hp isn’t the only impressive stat this vehicle has to offer. The I-PACE has a range of 386km on a single charge, making it a great road trip ride! All these impressive stats, however, come with a hefty price tag. The Jaguar I-PACE starts at just over $89,000. What it lacks in affordability, it certainly makes up for in power, space, and style.

 

Go for it if: you are looking for a spacious EV with a sporty feel to it

 

Move on if: you don’t want to fork over (at least) $90k for a car

 

Kia Soul EV

 

Want a vehicle with space but don’t want to spend an arm and a leg? The Kia Soul EV is here to save the day! It may be classed as a compact vehicle, but it certainly has a lot of room! The Kia Soul EV also has a very unique look to it, perfect if you want to stand out on the roads. With a range of 179km on a single charge, the Soul EV is perfect for city commuters. The output of the vehicle does pale in comparison to the other models mentioned, at 109hp, however, the higher end models go as high as 201 hp. The Soul starts at just under $43,000 dollars and with all its new aged features, it’s well worth!

 

Go for it if: you are a city commuter who doesn’t spend a ton of time driving

 

Move on if: you want an all-wheel-drive vehicle – the Soul EV only comes in front-wheel-drive currently

 

BMW i3

 

There’s no denying, German engineering is top-tier and they continued to bring that quality with the i3. The i3 is the fully electric sister to the BMW i8 which is a hybrid. Compared to the i8, it is also a fraction of the price, starting just under $45,000. The i3 has a range of 200km, making it a great ride for daily commuters. Just like the non-electric BMWs, the i3 has a touch of class on every inch of it, with a sleek and modern interior and unique exterior. Canadian drives, however, must take note of the fact that the i3 only comes as a rear-wheel-drive option currently. While this does make it a more powerful sports vehicle, it can be a little difficult to navigate in the winter. With that being said, it hits the standards of all BMWs in that it is a fun, thrilling vehicle.

 

Go for it if: you want a luxury vehicle at an economical price

 

Move on if: you do a lot of driving in the winter – RWD is not ideal for harsh conditions

 

With the EV market growing, more and more manufacturers are hopping on board creating their own electric or hybrid models. It once seemed that the only electric vehicle on the market was Tesla, however, nowadays, the options are superfluous and EVs are becoming more and more affordable for the everyday driver.

 

Looking to make the switch to electric? Get your FREE Dealer Invoice Report today and save big on your EV purchase!

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 now available to order

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Thanks to 414-hp and plenty of performance upgrades the new 2020 718 Cayman GT4 is the most capable of its kind yet. (Photo: Porsche)

Decades ago Porsche was criticized for not making entry-level models that measured up to the much mightier 911, examples being the now 50-year-old ‘69-‘76 mid-engine 914 and ‘76–‘88 front-engine 924, but since the mid-engine Boxster convertible and Cayman coupe arrived on the scene, complainants haven’t been anywhere near as vocal. 

Just the same, the brand’s new line of turbocharged flat-four powerplants that arrived in the current fourth-gen 718 series models have had their share of naysayers, yet while these engines’ barks aren’t quite as vicious sounding as the flat-six 911’s meatier growl, the 2.5-litre mill’s bite has kept most critics silent, particularly when tuned to GTS heights. 

With respect to the 986, 987, 981 and today’s 982 platform architectures, the Cayman and Boxster were near perfect performers from the very beginning thanks to their relatively light curb weights and inherently well-balanced mid-engine layouts, and every generation became even better at managing high-speed road and racetrack performance. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
Choose the 718 Spyder if going topless in the quickest and most stylish Boxster ever is more to your liking. (Photo: Porsche)

As with the previous-gen Boxster and Cayman, the 718 series’ many more fans should also be happy to know that 2020 models are about to be built in their most formidable production trims yet, the upcoming 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 even capable of sprinting away from and outmaneuvering some 911 models. 

To fill you in on some background information, the 718 Cayman (currently on sale from $63,700), can be had in base 300-horsepower Cayman trim that’s capable of zero to 100km/h in just 5.1 seconds, or 4.9 seconds when hooked up to its optional paddle shift-operated dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission, or a speedy 4.7 seconds with the PDK and the car’s available Sport Chrono Package, while if you keep its right pedal planted it can hit a top track speed of 275 km/h. 

The entry-level coupe can also be upgraded to 350-horsepower Cayman S trim ($78,600), which can spirit away from standstill to 100km/h in only 4.6, 4.4 and 4.2 seconds respectively, plus it tops out at an even higher 285 km/h, while lastly the 365-horsepower Cayman GTS ($92,600) is capable of running from 0 to 100km/h in 4.6, 4.3 and 4.1 seconds respectively, while it claims a top speed of 290 km/h. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
The 718 Cayman GT4 has a massive rear wing. (Photo: Porsche)

The just-noted 718 Cayman GT4 arrives at the top of this pecking order, just like the previous version did when introduced in 2015. Where the old Cayenne (and Boxster) had flat-six engines throughout its range, the new GT4 replaces the 718’s 2.0- and 2.5-litre turbocharged flat-four engines with a downgraded (but still amazing) version of the wonderfully high-revving naturally-aspirated 4.0-litre H-6 from the 911 GT3, producing a generous 414-horsepower and 309 lb-ft of torque, which is a 29-hp bump over the previous GT4 due in part to a sonorous 8,000-rpm redline, while it’s solely conjoined to a six-speed manual transmission just like the 911 GT3, all combining for a zero to 100km/h sprint time of 4.4 seconds, plus a terminal velocity of 304 km/h. 

As for the 718 Spyder, which also updates a previous 2016 model, it shares all of the same mechanical bits as the Cayman GT4. This means it’s 39 hp more potent than the outgoing Spyder, resulting in the same 4.4-second 100-km/h sprint time as the Cayman GT4, although its top speed is fractionally lower at 301 km/h. Unlike the GT4, mind you, the open-top Spyder is quite different than the model using the Boxster nameplate, despite housed in its basic tub. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
The 718 Spyder gets two “streamliners” on its backside as well as an auto-deploying spoiler. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the two new cars’ utilize a six-speed manual gearbox, which isn’t all that unusual in the class, but interestingly this transmission includes downshift rev-matching, or rather what Porsche refers to as an “Auto Blip” function, which automatically matches a given cog to engine speed when dropping a gear. Fortunately, Porsche makes this feature optional, in that a driver can individually activate or defeat it via a button. Also standard, both new models feature a totally new and exclusively designed sport exhaust system that works its way around the cars’ complex rear diffusers while making the most of the “exciting flat-six sound of the engine,” noted Porsche in its press release. 

With respect to the two models’ outward designs, some key elements of the 718 Spyder appear like they were pulled from the 918 Spyder, not to mention the more recently introduced 911 Speedster. The 918 may have helped to inspire the 718 Spyder’s lower front fascia and similar, albeit much more pronounced, double-hump rear deck lid buttresses, while the new 911 Speedster may have influenced the 718 Spyder’s aggressive frontal treatment and double-bubble rear deck “streamliners”, as well as the new convertible’s vented hood, the “Spyder” lettering on its shortened B-pillars (which read “Speedster” on the 911), the similarly sculpted automatically-deploying rear spoiler, and the working rear diffuser. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Aerodynamics play a key role with both new 718 cars. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 718 Cayman GT4, on the other hand, pulls forward a number of similar styling cues and aero details from its 2016 predecessor, including the aggressively shaped front fascia, the horizontal black strip of hood venting, the large fixed rear wing, the wind-cheating rear diffuser, and the uniquely designed alloys, all developed with a focus on minimizing weight and maximizing downforce. The fact Porsche even painted both GT4 launch cars in a seemingly identical yellow hue is no coincidence either, just like they once again coated the latest 718 Spyder launch model in white. 

With an eye looking back to aerodynamics, each and every 718 Cayman GT4 exterior upgrade combines for 50 percent greater downforce with no negative affects on drag. Most of the aero advantages can be attributed to the new diffuser and rear wing elements, the latter feature good for 20-percent greater aero-efficiency than the outgoing GT4 wing. At the other end of the car, a deep lip spoiler joins up with air curtains to each side, this helping to channel air around the front wheels. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
Both models get unique interior trims, including plenty of soft Alcantara psuede. (Photo: Porsche)

Now with our focus on the 718 Spyder’s aero upgrades, its adaptive rear wing automatically powers upwards at 120 km/h, but unlike the conventional 718 Boxster’s retractable fabric roof, the Spyder’s top doesn’t benefit from electrical assistance, but instead requires manual removal and stowage below the rear deck cover. When replaced on top of the passenger compartment, Porsche promises a roof that can manage the Spyder’s high top speed without issue, providing full protection from wind, rain and more. 

Behind the scenes, both new models integrate a lightweight, high-performance chassis design that’s capable of keeping the engine and aero capabilities in check. Porsche leaned on its extensive motorsport heritage in order to achieve an ideal balance for the new Spyder and GT4, choosing to equip both with a model-exclusive rear axle, and a front axle adopted from the 2018 911 GT3. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Form-fitting sport seats come standard. (Photo: Porsche)

Additional standard features include Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), providing a 30-millimetre ride-height reduction when compared to regular 718 models, this lowering the new models’ centre of gravity, thus improving overall handling. Still, owners have the ability to manually adjust the suspensions’ camber, toe, ride-height and anti-roll bar settings, important for those who regularly hone their skills on the track. 

The now legendary 911 GT3 also provided the two new models’ braking setup, including their larger 380-mm cast iron rotors and fixed aluminum calipers, while buyers of either car can choose to upgrade to a set of ceramic composite brakes if desired, these 50-percent lighter and featuring discs that measure 410 mm up front and 390 mm in the rear. Additionally, the 718 Spyder and Cayman GT4 feature specially tuned ABS, electronic stability control (ESC) and traction control (TC) systems that enhance the cars’ performance, with these ESC and TC systems capable of being switched off via a two-stage process. 

Yet more upgrades include a standard mechanical limited-slip differential with Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), plus unique 20-inch alloy rims shod with 245/35ZR20 front and 295/30ZR20 rear UHP rubber. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
The 414-hp flat-six gets an exclusive sport exhaust system. (Photo: Porsche)

As you may have noticed, the many performance upgrades mentioned up to this point don’t necessarily make the new 718 Spyder or 718 Cayman GT4 quicker off the line than GTS versions of either model, but both are faster on the track, and therefore should be better for everyday driving, at least when pushing the limits. With respect to racetrack limits, Porsche claims its new 718 Cayman GT4 is capable of lapping the Nürburgring Nordschleife “more than ten seconds faster than its predecessor.” 

Making the two new models more enjoyable to live with are upgraded interiors that include a special 360-mm GT Sport steering wheel with a cool yellow top-centre “marker” in Cayman GT4 trim. Additionally, both 718 Spyder and Cayman GT4 receive a 20-mm shorter shift lever that provides a “more direct and crisp feel” when changing gears. What’s more, a new Sport Seats Plus package comes standard, boasting seats with larger side bolsters to enhance lateral support, plus suede-like Alcantara inserts to improve backside grip. Alcantara also gets applied to a lower portion of the instrument panel, as well as the shift knob and boot, and the previously mentioned steering wheel rim. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Porsche offers plenty of upgrades, including multi-colour interior accents. (Photo: Porsche)

On top of this, some cabin accents include body-colour trim for the 718 Spyder, and brushed aluminum details for the 718 Cayman GT4, while Porsche offers plenty of available décor upgrades as well. What’s more, you can opt for a set of full bucket seats or an 18-way power-adjustable Adaptive Sport Seats Plus package, but take note you won’t be required to pay more for air conditioning or the brand’s newest Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system that also features Sound Package Plus. This said, a navigation system and Porsche Connect, featuring Apple CarPlay, are optional. 

Also noteworthy, the 718 Spyder can be ordered with a Spyder Classic Interior Package that includes two-tone Bordeaux Red and Black leather upholstery, extended Alcantara, GT silver metallic interior trim, and a two-tone black and red fabric top, the latter “reminiscent of historic Porsche racing cars” says Porsche. Alternatively, red, silver, or yellow contrast stitching is available. 

However you’d like to order yours, I wouldn’t recommend waiting too long as Canada’s allotment will soon be spoken for. They’re currently available to order, with pricing beginning at $110,500 for the 718 Spyder, and $113,800 for the 718 Cayman GT4, plus a freight charge and other fees of course. 

While you’re waiting for your new 2020 718 Spyder or 718 Cayman GT4 to arrive, make sure to check out all the videos Porsche provided below: 

The new Porsche 718 Spyder. Perfectly irrational. (1:03):

The new Porsche 718 Spyder. Product highlights. (2:25):

The new Porsche 718 Cayman GT4. Product highlights. (2:13):

The new Porsche 718 GT4. Perfectly irrational. (1:01):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible Road Test

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
Good looking Mini Cooper S Convertible looks sharp with the top up or down. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Some brands are so small they don’t really get the press they deserve, and Mini fits into that mould both figuratively and literally. 

Ok, I just had a little fun with a small play on words. The just-used term “literally” was straight-forward, in that Mini’s lineup of cars and its single crossover are made up of subcompacts and compacts (they’re small), while the word figuratively should actually be used as a substitute for metaphorically, but instead I improperly chose it for its root word “figure” in order suggest that Mini’s sales figures reside on the smaller side of the scale as well (they only delivered 4,466 3-Door Hatch, 5-Door Hatch, Convertible and Clubman models last year). Clever? Not really. Grasping at straws for a witty opener? Guilty as charged. 

In reality, however, I almost completely forget Mini exists as a brand until checking my schedule on a given Sunday evening, at which point I’m reminded that one of their cars will be in my weeklong possession starting the following day. That’s when I get giddy with excitement and start planning my week to make sure I have time to drive somewhere unpopulated on the side of a body of water (ocean, lake or river), a mountain, or anywhere else with ribbons of winding black asphalt. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
Classic Mini lines never go out of style. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Truly, their cars are so much fun they’re addictive, especially when the model loaned out is tuned to “S” specification or better, and has its hardtop replaced by a slick power-operated retractable cloth top. Such is the car before you, the 2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible, which is upgraded further with this year’s special $2,900 Starlight Blue Edition Package, meaning that it receives a special coat of stunning Starlight Blue Metallic paint, as well as unique 17-inch machine-finished Rail Spoke alloys featuring black painted pockets on 205/45 all-season runflat rubber, piano Black Line exterior trim replacing most of the chrome, including the front grille surround plus headlamp, taillight and outside mirror surrounds, etcetera. 

The “more” that I just noted includes rain-sensing automatic on/off LED headlights with active cornering, LED fog lamps, piano black lacquered interior detailing, a two-zone auto HVAC system, an accurate Connected Navigation Plus GPS routing system housed within Mini’s already superb infotainment system, a wonderful sounding Harman Kardon audio system, Sirius/XM satellite radio, stylish Carbon Black leatherette upholstery, and heated front seat cushions, while my test model’s only standalone option was a $1,400 six-speed automatic transmission, with all of the above upping the Mini Cooper S Convertible base price of $33,990 to $38,290, plus a destination charge and additional fees. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
The Starlight Blue Edition Package gets special paint, unique 17-inch Rail Spoke alloy wheels, and lots of piano Black Line exterior trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be clear, you can purchase the new 2019 Mini Cooper Convertible (sans S) for as little as $29,640 before any discount, or you can spend the slightly pricier amount noted above for my tester’s sportier and more feature-filled “S” trim. Alternatively, you could choose a base 3-Door Hatch (hardtop) for as little as $23,090, while other models in the Mini lineup include the Cooper 5-Door available from $24,390, a six-door Clubman that starts at $28,690, and the Countryman crossover that can be had for as little as $31,090, plus destination charges of course. 

Incidentally, all 2019 Mini prices, including trims, options and standalone features, were sourced right here on CarCostCanada, where you can also get otherwise difficult to find manufacturer rebate info, plus dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

Before I share what makes this Cooper S Convertible and all Minis so enjoyable to live with, I need to focus on the quality of the Mini product overall. Mini’s acceptance as a premium brand is questionable, which makes sense when you can buy one for a mere $23k, but nevertheless quality of materials, fit and finish and features found in each Mini model is much better than average when comparing most subcompact and compact rivals, especially when discussing mainstream brands. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
These Union Jack LED taillights are fabulous. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Just the same, the majority of high-volume compact models have been on a refinement trend as of late, with the most-recent Mazda3 getting closest to premium status without raising its pricing into the stratosphere, but like its compact sedan and hatchback competitors (such as the Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla, Hyundai Elantra, et al) the 3 is quite a bit larger than all Mini models this side of the Clubman and Countryman, and therefore when comparing a regular Cooper to any top-selling mainstream subcompact rival (like a Hyundai Accent, Honda Fit or Toyota Yaris), the Mini’s finishing and performance is on a much higher scale. 

The Cooper S Convertible before you, for example, is very well made, from its outer fit to its inner detailing. The paint finish is excellent and other exterior embellishments impressive, from my tester’s eye-catching LED headlamps and Union Jack-emblazoned taillights, to its nicely crafted leather-clad steering wheel and stitched leather-wrapped shift knob, as well as its primary instrument pods hovering overtop the steering column, the ever-changing circle of colour lights rounding the high-definition 8.8-inch infotainment display, the row of brightly chromed toggles and red ignition switch in the middle of the centre stack, and the similarly retrospective line of toggles overhead, it’s a car that completely separates itself from everything else on the market. Those who love retro-cool designs and brilliantly artistic attention to detail will adore today’s Minis. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
Mini’s interiors are top notch. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As grand as everything about this car sounds so far, the Mini Cooper S Convertible is at its best when in its element, on the road—prefe¬rably a winding road. S trimmed Coopers begin with a sonorously high-revving 16-valve twin-scroll turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine capable of 189 horsepower and 207 lb-ft of torque, which is a sizeable 55 hp and 45 lb-ft more than the base Cooper’s 1.5-litre three-cylinder turbocharged powerplant. This allows the S to slice 1.6 seconds off of the base model’s 0 to 100km/h acceleration time, dropping it from 8.8 to 7.2 seconds with the manual, or from 8.7 to 7.1 with my tester’s six-speed automatic transmission. 

If more speed is still required you can ante up for the John Cooper Works Convertible, which reduces its zero to 100km/h time down to 6.5 seconds by way of a more formidable 228 horsepower version of the 2.0-litre TwinPower Turbo four-cylinder engine, featuring a much more robust 236 lb-ft of torque. It starts much higher up the affordability ladder at $41,490, yet thanks to sport suspension improvements that include larger wheels and tires, plus more standard styling, luxury and convenience upgrades, most Mini fans will find it well worth the price of entry. 

Then again, even the mighty John Cooper Works won’t cause Honda Civic Type R drivers to quiver from fear in their form-fitting Recaro racing seats, but lower the roof and drop the clutch of a JCW or this Cooper S Convertible and you’ll quickly be enjoying your drive much more than you might expect, while never worrying about draining the bank account at the pump. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
Love these instrument pods. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Mini claims a very reasonable fuel economy rating of 10.2 L/100km city, 7.4 highway and 9.0 combined with the manual, or 9.4, 7.2 and 8.4 respectively with the automatic when upgraded to S trim, while the base Cooper Convertible manages a mere 8.4 L/100km in the city, 6.3 on the highway and 7.5 combined with its manual, or 8.8, 6.8 and 7.9 respectively with its autobox. 

Together with the performance upgrade, going from base to Cooper S adds some performance-focused items like default “MID”, “GREEN” and “SPORT” driver-selectable modes, the latter perfect for boosting takeoff and enhancing responsiveness all-round, while Mini also provides this trim with sportier front seats featuring heated cushions. And just in case going topless isn’t your thing, hardtop Cooper S trims receive a big panoramic sunroof as standard equipment. 

That just-noted Sport mode does a great job of increasing the Cooper S Convertible’s get-up-and-go while enhancing the quick-shifting nature of its transmission, while take note that its front-wheel drive system is never overpowered from torque steer, even when pounding on the throttle from an angled standing start. Those who read me often will know that I’d rather have any Mini with the brand’s wonderfully notchy manual gearbox, but nevertheless this automatic delivered strong performance while its manual mode, despite only being swappable via the gear lever, is plenty responsive. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
Mini’s infotainment system features a crystal clear high-definition display. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Yes, that means it has no steering wheel mounted paddles, which is strange for this sportier S model. The current JCW autobox doesn’t come with paddle-shifters either, but reportedly Mini will rectify this shortcoming in 2020 with respect to the Clubman and Countryman JCW models, which are said to be fitted with a new eight-speed auto and much quicker 301-hp 2.0-litre engine making 331 lb-ft of torque, so it’s possible that in time we’ll see paddles on lesser trims as well. As it is, I left the autobox to its own devices more often than not, being that it shifts smoothly and was therefore ideal for congested city streets. Still, when the road opened up and consecutive curves arrived I found that manual mode significantly increased the fun factor, while helping to increase control. 

Just like with all Minis, the Cooper S Convertible comes standard with a brilliantly sorted fully independent front strut and multi-link rear suspension setup that can humble most front-drive rivals, other than those enjoying the aforementioned Civic Type R. Still, it slices and dices up serpentine tarmac like it’s some sort of front-drive BMW, jest intended. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
We love all the retro-cool toggle switches. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Those in the know (yes, we car nerds) will already be aware that second-generation Minis share UKL platform underpinnings with some modern-day BMWs. To be clear, however, the UKL platform is divided into UKL1 and UKL2 architectures, the former only used for Minis thus far (including the 3- and 5-door F56 Hatch plus this F57 Convertible), and the latter for larger Minis (the F54 Clubman and F60 Countryman) as well as the global-market BMW 1 Series Sedan (F52), 1 Series 5-door hatch (F40), 2 Series Active Tourer (F45), 2 Series Gran Tourer (F46), X1 crossover SUV (F48), X2 crossover coupe (F39) and Brilliance-BMW Zinoro 60H (a Chinese-market X1/F48 crossover with unique sheetmetal). 

We don’t have the 1 Series or 2 Series Active Tourer here in Canada, and so far I haven’t been able to get behind the wheel of these two while parked in my second Manila, Philippines home, so I can’t say anything useful about their driving dynamics compared to counterparts from Mini, but I truly don’t believe they could be much better than a Cooper 3- or 5-Door Hatch or Clubman. I can attest to the Countryman S and the new Countryman S E ALL4 plug-in hybrid being more planted at high speeds than the latest BMW X1 xDrive28i, however, the latter seeming to have been designed as more of a comfort-oriented, practical alternative. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
These sport seats are really supportive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Cooper S Convertible, on the other hand, is hardly as big and accommodating inside or out, its rear passenger area and luggage compartment actually the tightest in the entire Mini line. The back seats are probably best used for smaller adults and/or children, whereas the trunk measures 160 litres when the divider is moved lower and top is down, or 215 litres with the top up and moveable divider raised. It’s only accessible through a smallish opening too, but on the positive loading is assisted thanks to a really useful wagon-style folding tailgate that provides a temporary shelf for placing cargo before shifting it inside, while you can expand on cargo capability via 50/50 split-folding rear seatbacks when hauling longer cargo such as skis or snowboards is required. All in all, the Cooper Convertible’s passenger/cargo capability is fairly flexible when put up against most rival ragtops, especially similarly priced roadsters like the Mazda MX-5 or Fiat 124 Spider. 

Of note, Mini’s cloth top is a very well insulated “3-in-1” design that’s truly quiet, not to mention capable of retracting or closing in just 18 seconds via an almost completely automated process (you just need to keep holding the overhead toggle switch). When opening, it first stops halfway to form a big sunroof, which is perfect for those times when totally dropping the top isn’t ideal. Pressing and holding it again causes the roof to completely retract, while repeating the same two-step process in reverse powers the top upwards. The convertible can be opened or closed while driving up to 30 km/h, so don’t worry about how much time you have while waiting at a stoplight. Additionally you can open or close the roof from your key fob while outside, handy if you left the interior exposed in your driveway when it unexpectedly starts to rain. 

2019 Mini Cooper S Convertible
Rear seating is fairly tight, but doable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Cooper S Convertible isn’t without competition, the soon to be discontinued Volkswagen Beetle Convertible and cute little Fiat 500 Cabrio (which is available in sporty Abarth trim) being the closest four-seat rivals, but most would agree that the car on this page offers more luxury and performance than either European challenger. 

In short, Mini’s drop-top is a comparatively roomy four-place convertible with decent stowage, premium-like interior refinements, excellent onboard electronics, agreeable fuel-efficiency, and a fun-to-drive personality that’s hard to beat, all for a competitive price when adding up all its positive attributes. Those who simply want to own a really well made car that’s an absolute blast to drive each and every day will likely love the Mini Cooper S Convertible. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

Incentives, Incentives, Incentives: Which Ones Do I Qualify For?

When it comes to any transaction, saving money is a big win. From saving a couple of bucks on a burger to saving thousands on a new car, any opportunity to save money should be seized. Purchasing a vehicle is quite significant and next to purchasing a home, is one of the largest transaction one will make in their lifetime. Because of this, many scramble to find ways to knock some dollars off of the cost of their vehicle.

One surefire way to save big on your next new vehicle purchase is to utilize a Dealer Invoice Report. The report generates the dealer invoice price of the car you want which is usually quite less than the market price. The report also offers various incentives Canadians can utilize to save even more money on their purchase. When it comes to incentives, there are various different types. It’s important to have strong knowledge of the various incentives to see whether or not you qualify for the savings they offer.

 

Financing Incentives

The most popular method of purchasing a car is financing. Financing allows you to pay for the total cost of the vehicle over a selected term. Unlike a lease, when the term is up, you get to keep the vehicle. Many people opt for this method of payment because it offers flexibility and ownership simultaneously. With financing, there is an interest fee which is added to the total cost of the vehicle and distributed throughout the weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly installments. The interest rate depends on one’s credit score.

Financing incentives drive the interest rate down, either for the entire term or for a select portion of it. Many automakers offer 0% financing for the first few months or year. For that length of time, there is no added interest fee to your payments. Other financing incentives offer low-interest rates, typically under 5% for up to 72 months. To qualify for these incentives, you must have good-excellent credit. If your credit is in good standing, it is worth looking into saving on that added interest fee!

 

Pay-In-Full Incentives

When it comes to new car purchases, paying in full is the least utilized method. Paying in full requires an entire lump sum being paid all at once, and if one is able to do so, they can avoid monthly payments and the debt amassed from financing/leasing. When it comes to financing, there is also minimal payment required since there is no need to prove whether or not you can make payments.

Many automakers offer significant savings in the form of incentives for those who choose to purchase a vehicle outright. The savings are typically quite high because the dealer is guaranteed to make a commission off of the sale since payment is made upfront. If you are able to purchase a vehicle in full, make sure you check out what incentives are available for you!

 

Bonus Cash Incentives

These incentives are not as heavily advertised as others, however, they can help select individuals save a good portion of money on their new vehicle purchase. These incentives are typically available for military personnel, students, recent college graduates, employees, or affiliates. They are put in place to help certain niches knock off some cash on their purchase. The Dealer Invoice Report includes bonus cash incentives within. If you qualify, let your dealer know so you can nab the deal.

 

Cash-Back Incentives

These are deemed to be one of the most popular and well-advertised incentives on the market. What do these rebates entail? Automakers offer cash back rebates to the consumer if they purchase their new vehicle by a certain date. Rebates typically fall anywhere between $500-$5000, however, this doesn’t mean you are handed over a huge cheque when you finalize your purchase. The cash back is typically rolled over to your payments and will knock money off throughout the term of your payment, equaling the total amount of the incentive. Similar to financing incentives, these are put in place to lower weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly costs.

When it comes to purchasing a new vehicle, there is a surplus of incentives on the market. Some are made obvious by the automaker and/or dealer and some require a little more research to come across. The Dealer Invoice Report comprises incentives relative to the dealer, automaker, or your own situation to make the process of saving money that much easier. Cashing in on these incentives is worthwhile if you are looking to save money on your new vehicle!

 

Looking for even more ways to save money on your next new vehicle purchase? Get your FREE Dealer Invoice Report and discover all the savings available for you!

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Road Test

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The 2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 looks great and can go just about anywhere. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The Colorado ZR2 is one wicked looking pickup truck. Chevrolet got the design just right, and together with its beefy styling and rugged suspension, GM’s most popular brand has brought one impressive off-road race replica to market. 

To be clear, Chevy wasn’t first to this market sector and certainly won’t be the final entry. While there are probably others I should mentioned, Dodge’s Power Wagon was one of the street-capable off-road race truck initiators, although today’s 4×4 fans will likely point to the 2010 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor as first on the scene, as far as OEM custom off-roaders go. 

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ (FCA) Ram brand has tried to answer back with its 2016 to present 1500 Rebel, which is much like previous Power Wagons with bolder frontal styling, while Toyota arrived a few years ago with its Tundra and Tacoma TRD Pro packages, the latter recently adding a snorkel-style air intake that makes it appear like it can swim across rivers, through mud holes, or any other deep, liquid barrier. 

Right about now I should also draw your attention to the fresh new 2020 Jeep Gladiator, which when suited up in Rubicon trim might be the most credible 4×4 in the mid-size pickup category (it’s definitely has good roots), while delivering payload and trailering capacities that compete well too. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
Classic pickup truck styling is joined by rugged off-road capability. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

While I’m covering all of these trail-rated cargo (and family) haulers I need to mention Chevrolet’s recently re-skinned Silverado that can be specified in new Trail Boss trim with a two-inch lift kit, improving off-road capability over its GMC Sierra Elevation cousin, but other than this the Trail Boss is mostly about cosmetics, whereas Nissan offers tough Pro-4X trims on its aging Frontier and more up-to-date Titan half-ton and heavy-half Titan XD models. Lastly, Honda offers its Ridgeline with a Black Edition and… well… it’s no CRF250X, let alone ZR2 rival. 

The Gladiator Rubicon and Tacoma TRD Pro are the only mid-size ZR2 competitors capable of whacking through the wilderness (GMC’s Canyon doesn’t provide anything quite as 4×4-worthy), and the Chevy can be made even more capable with its Bison upgrade package, yet all of the above deserve comment (including the 2018 to present Ford Ranger Raptor that’s now getting snapped up by wealthier off-road enthusiasts in Asia). 

Obviously size matters, with the North American Raptor, the Rebel (Power Wagon), the Tundra, and the Silverado/Sierra fraternal twins being full-size models, and the Tacoma, Ranger, Frontier, and this Colorado (plus the Canyon) more compact in their mid-size proportions. 

Another big differentiator is the powertrains on offer, and being that this review is about a mid-size model I’ll focus on its key rivals, with most incorporating four-cylinder and (when equipped to compete off the beaten path) V6 gasoline-powered engines. The two GM mid-size trucks do likewise, but they also buck tradition by adding a high-torque, fuel-efficient turbo-diesel mill. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The Duramax diesel powered ZR2 looks identical, other than some subtle badging. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

So, let’s focus in on the standard and optional ZR2 powertrains and how each measures up when compared to its Jeep and Toyota challengers, and then factor in some of their 4×4-related features. For starters, I spent a week with each engine, starting with a greyish Deepwood Green Metallic painted one that’s in fact a 2018 model (I’ll talk about the differences later in this review). This optional colour was cancelled for 2019, but the superb 2.8-litre Duramax turbo-diesel four-cylinder under its bulging hood remains. It makes 181 horsepower and a best-in-segment 369 lb-ft of torque from a mere 2,000 rpm, and comes paired to a strong six-speed automatic transmission. 

It’s fuel-efficient compared to rivals thanks to a 12.5 L/100km city, 10.7 highway and 11.7 combined Transport Canada rating, but whether or not its stingy enough to justify its lofty $4,090 price tag will depend on the number of years and kilometres you plan to employ its service, or if you really want to take advantage of its efficiency for travelling farther into the wild yonder than gasoline-powered 4×4 owners dare go, or if you appreciate the tractability of its massive torque when trekking into said wilderness more than the immediate power its V6 offers. 

Behind the blackened grille of the Kinetic Blue Metallic painted (a $495 option) 2019 ZR2 is the standard 3.6-litre V6 that produces 308 horsepower and 275 lb-ft of torque from 4,000 rpm. Just like the diesel, the V6 powers the rear axle or both diffs via part-time four-wheel drive, but unlike the diesel the standard engine’s gearbox is an even more economical eight-speed unit. The combo results in an estimated 15.0 L/100km in the city, 13.0 on the highway and 14.1 combined, partly due to cylinder deactivation when less performance is needed, and while decent it’s hardly the GM engine of choice for driving past pumps. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The Colorado ZR2 is one of few off-road kings available today. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The Gladiator, on the other hand, only comes with FCA’s 3.6-litre V6, which makes 285 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque. That’s off by 23 horsepower and 15 lb-ft when compared to the base ZR2 V6, although it offers up a standard six-speed manual (no such luck with the ZR2) or alternatively an eight-speed auto, plus part-time 4WD, and comes with a Transport Canada rating that ranges between 10.4 and 14.1 L/100km city/highway combined depending on trims and transmissions. 

As for the Tacoma TRD Pro, it’s standard with Toyota’s well-proven 3.5-litre V6 that puts out 276 horsepower and 265 lb-ft of torque, which is down some 32 horsepower and 10 lb-ft of torque on the V6-powered ZR2, and mates up to a six-speed manual or a six-speed auto plus part-time 4WD, while achieving city/highway combined fuel economy ranging from 11.9 to 12.9 L/100km, depending on transmissions and cabs. 

All of the above V6s will outrun the Duramax turbo-diesel by significant margins, something I immediately noticed when setting out in the 2019 Colorado, but the advantage of the diesel’s 109, 104 and 94 lb-ft of torque advantage when compared to the Gladiator, Tacoma and ZR2 V6 respectively, gives the diesel big advantages on the trail, plus of course its 11.7 city/highway combined fuel economy that can only be beaten by one single Gladiator trim (and I’d be shocked to witness the FCA V6 winning out in real-world back-to-back tests). 

Engine torque is important when off-road, but there are other factors that are even more important when leaving pavement, such as ground clearance, front and rear overhangs, and wheelbase length to name a few. The Tacoma provides the shortest wheelbase at 3,236 mm (127.4 in), but its 5,392-mm (212.3-in) nose-to-tail length means its overhangs are more pronounced, resulting in a truck that won’t hang up as easily when scaling sharp crests or other obstacles, but will probably scrape its front and rear bumpers when approaching a steep incline or levelling off after a radical decline. By comparison, the Colorado’s wheelbase is nearly as short at 3,258 mm (128.3 in), but improves on approach and departure angles with the shortest overall length of 5,347 mm (210.5 in), whereas the Gladiator has the longest wheelbase by far at 3,487 mm (137.3 in), plus it measures a limousine-like 5,537 mm (218.0 in) from front to back (ok, not quite as long as a limo, but you get my drift). 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
Plenty of modifications separate the ZR2 from regular Colorados. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

To clarify, I’ve only tested the 2018 and 2019 ZR2 models plus a 2017 Tacoma TRD Pro (it now includes the aforementioned snorkel and a number of other improvements), so I can’t offer a full critique of the latest TRD Pro or the Gladiator. As noted earlier, I had a version of the 2018 ZR2 with the Duramax Turbo-Diesel for a week, plus spent a week with a 2019 V6-powered variant, and mostly drove them around town and within suburban, rural areas on tarmac, but also took both out on the trail, the latter deep diving in hood-high standing water. I tested the previous Tacoma off-road too, and I had no trouble negotiating the chosen trail, but being a different location and a long time ago (two years is eons in vehicle development time), a direct comparo wouldn’t be fair. 

On that note I hope to test a Gladiator Rubicon this summer, and you can bet I’ll be getting it as dirty as possible when I do. It features a disconnecting front sway bar to help with articulation (something I first experienced in a Ram Power Wagon, and is now also part of the Ram 1500 Rebel upgrade), plus it uses the Wrangler’s solid front axle that’s considered an improvement over the independent front suspensions used by the ZR2 and most other modern pickup trucks. Of course, I’ll make sure to use experiences from my ZR2 tests as part of my future Gladiator review. 

Like the first 2017 Colorado ZR2 and the greenish-grey 2018 turbo-diesel model partially reviewed here, the newest 2019 ZR2 receives the same substantial increase in ride height, and therefore gets the same 50-mm (2.0-inch) increase in ground clearance, while any high-speed handling negatives are offset by 90 mm (3.5 inches) of increased front and rear track, plus stiffer new cast-iron lower front control arms, and a unique set of 8- by 17-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 31-inch Goodyear Duratrac off-road rubber. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The ZR2’s Multimatic shocks are key components to its off-road and on-pavement prowess. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

What’s more, a 1.0-inch-diameter solid anti-roll bar replaces the usual 1.5-inch hollow one, improving suspension articulation, while last but hardly least are special Multimatic DSSV Position Sensitive Spool Valve Damping Performance shocks that help cushion the otherwise jarring impacts of rocks, roots and other obstacles you might find along an ungraded back road or trail (the TRD Pro utilizes Fox-sourced shocks, by the way, which are rated highly as well). 

The skid plates below and tubular rocker extensions at each side are easier to see, both having been designed to protect vulnerable components beneath as well as low hanging bodywork, but the ZR2’s matte black grille and even more aggressive black domed hood make it even more noticeable to onlookers, not to mention its rugged black bumpers that get abbreviated at each corner to improve approach and departure angles, and extended black fender flares that make room for its all-terrain rubber. 

The local 4×4 park chosen is one I test trucks and SUVs on regularly, so I’m familiar with its plentiful obstacles. While difficult for many presumed off-roaders, most of its challenges are a cakewalk for the ZR2, but were still intimidating without a spotting crew to guide me through. During the diesel’s mostly dry afternoon I was able to drag the rear-mounted spare tire over some deep rutted knolls plus up and down some steep terrain, once again finding ground at the rear (but not the front), while I was able to lift the left rear into midair and leave it there spinning (a silly thing some 4×4 fans do for kicks), and while there was a lot more skill remaining in this truck than my dirt playground could not fully extract, I was able to prove that the ZR2 is capable enough for serious off-road duty, yet still plenty comfortable. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The Colorado’s cab is well organized in any trim, but the ZR2 offers a suitably upscale experience. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The second off-road adventure with the 2019 ZR2 came mid-winter, on a particularly cold and rainy day. Rain means mud at best and massive pools of standing water at worst (or maybe best, depending on how you look at it). The steep grades that were child’s play before required locking both front and rear differentials now (just like with the Gladiator, albeit not so with the Taco TRD Pro that only includes lockers at the rear), but doing so allowed easy control all the way up and all the way down. Even better, partway into a 50-foot puddle my heart started to race when the truck’s front end slipped deeper into a set of ruts, forcing dirty water across the top of the hood and even onto the windshield, but a steady foot on the throttle allowed the meaty tires to keep momentum up, and the ZR2 pulled me to the other side without fanfare (other than my pounding heart). At that point I was wishing I’d had the TRD Pro’s snorkel, but obviously the ZR2 didn’t need it, this time around at least. 

The thought of swamping an engine (which would void the warranty) makes the $6,980 need for the ZR2’s Bison package seem cheap. Of course, the Bison package wouldn’t have necessarily helped in this situation (it really should include a snorkel, if not just for style points), and I can’t say I’d want the ZR2 in Red Hot paint (I’d rather have the option of colours), but it gets design points for its bold “CHEVROLET” emblazoned grille (similar to the Raptor’s “FORD” grille replacement), unique AEV (American Expedition Vehicles) front and rear bumpers (the one up front capable of accepting a winch), the beefier black extended fender flares, special 17-inch AEV alloy wheels, fog lights, contoured front and rear floor liners, and about 90 kilograms (200 lbs) of super-strong boron steel AEV skid plates (front, transfer case, fuel tank, and rear differential) to better protect its vital components. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
This simple, straightforward gauge cluster includes a 4.2-inch colour multi-info display at centre. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Of course, the ZR2 is still extremely capable without Bison upgrades, and quite a standout in the styling department too. The regular Colorado a bit tame to my eyes, at least when compared to most competitors, specifically the latest Tacoma and new Gladiator, but the ZR2’s bulging domed matte black louvered hood, redesigned matte black front bumpers and rear bumpers, exposed skid plates, robust tubular rocker protectors, and other trim upgrades give it a tougher look. Look beyond the machine-finished 17-inch alloy wheels with black-painted pockets and you’ll be able to see the bright yellow Multimatic dampers, unless they’re covered in dirt. 

The ZR2’s lack of side steps might look good and not hang up on protruding trail debris, but it hampers access for shorter folk like me. There aren’t any Corner Steps on the back bumper to provide a leg up to the bed either, these issues being the only complaints I have against this special model. 

Once inside I enjoyed the view provided by the aforementioned ride height and the Colorado’s inherently great sightlines in all directions. This helps in traffic, of course, possibly even giving you the edge needed to find your way up to the front of the pack. There’s where you’ll enjoy V6 performance, the larger of the two being a good choice for those wanting power over fuel efficiency. The V6 delivers a decided jump off the line and then keeps up the pace right up to legal highway speeds and beyond, while the diesel only jumps off the line initially, and simply can’t maintain the same level of forward thrust as its revs rise. This will be just find for diesel enthusiasts like me, because the engine helps it feel more like a work truck capably going about its business, and of course it pays big dividends when it comes time to fill up. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The standard high-definition backup camera is ultra-clear. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Colorado ZR2 buyers won’t have to make a choice about handling, fortunately, because both engines manage corners equally well. Even with its increased suspension, or possibly because of it, the ride is fairly smooth and quite comfortable, unless jumping curbs. Those slightly firmer Multimatic dampers, which work so very well off-road, also help to reduce body roll at higher speeds on pavement, resulting in a truck that’s surprisingly athletic through high-speed serpentine curves, unless you’re attempting to go quicker than anything so top-heavy and obviously 4×4-focused is supposed to go. Braking is pretty good too, but once again we shouldn’t get in over our heads. The ZR2 weighs in at 1,987 kg (4,381 lbs), and more when upgraded with the aforementioned Bison package, so judge stopping distances accordingly. 

As per usual I only pushed the ZR2 hard during testing, and no matter the surfaces driven over or the speeds attained, the driver’s seat was comfortable and supportive. I especially appreciated the lateral support provided by its big side bolsters, which stopped me sliding sideways on what could have otherwise been slippery leather. 

The upholstery was dyed black as usual, albeit highlighted with a red embroidered “2” as part of the otherwise black “ZR2” insignia on the headrests. The ZR2’s steering wheel receives no such name recognition, but it has a meaty rim that’s wrapped in soft and comfortable leather, with grippy baseball-style stitching in the middle. Other than its four-spoke design it appears more like the type of sport steering wheel you’d find in a performance car, and thanks to the generous reach of its standard tilt and telescoping steering column I fit in perfectly. I was able to sit upright with the steering wheel perfectly positioned for my long-legged, short torso, five-foot-eight, slight-build body, safely and comfortably with my hands at the optimal nine and three o’clock positions, further allowing an easy reach to the pedals below and once again, great visibility all-round. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
This wireless charging pad comes standard. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The rear seating area of this Crew Cab, short box configured ZR2 (the ZR2 can also be had with an Extended Cab and a long box) is roomy for adults (and kids) of all shapes and sizes. When the driver’s seat was positioned for my height, there was still about five inches in front of my knees and more than enough room for my feet, plus I had another three to four inches over my head, and five inches from my shoulders and hips to the door, plus I’d guess you could seat a smaller person comfortably between the two outboard positions. With only two in back, more comfort can be accessed via a wide centre armrest filled with large cupholders that include rubber grips to hold cups or bottles in place. Other handy features include twin rear USB ports and a 12-volt charger. 

If you want to keep your gear dry and safe from theft, the rear seat headrests fold forward and the backrests tumble flat so you can lay your belongings on top, or instead you can lift the lower seat cushion up to expose a storage compartment underneath, this complete with every tool you’ll need to lower the spare tire from below the bed and then change the wheel. 

Seats and armrests aside, the ZR2 doesn’t offer any soft, pliable composite surface treatments in the rear, but back up front the dash top receives a nice soft paint to absorb sound and make it more appealing to touch, as does much of the instrument panel. It should also be noted this isn’t the priciest trim in Chevy’s Colorado fleet, due to being optimized primarily for off-road purposes, but it was certainly nice enough for this class of truck. On the positive are some attractive metal-like accents around the centre stack and lower console, plus the door handles and armrests. The door handles inside are chromed too, as are the centres of some knobs on the centre stack. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The Colorado provides a large, spacious interior, and the ZR2’s leather-covered seats are very comfortable. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The primary gauge cluster is legible in all lighting conditioned thanks to bright background lighting and good shielding from sunlight. It’s filled with the usual tachometer to the left and speedometer on the right, with a fuel gauge and engine temperature meter topping off a fairly large 4.2-inch high-resolution colour multi-information display just below at centre. 

The latter is controlled with a pad of four arrows on the right-side steering wheel spoke, which when pushed provides a bright menu of multicoloured functions including info, audio, phone, navigation, options, and more, while the navigation system provides directions within the gauge cluster’s multi-info display where they can be seen more easily without removing eyes too far from the road ahead, with more detailed mapping shown on the large 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen over on the centre stack (this 8.0-inch display is now standard with all Colorado trims except the base Work Truck or WT that still does ok with its new 7.0-inch touchscreen). 

That larger touchscreen includes Chevy’s well laid-out, bright, and colourful HD menu display that seems as if it was inspired by Apple’s iPhone/iPad, which I think is a good thing, but if you want something even more inline with Cupertino you can plug your phone into a specified USB to access the standard Apple CarPlay app, or alternatively Android Auto (although I don’t like it anywhere near was much). I’m glad that Chevy gives us these smartphone connectivity alternatives, while also featuring an audio system that can be easily connected to a phone with Bluetooth wireless streaming, or alternatively you can listen to satellite radio, plus all the classic AM/FM/HD radio stations. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The rear seating area is large and accommodating too. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The navigation system worked well, with accurate routing and nicely detailed mapping that was easy enough to sort out. I only wished that it warned me of a turn sooner, but instead it gave instant notice and even then the directions were in black and white and fairly small, making them hard to make out. Larger, brighter and in colour would’ve been ideal, and saying something like “Turn right in 50 meters”. I liked that the infotainment system received text messages and provided a number of stock responses for communicating safely while driving, while other useful apps include OnStar, traffic info, and shopping (not sure about that last one while driving though). 

Along with navigation, the ZR2 includes a fabulous high-definition backup camera with active guidelines (but in need to inform you the Gladiator’s reportedly has front and rear trail cams that can even be cleaned via the infotainment system), with some other standard ZR2 features including a phone charging pad placed just in front of the centre armrest (standard with Z71 trim and above), plus a USB port inside the armrest if your phone needs wired power. Chevrolet also provides two more USB ports (one supporting new USB C-type devices) and an aux port, plus an available SD card reader, within another storage bin at the base of the centre stack, allowing you and your devices to be well cared for. Finally, the latest Colorado includes a second microphone mounted closer to the front passenger to improve the voice quality of Bluetooth hands-free connected phones, while a personal favourite had nothing to do with connectivity, but rather the ZR2’s heated steering wheel that warmed my hands on some cold winter mornings, this now standard with all trims above the LT. 

Speaking of warmth, standard ZR2 features include GM’s superb heated front seats that not only warm up the lower cushion and backrest together, but can be adjusted to only heat the latter, which is great for people like me who occasionally suffer from lower back pain and just want some temporary relief. This in mind, the ZR2 only includes single-zone automatic climate control, not the expected dual-zone design provided to top-line versions of the Tacoma and Gladiator. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The rear seats flip down for storing cargo. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

I think most of us could live without such a luxury, but I really appreciate having proximity-sensing entry and a pushbutton ignition system. The ZR2 doesn’t get a sunroof either, which might bother those wowed by Jeep’s removable roof. I appreciated the padded sunglasses holder on the overhead console, and the reading lights were decent enough, but they’re only incandescent lamps, not LEDs. The centre mirror is auto-dimming, however, plus along with OnStar it includes a button for voice activation as well as an “SOS” one to reach out for help when required. 

A row of useful switches can be found on the centre stack too, including one for turning off the stability control, plus a bed light, hill descent control, an exhaust brake that’s useful when towing, a hazard light, and finally two individual toggles for the front and rear differential locks noted before. 

Trailering in mind, the ZR2’s towing capacity is rated at 2,268 kilos (5,000 lbs) no matter which engine is being used, while its payload is a sizeable 500 kilograms (1,100 lbs) with the four-door short-bed or 528 kg (1,164 lbs) with the extended-cab long-bed. The Tacoma TRD Pro, on the other hand, is capable of a 2,900-kg (6,400-lb) tow rating and a payload of 454 kg (1,000 lbs), whereas the Gladiator Rubicon (the closest to the ZR2) can trailer up to 2,040 kg (4,500 lbs) and haul a payload of up to 544 kg (1,200 lbs) with the manual, or drag 3,175 kg (7,000 lbs) of trailer weight or carry 526 kg (1,160 lbs) on its backside when equipped with its automatic. 

2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2
The ZX2 can do most anything a regular pickup truck can, plus conquer almost any trail. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

You may have noticed that I haven’t covered all of the ZR2’s comfort and convenience features in this review, but take note they’re easily available on the Chevrolet retail website or right here at CarCostCanada, where I sourced all 2019 Colorado pricing info including trims, packages and standalone options, not to mention money-saving rebate info and dealer invoice pricing. Suffice to say it’s well equipped for its $46,100 Extra Cab base price, or $47,600 when opting for the Crew Cab, plus freight and fees of course. 

No matter the Colorado ZR2 powertrain you choose, you’ll be getting a well-designed mid-size pickup truck that can overcome nearly any obstacle on or off the road. I’d opt for the diesel with the Bison upgrade and find an aftermarket snorkel, but hey, it’s easy to say that without following through on a payment plan. It’s great that Chevy provides so many options, allowing plenty of opportunity to personalize. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay