2019 Buick Regal GS Road Test

2019 Buick Regal GS
Good looking Buick Regal GS doesn’t have to be shy about styling. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

There have been a lot of cancelled domestic sedans as of late, but rest assured this Buick Regal isn’t going anywhere soon. 

FCA initiated the process by chopping its Dodge Dart and Chrysler 200 a couple of years ago, which was quickly followed by near simultaneous announcements from both Ford Motor and General Motors that their car lineups would soon be cut back, with the blue-oval and its Lincoln luxury division eliminating every car but Mustang, and GM more modestly cancelling its Chevrolet Cruze, Volt, Impala, Buick LaCrosse, Cadillac CT6 and XTS. With the Chevy Malibu Hybrid slated for cancellation after this 2019 model year, there’s some talk about whether the conventionally powered version will last much longer, but so far this is just gossip. 

The Malibu is a very good mid-size sedan that I’d be sorry to see leave, truly competing well against its mainstream volume peers, and that car’s relevance is probably why we still have the Regal. The two share core underpinnings, and while there’s no performance-tuned Malibu SS to match the Regal GS’ vigor off the line or through the curves, it’s a car I could happily live with. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
It looks like a sedan, but the Regal is actually a hatchback, dubbed Sportback by Buick. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

GS trim is top of the line for Regal, so along with plenty of luxury features, its 310-horsepower V6 and other go-fast goodies easily make it one of the sportiest mid-size family sedans available. It’s also not technically a sedan, but rather a five-door hatchback or liftback, Buick choosing to name it Sportback. It’s hard to tell it’s a hatch instead of the usual trunk, but given a little time with one you’ll quickly appreciate how versatile its load-hauling capabilities are. 

Speaking of practicality, Buick makes a raised five-door sport wagon/crossover variant (similar in purpose to the Subaru Outback and Volvo V90 Cross Country) for the U.S. market (plus Europe, under the Opel and Vauxhall brands, as well as Australia and New Zealand where the two body styles are sold as the Holden Commodore). In the U.S. it’s called the Regal TourX, and I have to say it’s a smart looking car that I wish we had here, but no doubt it’s not available due to low potential sales. GM’s Chinese division has no problems selling cars, Regals in particular, but nevertheless they chose not to offer the TourX either, choosing to only go with this four-door coupe-like sedan instead. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
This top-line GS model has lots of sporty styling cues, plus real performance upgrades like powerful Brembo brakes. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Its styling should be attractive to most, as should its impressive performance, but nevertheless this Regal remains one of the least popular cars in its mainstream volume segment. Alternatively we could classify it amongst premium brands and then it might be considered more of a success. After all, with a base price of $32,045 plus freight and fees it starts $3,000 to $7,000 pricier than most rivals, pushing it closer to entry-level luxury alternatives. It should also be noted that similarly priced volume-branded mid-size sedans do about the same or worse when it comes to sales. This said, the Regal doesn’t measure up to premium status or refinement levels (the General’s Cadillac division fulfills that need), so the unique model’s low sales are understandable (see all 2019 Buick Regal pricing right here on CarCostCanada, where you can also find out about available rebates and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands). 

The as-tested Regal GS being reviewed here starts at a very premium-level $44,045, and jumps up to $51,700 with all available features (plus a couple of useful accessories), which while very reasonable when compared to similarly sized and equipped premium-branded cars, it’s a big jump upmarket from a loaded up Toyota Camry, Honda Accord or Ford Fusion, these being the top-three sellers in the mid-size sedan segment. Its fully loaded price is only $205 more than a totally optioned out Kia Stinger, mind you, and in fact $1,880 less than VW’s loaded up Arteon. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
The spacious interior is mostly good, although Buick cut some corners when it comes to fit and finish. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

To Kia’s credit the top-line Stinger is a 365-horsepower twin-turbo V6-powered AWD “hot-hatch” capable of sprinting from zero to 100 km/h in a mere 4.9 seconds, but the GS provides respectable acceleration of 5.6 seconds from standstill to 100km/h, which is actually better than the now-legendary Regal Grand National GNX, and about the same as the lighter weight 265-horsepower Arteon (the VeeDub weighs about 300 kilos or 660 lbs less than this Buick). These sprint times are of course estimates, with some manufacturers more conservative in their claims than others, but the GS’ 3.6-litre V6 engine’s torque rating of 282 lb-ft is likely spot on. 

There are plenty of other reasons to place each of these impressive cars high on your shopping list, and many attributes that set them apart from their more conventional family sedan challengers. I won’t be tempted to make this review a full-blown comparison test, despite recently driving all of the above for a week apiece, but instead will solely concentrate on the Regal GS, while occasionally pointing out strengths and weaknesses against key competitors. 

I find each of these three cars attractive from a design perspective, so styling will come down to personal preferences. The Regal looks fabulous in my books, its classic lines and overall elegance working well for me, albeit my 50-something age might have something to do with this. I particularly like this GS model’s design details. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
Most upper surfaces are premium-like, while the sporty GS steering wheel really adds to its performance feel. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The visual enhancements start with bold red italicized “GS” lettering on the gloss-black mesh grille insert that’s framed by a glossy black surround, which is all underscored by even more piano black trim on lower fascia. The same shiny, inky treatment highlights the lower side window trim and rear valance, this sporty appearance package complemented by aluminum-look accents on the grille, corner grillettes, upper window surrounds, and exhaust finishers. A subtle body-colour rear deck lid spoiler, and a reworked rear bumper design finish off the sporty upgrade. 

Open the door and you’d be forgiven for thinking that Buick is channeling the ghost of Pontiac, as you’ll be looking at two of the most aggressive sport seats in the mid-size sedan class, not to mention a contrast-stitched, leather-clad sport steering wheel to match, complete with a flattened bottom for extra spunk. I won’t go so far say the GS’ wheel is as perfectly shaped as the Arteon’s impeccably crafted spokes and rim, or for that matter the Stinger’s shift paddle-enhanced design, but they’re all considerably better than average in this family-focused class. Like the others, Buick provides yet more piano black lacquer trim inside, plus some carbon weave-like inlays here and there, as well as aluminum-look and chrome accents elsewhere, giving the Regal true sport sedan interior design. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
The centre panel of the Regal GS gauge package is all digital. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

A partially digital primary gauge cluster features a red GS insignia on the 4.2-inch speedometer/multi-information display at centre, reminding all this is Buick’s fastest model. The graphic can be swapped for a number of useful functions via steering wheel controls. 

On top of the centre stack is Buick’s latest IntelliLink infotainment system, housed in a very impressive high-resolution 8.0-inch touchscreen. Its multiple aqua-green circles on a high-contrast black background look good, and a bit more premium-like than the bright, colourful Apple-style interface in the aforementioned Malibu, which is probably fitting for Buick’s older and slightly wealthier average buyer. The system is easy to use and once again filled up with useful functions, from a big, clear reverse camera including dynamic guidelines, to a user-friendly navigation system with accurate route guidance with detailed mapping, plus all the expected audio features such as satellite/HD radio and Bluetooth streaming, phone and text message info/readouts, another panel for OnStar, a large interface for the two-zone auto HVAC system, etcetera. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
The centre touchscreen is large and very easy to use. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

A separate analogue HVAC panel provides quicker-access just below, plus switches for the three-way heated and ventilated front seats, while other items not yet mentioned that came with my Regal GS tester included a heated steering wheel, a head-up display, adaptive cruise control, auto-dimming rearview and driver’s side mirrors, two-way driver’s memory, leather upholstery, an eight-speaker Bose audio system, wireless device charging, a 4G LTE Wi-Fi hotspot, a power moonroof, passive keyless entry, pushbutton start/stop, remote start, auto-leveling LED headlamps with cornering capability, 19-inch alloys with grey-painted pockets, front and rear parking sonar, and the list goes on. 

Buick also added a bevy of advanced driver assistance and safety features including autonomous forward braking with collision alert and pedestrian detection, blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert, lane departure warning with lane keeping assist, and the brand’s first-ever active hood pedestrian safety system that raises the rear section of the hood by 100 mm (3.9 inches) in order to lessen impact and help reduce injury. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
These are two of the best front sport seats in the class. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

That sporty Regal GS driver’s seat is also wonderfully comfortable, much thanks to four-way lumbar support, an upscale feature that doesn’t even come with some premium-branded luxury sedans. The lower cushions are extendable too, and therefore ideally cup under the knees for added comfort and support, while the sizeable side bolsters provide good lateral support and powered adjustability, making them perfect for just about any body type. Due to plenty of reach from the tilt and telescopic steering column, the Regal also provided an excellent driving position, which isn’t always the case for my long-legged, short-torso frame. 

The GS’ V6 idles smoothly when it’s not turning off automatically to save fuel and reduce emissions, a very good thing, while this model’s upgraded nine-speed automatic provided quick, smooth shifts. The entire drivetrain was smooth and effortless to operate around town, on the highway, or when pushed through tighter, windy sections, but I was disappointed to learn that this sporty sedan didn’t include paddle shifters, which would have made this well sorted transmission and fully capable powerplant all the more entertaining. Instead, I pressed the Sport mode button, slotted the gear lever over to the left for manual mode, and shifted away to my heart’s content. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
The rear seats are roomy and comfortable, but there aren’t many features back here. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

It’s not a Wildcat 445, but the Regal GS isn’t short of enthusiasm off the line, while the gearbox is an ideal match, shifting quick but never harshly, although I found the need of more sport from the model’s Sport mode, so I quickly changed to the GS setting, which adds a bit more weight to the steering and helps the car to feel more engaging overall. I honestly missed having steering wheel paddles, but I nevertheless adapted as required and got the most out of this well balanced four-door when some of my favourite two-lane serpentine stretches goaded me on. The GS suspension is as smooth and comfortable as anyone should want, yet it manages curves well due to active dampers that make adjustments every two milliseconds. The car’s active twin-clutch all-wheel drive system aids fast cornering further, particularly in inclement weather, while its high-performance Brembo brakes perform as boldly as they look. The GS’ fuel economy is ok considering its performance and all-wheel drivetrain, with a claimed Transport Canada rating of 12.4 L/100km in the city, 8.7 on the highway and 10.7 combined. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
Just in case you forgot the Regal was a hatchback, check out how easy it is to access the cargo compartment. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Of course, the GS isn’t perfect. Its turn signal stalks are some of the cheapest feeling I’ve ever experienced, due to substandard hollow plastics and loose, sloppy fitment, while Buick spent less on premium composite surfaces. There’s simply too much low rent hard plastic on the lower dash, glove box lid, and mid to lower door panels, especially for a car that passes $50k in top trim. The previously noted VW Arteon isn’t all that much better when it comes to the latter, mind you, but the Stinger does a better job posing as a luxury model. Most GS upper surface treatments are finished in appropriately soft-touch synthetics, however, while front and rear seat roominess is more than adequate, with the rear outboard seats almost as comfortable as those up front, but the moulded black plastic panel covering the rear portion of the front console was bulbous and therefore ugly looking, like it was pulled from a much lower rent vehicle, while this issue was made worse due to the car’s rather spartan rear seat features, back passengers only provided two air vents and twinned USB ports. 

2019 Buick Regal GS
The Regal’s 40/20/40-split rear seatbacks make it wonderfully practical. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

True, this top-tier Regal GS is a bit lacklustre when it comes to features in back. For instance, it’s devoid of heatable rear seats that are included by most others in the $40k-plus category, and these would’ve been great additions for warming up after winter ski trips, the GS being an otherwise ideal snow shuttle thanks to grippy AWD and all-round good performance on twisty mountainside roads, its roomy liftback design, and its versatile 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks that would allow rear passengers to enjoy the more comfortable window seats with skis tucked down the middle. The Regal’s cargo cover is nice and weighty, feeling very well made, while rear seat releases conveniently expand the 892-litre (31.5 cubic-foot) cargo compartment into a sizeable 1,719 litres (60.7 cu ft). 

Although the Regal GS could use a few more features and doesn’t quite measure up to its peers when it comes to fit and finish inside, it’s an especially good looking and highly unique offering that’s worthy of your full attention. I’m guessing you’ll enjoy its performance, and appreciate its roomy, comfortable cabin, plus its general practicality, so if you can look past its few shortcomings, it just might provide an ideal compromise between your desire of style and performance and your more pragmatic requirements. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Trevor Hofmann

Embrace the Electric Invasion: Top 3 Electric Cars That Are Stylish and, Yes, Affordable!

Thinking about going electric but still have…qualms? 

Like many interested eco-shoppers, the biggest hurdle to buying an electric vehicle for you might be the cost! There’s hope yet! With the trend of battery technology prices falling rapidly, experts predict that the average price of an EV might soon be at par with conventional fuel vehicles come 2024. 

We’ll do you one better. To make your shopping experience easier, we’ve gone ahead and shortlisted the top 3 most affordable electric cars in Canada. If, for instance, you’re looking for the cost of an electric BMW car in Canada, read on to know how a dealer invoice report can fetch you your dream price without the hidden fees!

 

2019 Nissan Leaf

With over 400,000 models sold worldwide, the Nissan Leaf is the best-selling electric car of all time. Owners can expect a spacious cabin, impressive cargo capacity, composed handling and lively acceleration. 

The standard trim level offers over 240 kilometres while the Leaf Plus offers over 360 kilometres on a single charge. The car doesn’t skimp out on its added features. A 5-inch infotainment system with satellite radio and Bluetooth are available with the standard version. The Leaf Plus fetches you add ons like suede upholstery, an 8-inch display and forward collision alerts. 

 

2019 Hyundai Ioniq Electric

This is hailed as Canada’s favourite electric car, with its powertrain designed to offer a truly memorable ride. On just a single charge, the formidable Ioniq can reach 200 kilometres and produce zero emissions! Speaking of charging, the car takes about 4 ½ hours to reach full charge with a 240-volt charger. 

Owners can enjoy a 7-inch touch screen display, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, HD Radio, heated front seats and much more. 

Although some users have found the backseat space to be a bit cramped, especially for passengers that require the extra legroom, the Ioniq doesn’t fall short on impressive cargo capacity and peppy acceleration. 

 

2019 Tesla Model 3

Now you may not have guessed that Tesla would make it to this list, but as it turns out, the company is attempting to competitively price their vehicles to save face in the midst of their stellar rivals. 

The Model 3 boasts of an elegant and futuristic cabin that seats five passengers and doesn’t skimp out on the cargo volume. Users will find it lavished with state-of-the-art technology, a 15-inch touchscreen display, over-the-air software updates, Wi-Fi hotspots, side collision warning and more. 

Given its phenomenal acceleration, athletic handling, and impressive efficiency, this model definitely makes it a great buy for budget-savvy shoppers. 

 

Don’t Pay Full MSRP. 

Find Out the Dealer Cost on Your Electric Vehicle!

Sure, these cars are super affordable. But how cool would it be if you could elevate your savings even more? With Car Cost Canada, that isn’t just a pipe dream. Get a dealer invoice report for any make and model. Your report will reveal;

  • MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price – what the dealer paid to own the car)
  • Factory incentives
  • Lease and finance rates
  • Recommended dealerships
  • Vehicle pricing options
  • Comparable vehicles

Car negotiations don’t have to be a hassle when you know how much the dealer paid to own the vehicle. 

Save big! Get your Free report right here. 

How to Get Out of a Car Lease Early (Without Paying Penalties)!

There’s nothing quite as exciting as driving your new car off the lot. But sometimes, you may have a change of heart and want to trade that sports car in for something more affordable. If you’re on a lease, can you still break it after signing the agreement, disclosure statement and insurance forms without facing any penalties?

Yes, you can! In this article, we explain how to break a car lease in Ontario. We also reveal how a car dealer invoice report from Car Cost Canada can help you get your next car at an affordable price, with a lot more financing choices than just leasing!

Transferring the Lease

This is the simplest and most well-known way of breaking a lease ahead of time. You can opt to transfer it to a third party firm. A majority of leasing firms do allow for the lease to be transferred to another individual, however, there might be certain caveats. For example, you may be legally tied to the contract, meaning if the other individual defaults in paying on time, the onus falls on you to shoulder that liability. 

Moreover, transfer fees might apply, some of which go as high as $500. Bear in mind that the downpayment on the lease and the vehicle’s mileage might also require you to sweeten the pot by reducing payment amounts for the new lessee, which can go as high as $5,000. 

Trading or Selling the Car

You can also purchase the car from the lease company whenever you like, resulting in an premature buyout. This is an excellent tactic to get out of your lease, especially if you already have a buyer for the vehicle.

Make sure to undertake all dealings with the leasing firm and not the dealer. First things first, find out how much the buyout figure is. The leasing company owns the car, so if you go through a delaer you’re unnecessarily adding a middle person into the mix. 

The payoff figure may include an early end-of-lease fee which could range anywhere from $200 to $6,000. 

Asking the Lease Company to Offset Payments

If you’re in a contemporary financial pickle and need a couple of months to regain your footing, it’s better to communicate that with the lease company rather than directly opting to terminate the lease. 

There are quite a few companies that are willing to waive payments for a period of time. In certain cases, they may choose to reduce your monthly payments or suspend them for a while. Naturally, you will have to make good on the balance at a future date, but it’s still a great way to avoid penalties. 

Looking to Buy a Cheaper Ride? Need More Financing Options

Get a free dealer invoice report! A dealer report generates the price the dealer paid for the vehicle as opposed to the MSRP which is marked up, sometimes substantially. The report reveals the dealer price as well as the incentives you may be eligible for. 

What will the report contain?

  • The MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price)
  • Factory incentives
  • Leasing and financing options
  • Recommended dealerships
  • Vehicle pricing options
  • Comparable vehicles
  • Great car insurance deals

Most dealers readily accept the report. When you present the information on paper you may avoid a pesky negotiation process.

Request your free report right here!

2019 Lexus ES 300h Road Test

2019 Lexus ES 300h
Lexus totally redesigned its popular ES luxury sedan for 2019, and it looks fabulous. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Model year 2019 marks three decades of Lexus ES availability, and while the car’s primary purpose hasn’t changed one iota, today’s seventh generation wouldn’t be recognizable by those who created the original.  

The comparatively humble ES 250 was brought to market in 1989, and made no bones about its even more proletariat Toyota Camry roots. It was actually rushed to market so Lexus wouldn’t be a one-model brand, the full-size LS 400 making up the other half of the lineup. The ES, which was actually based on the Japanese market Camry Prominent/ Vista, was a good looking, well built, and fairly potent V6-powered mid-size luxury sedan, and thanks to that did reasonably well considering the all-new brand behind it. 

Lexus has produced six ES generations since that first example, releasing this latest version last year for 2019, and while each new update improved upon its predecessor, this new model is by far the most dramatic to look at, most refined inside, and best to drive. 

Lexus has done such a great job of pulling the ES upmarket, that it’s going to be a lot harder to justify having two mid-size sedans in its lineup. The two cars look pretty similar and are quite close in size, with the new ES’ wheelbase a mere 20 millimetres (0.8 inches) longer at 2,870 mm (113.0 in), and 4,960 mm (195.3 in) of nose-to-tail length more of a stretch due to another 110 mm (4.3 in). The ES is also 25 mm (1.0 in) wider than the GS, spanning 1,865 mm (73.4 in) from mirror to mirror, but at 1,445 mm (56.9 in) tall it’s 10 mm (0.4 in) lower in height, the ES’ long, wide and low design giving it stylish proportions that are arguably more attractive than the sportier, pricier GS. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
Lexus has made major strides when it comes to styling, and the new ES 300h is no exception. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be fair, the GS not only provides stronger performance, especially through curves but also off the line, and particularly in fully tuned GS F trim that’s good for 467 horsepower, but it feels more substantive overall due to 66 kg (145 lbs) of extra curb weight in base trim and 185 kg (408 lbs) of added heft as a hybrid, plus a rear wheel-drive architecture shared with the smaller IS series sedan and coupe, a more rigid, sport-tuned suspension design, and other enhancements justifying its significantly pricier window sticker. 

On that note the 2019 Lexus GS ranges between $63,800 and just over $100,000, compared to only $45,000 to $61,500 for the ES (check out pricing for all new and past models right here at CarCostCanada, including trims, packages and separate options, plus find out about rebate information as well as dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands). 

Behind the big new ES grille is a 302 horsepower version of Lexus/Toyota’s well-proven 3.5-litre V6, those numbers down a mere 9 horsepower and 13 lb-ft of torque from the base GS engine, yet 34 hp and 19 lb-ft of torque more capable than the outgoing ES 350, while Lexus now joins it up to an eight-speed automatic transmission instead of the six-speed gearbox found in the 2018 ES 350 and this year’s pricier GS. 

The ES 300h hybrid, which starts at $47,000, now gets an improved 176 horsepower 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine with 163 lb-ft of torque, plus a 67 horsepower (50 kW) electric motor and 29.1-kWh nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) battery, resulting in 215 net horsepower and an undisclosed amount of torque (the outgoing ES 300h’ net torque rating was 206 lb-ft). This fourth-generation Hybrid Synergy Drive system once again features a wonderfully smooth electronically controlled continuously variable transmission that works well in its luxury role, while minimizing fuel consumption. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
The new ES design is all about visual drama. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Fuel efficiency is the ES 300h’ strongpoint thanks to an amazing 5.5 L/100km city, 5.2 highway and 5.3 combined rating, which despite the aforementioned performance improvement makes last year’s 5.8, 6.1 and 5.9 respective ES 300h rating look merely so-so by comparison. 

The 2019 ES 300h also does better than Lincoln’s MKZ Hybrid, the domestic luxury sedan only capable of 5.7 L/100km in the city, 6.2 on the highway and 5.9 combined, while some additional comparisons worth noting include the regular ES 350 that manages a respectable 10.6 in the city, 7.2 on the highway and 9.1 combined, the same car with its F Sport styling enhancements that’s capable of 10.9, 7.5 and 9.4, and the regular GS 350 AWD with its 12.3, 9.1 and 10.9 rating. Last year’s GS 450h hybrid managed a fairly decent 8.0 in the city, 6.9 on the highway and 7.5 combined, incidentally, but it’s no longer offered so this point is moot unless you can still source a new one or don’t mind living with a pre-owned version. 

Finding a used GS might be a tad difficult being that they’re rare beasts. In fact, Lexus has only managed to deliver 82 examples in Canada up to August 31st of this year, compared to 1,445 ES units. This latter tally is actually the mid-size luxury sedan category’s second-best result, behind Mercedes’ E/CLS-Class, plus it’s also the segment’s best growth at 55.54 percent over the same initial eight months of 2018. Only two challengers saw any positive growth at all, including the same E/CLS-Class (that also includes a coupe and convertible) that saw its sales increase by 1.24 percent, plus the Audi A6 and A7 with 18.87 and 24.28 percent growth respectively, but these two models were only able to find 441 and 430 new buyers each so far this year. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
A tall wing-like rear deck lid and beautifully detailed taillights make the rear end design stand out. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Just in case you were questioning, the GS (with sales down 43.84 percent) didn’t find itself in last place thanks to Jaguar’s XF having nosedived some 52.89 percent with just 57 deliveries, while Acura’s RLX did even worse with just 40 sales after a drop of 24.53 percent, and finally Infiniti’s Q70 only sliding down by 2.56 percent but nevertheless managing just 38 units down the road. Purely from a percentage perspective, the mid-size sedan segment’s biggest loser is Lincoln’s Continental that lost 56.88 percent over the same eight months, whereas the car that came closest to entering positive territory but narrowly missing out was the G80 from Hyundai’s new Genesis brand with a slip of just 0.44 percent (sales information sourced from GoodCarBadCar.net). 

Such sales carnage in mind, it would be easy to forgive Lexus for eventually dropping the GS in favour of the ES, and while I’d personally be a bit glum after learning the brilliantly fun GS F was gone, I’d certainly support a CEO that chose to make good, sound business decisions over one simply wanting another super-fast sport sedan in the lineup. I know there’s a reasonably good case for having image cars in a brand’s fleet, but Lexus is already losing money with its sensational LC coupe, and that bit of low-slung eye-candy does a lot more to bolster Lexus’ brand image than a four-door sedan very few will ever see. So let’s pay attention to what Lexus does with these two models as we approach the upcoming decade. 

One thing’s for certain, the ES will continue to fulfill its unique calling in the luxury marketplace for years to come, and on top of that will soon have fewer challengers. The previously noted Continental is slated for cancellation, as is Lincoln’s more directly competitive MKZ that’s also offered as a hybrid electric. Cadillac will soon drop its front-wheel drive XTS and CTS luxury four-door models, whereas deliveries of its newer CT6 sedan are so slow they hardly rate. The only rivals not yet mentioned include BMW’s 5 Series, Volvo’s newish S90, and Tesla’s aging Model S, while some in the ES’ market might also consider Buick’s LaCrosse (also to be discontinued soon), Chrysler’s 300 (likely to be phased out), and possibly the impressive Kia Stinger, plus big mainstream luxury sedans like Toyota’s own Avalon that shares underpinnings with the ES, and finally Nissan’s Maxima, which also gets close to premium levels of performance and quality without a pricier premium nameplate. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
An entirely new level of pampering awaits 2019 ES owners, especially in top-line Ultra Luxury trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Just the same, the ES has sold in bigger numbers than most of these potential rivals despite its Lexus badge and often-pricier window sticker, and this brand new redesigned model should keep momentum up for many years to come. As mentioned before, the ES 350 and ES 300h hybrid are totally redesigned for 2019, and no matter whether it’s trimmed in base ES 350 form, enhanced with cooler ES 350 F Sport styling, or clothed in classy as-tested ES 300h togs, Lexus’ front-wheel drive four-door now provides a completely new level of visual drama to its exterior design. 

Lexus’ trademark spindle grille is bigger and much more expressive, while its origami-inspired LED headlamp clusters are more complex with sharper edges. Its side profile is longer and sleeker too, with a more pronounced front overhang and a swoopier sweep to its C pillars that now taper downward over a shorter, taller rear deck lid. Its hind end styling is more aggressive too, thanks to a much larger crescent-shaped spoiler that hovers above big triangular wrap-around LED tail lamps. 

The overall design plays with one’s mind, initially flowing smoothly from the front grille rearward, overtop the hood and down each sculpted side, before culminating into a clamour of dissonant creases, folds and cutlines at back. It all comes together well nevertheless, and certainly won’t cause anyone to utter the types of criticisms about yawn inducing styling that previous ES models endured. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
Lexus is now a design leader, while the ES feature set is also impressive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I could say the same about the new ES cabin, which instead of showing sharp edges now combines plenty of horizontal planes and softer angles with higher-grade materials than the outgoing model, not to mention a few design details pulled from the LFA supercar, such as the black knurled metal pods protruding from each side of the instrument hood, the left one for shutting off traction control, and the knob on the right for choosing Normal, Eco or Sport modes. 

In between these unusual pods is a standard digital instrument cluster that once again finds inspiration in the LFA supercar, plus plenty of lesser Lexus models since. This one provides real-time energy monitoring via a nice flowing graphic just to the left of the speedometer, while the big infotainment display over to the right, on top of the centre stack, measures 8.0 inches at the least, up to 12.3 inches as-tested, yet both look larger thanks to all the black glass bordering each side. The left portion hides a classic LED-backlit analogue clock, carrying on a Lexus tradition I happen to love. The high-definition display includes stylish graphics and deep, rich contrasting colours, plus it responds to inputs quickly. 

When choosing the as-tested ES 300h hybrid, the infotainment system now features standard Apple CarPlay, but I recommend integrating your smartphone to Lexus’ own Enform connectivity system. Enform is arguably more comprehensive and easier to use than the Android Auto interface my Samsung S9 is forced to use, although Android isn’t included anyway, while the list of standard Enform 2.0 apps includes fuel price updates, traffic incident details, and info on weather, sports, stocks, etcetera, while it’s also bundled with the Scout GPS Link navigation system, Slacker, Yelp, and more. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
This fully digital gauge package comes standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The new ES 300h also includes a new Remote Touch Interface trackpad controller on the lower console, which allows you to use smartphone/tablet-like gesture controls such as tap, pinch and swipe, and it works much better than previous versions, with more accurate responses, particularly when inputting via taps. Additional standard features include 17-inch alloy wheels, Bi-LED headlights, LED tail lamps, proximity keyless entry with pushbutton start/stop, a leather-wrapped steering wheel rim, rain-sensing windshield wipers, an auto-dimming centre mirror, a rearview camera with dynamic guidelines, a 10-speaker audio system with satellite radio, a deodorizing, dust and pollen filtered two-zone auto HVAC system, comfortable 10-way power-adjustable front seats with three-way heat and three-way forced cooling, NuLuxe breathable leatherette upholstery, all the usual active and passive safety equipment including 10 airbags, plus plenty more. 

Speaking of standard safety, the new ES 300h includes Lexus Safety System+ 2.0 that boasts autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian and bicycle detection, lane departure alert with steering assist and road edge detection, new Lane Tracing Assist (LTA) automated lane guidance, auto high beams, and full-speed range adaptive cruise control. 

The just-mentioned 12.3-inch infotainment display is part of an available $3,800 Premium package that also includes blind spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, reverse tilting mirrors, front and rear parking sonar, a heated steering wheel rim (which along with the heatable front seats turns on automatically upon startup), front seat and side mirror memory, a navigation system with ultra-detailed mapping and accurate route guidance, plus Enform Destination Assist that includes 24/7 live assistance for finding destinations or points of interest. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
The optional 12.3-inch infotainment display is superb. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Alternatively, you may want to opt for the even more comprehensive $10,600 Luxury package that includes everything from the Premium package while adding 18-inch alloy wheels, extremely bright Tri-LED headlamps, an always appreciated wireless smartphone charger, leather upholstery, and a powered rear window sunshade. 

Finally, the $14,500 Ultra Luxury package found on my tester combines everything in the Luxury package with a special set of 18-inch noise-reduction alloys, soft glowing ambient interior lighting, a really helpful 10-inch head-up display unit, an overhead surround-view parking camera system that makes parking a breeze, a fabulous sounding 17-speaker Mark Levinson premium audio system, softer semi-aniline leather upholstery, rear door sunshades, and a touch-free gesture control powered trunk lid. 

This $61,500 ES 300h was the most luxuriously equipped version of this car I’ve ever tested, while along with its resplendent interior it totally stepped up its all-round performance as well. Like with previous generations its ride quality cannot be faulted, with this newest version actually improving thanks to revisions to its fully independent front strut and rear multi-link suspension system. Newly developed Dynamic Control Shocks now feature an auxiliary valve next to the main damper valve so as to respond more quickly to smaller movements. The front suspension was reworked too, aiding both comfort and stability, while rear trailing arm and stabilizer bar mounting point adjustments helped minimize body lean during hard cornering, all of which resulted in an ES that feels a lot more agile through tight, twisting corners. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
The driver’s seat is excellent. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Yes, this latest ES 300h is actually a lot of fun to drive. Lexus even included a set of steering wheel paddles for swapping the continuously variable transmission’s simulated gears. It mimics the feel of real gears fairly well when set to Sport mode, while this edgier setting also increases torque at low speeds for better acceleration, and places a tachometer right in the middle of the digital gauge cluster. Owners concerned more about economical or environmental issues may prefer Eco mode, which helps to reduce fuel consumption and lower emissions, whereas EV mode allows the ES 300h to crawl silently through parking lots, slow moving traffic, and other low speed situations for short periods of time. 

Another efficiency enhancer is new Auto Glide Control, which lets the ES to coast more freely upon throttle lift-off, instead of being slowed automatically via the automatic regenerative braking system. 

No matter how fast or slow you’re traveling, the slippery ES is extremely quiet due to a doubling of structural adhesive, which improves NVH levels, while it also features sound-deadening front fender liners and underbody covers, plus insulation covering 93 percent of the new ES 300h’s floor pan, which is a significant increase when compared to the outgoing model’s 68 percent of floor pan coverage. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
Rear seat roominess and comfort is top notch. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The previously noted battery, which is now positioned below the rear seat instead of the trunk, is smaller than the one used in last year’s hybrid, but impressively it’s more powerful. Its new location not only improves front/rear balance, but also allows for more cargo space. In fact, the ES 300h’ trunk is now identically sized to the conventionally powered ES 350 at 473 litres (16.7 cu ft). The redesign provides access for a centre pass-through too, which is large enough for skis or other long items, so therefore rear passengers can now enjoy the more comfortable outboard seats, which are incidentally even nicer than the previous model’s rear seats. 

All interior finishings are better than the outgoing model’s appointments, by the way, with the improvements including higher quality soft synthetic surfacing, plus more of it. The lower door panels remain hard shell plastic, as do the sides of the centre console, but most everything else is soft to the touch. I like that Lexus positioned its wireless device charger below the armrest within the centre console bin, as my phone was less of a distraction. 

Additionally, all switchgear has been improved over previous generations, with some notable details including those cool metal pods I mentioned earlier, which stick out each side of the instrument cluster, plus the tiny round metal buttons on the centre stack are nicely finished, these used for controlling the radio, media, and seek/track functions. The temperature control switches are particularly stylish and well made too, and, while not switchgear, the Mark Levinson-branded speaker grilles and surrounds on the upper door panels are really attractive as well. The hardwood trim feels real because it is, and comes in Striated Black, Linear Dark Mocha or Linear Espresso, while the metallic accents are nicely finished and not overdone. 

2019 Lexus ES 300h
The new ES 300h hybrid’s trunk is now just as large as the conventionally powered ES 350’s. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I’ve spent plenty of weeks behind the wheel of various Lexus ES generations over the past 20 years or so, in both conventionally powered and electrified forms, and now that I’ve spent yet another seven days with this entirely new 2019 ES 300h I can confidently predict that ES lovers will without doubt like this version best. It incorporates all the ES qualities you’ve grown to appreciate, yet steps up every aspect of quality, refinement and performance. Truly, this is one of the best entry-level luxury sedans I’ve ever tested. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T Road Test

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
The 2019 Genesis G90 is now being replaced by an all-new model, but this base 3.3T AWD model is still an impressive luxury sedan that can be had for a great price. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

If you can remember back as far as 2010, or even 2016 when it was cancelled, you might recall a full-size Hyundai luxury sedan that went by the name of Equus. Despite selling poorly here it has long been a favourite amongst high-ranking executives and dignitaries in South Korea, much like the Toyota Celsior was one of the most respected executive sedans in Japan until the fourth-generation Lexus’ LS replaced it (although Toyota still sells the upmarket Crown and Rolls-Royce-like Century in its home market). Like the LS, the Equus is no more thanks to the new Genesis brand, which is to Hyundai like Lexus is to Toyota. 

I tested and reviewed a 2014 Hyundai Equus and was mostly impressed, other than its nondescript styling. It came with V6- and V8-powered rear drivetrains, and was sized similarly to the Mercedes S-Class and BMW 7 Series, yet even though it delivered a premium-like interior, plenty of high-end features, strong performance, and excellent value, it didn’t sell well, as noted. The fact is, those spending into the high five figures want a premium badge to go along with their luxury ride, something aforementioned Toyota learned a long time ago with its Lexus line, as did Nissan with Infiniti and Honda with Acura before both. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
Stylish lines from front to back. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Along with a new name, pulled from the mid-size Hyundai Genesis that was especially attractive in its second-generation form, the third-generation Equus debuted in 2016 as the first-generation Genesis G90, soon followed by a rebadged Genesis G80 that saw little more than a name change. Along with its home market in South Korea, the Genesis brand was immediately made available in the United States, China, the Middle East, Russia, Australia, and of course here in Canada. This said, Hyundai has plans to launch the upmarket brand in other Asian markets too, plus Europe within the next couple of years, but they might want to wait for a couple of SUVs to arrive before they do. 

In hindsight it’s easy to see that Hyundai jumped the gun by introducing this sedan-only luxury brand without having at least one SUV in the lineup, but sales of the G80’s predecessor were quite strong when it made the decision in 2015 and the rest is now history. This said if the Genesis brand’s future line of sport utilities impress as well as its trio of sport-luxury sedans (the smaller C-Class/3 Series-rivaling G70 was introduced last year), and better than the superb new Hyundai Palisade that just went on sale for 2020, things are about to seriously heat up in the luxury SUV segment. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
LED headlights, fog lamps and 19-inch alloys come standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

While writing this review I was already seeing the completely redesigned 2020 Genesis G90 advertised on its retail website. It boasts a totally new version of its stylish “diamond” grille featuring a more distinctive downward pointing lower section and “G-MATRIX” crosshatch patterned insert replacing the current car’s seven horizontal ribs. It also sports a set of LED “Quad Lamp” headlamps, plus Bentley-like front fender vents, large attractive mesh-patterned wheels, and three unique horizontal LED taillights, the lower element crossing the width of the entire car, while inside it’s wholly modernized from a design and digitization standpoint, plus even more luxurious than this outgoing model. 

As stylish as I find the new model, I still like this 2019 G90. No doubt unplanned, but the G90’s slow sales and resultant nullibiety have had the side benefit of keeping it somewhat fresh looking, the opposite case of ubiquity causing some designs that were once wonderfully unique to become mundanely commonplace and therefore hardly exclusive anymore. The G90’s design language is more conservative than the new model and much more discreet than, say, the spindle grilled Lexus LS, making this G90 a good choice for folks who’d rather fly under the radar than always attracting attention. The Audi A8 once had such understated appeal as well, but its horseshoe-shaped grille has now grown to encompass most of its front fascia, and while still a smart looking car it’s now considerably bolder and more intimidating than before. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
Its LED taillights get nice details inside. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Like any new brand Genesis is still searching for an easily identifiable trademark look, evidenced by the just-mentioned lower point on the new 2020 model’s diamond-shaped grille, and this quest is made even more important when factoring in that the new brand’s general design language started off wearing Hyundai’s italicized “H” on its backside (interestingly there was no Hyundai badging other than that). Lexus took decades before opting for and sticking with its spindle grille and sharply carved origami-angled design language, as did Infiniti and Acura with their more recently updated grille treatments, the latter being the oldest Japanese luxury marque yet its dramatic new grille was just adopted a few of years ago. Still, it’s important to find a memorable design and then stick to it. 

Genesis grille has been sometimes criticized for its Audi-like appearance, but with Hyundai-Kia’s head of design being ex-Audi stylist Peter Schreyer, some similarity makes sense. There’s a bit of 7 Series in the front fender’s sweeping lines and along the sculpted rocker panel, plus its thick chrome strip down each side and around the back, but the taillights are pure Genesis, and its rather unoriginal feathered badge gets too close to Bentley’s winged-B for comfort. Its build quality is excellent, however, with tight exterior panel gaps and superb paintwork. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
Get ready for an impressive premium interior. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Inside, the G90’s design is good looking and attention to detail excellent. From its microfibre roofliner and pillars to the padded and French-stitched leather that runs across the dash top and door uppers front to back, plus the planks of glossy hardwood all-round, it totally measures up to its German competitors. I won’t stop there, of course, as the G90’s plentiful aluminum interior accents is nicely executed, particularly the Lexicon-branded speaker grilles and aluminized switchgear on the centre stack, while all of the other buttons, knobs, toggles and rockers are impressively crafted with ideal fitment and good damping. It’s totally in the league of Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Audi, prestige aside. 

I’d say the classic dress watch style analogue clock in the centre of the instrument panel is one of autodom’s best, featuring a gorgeous white guilloche dial, Arabic numerals at 12, 3, 6 and 9, plus chromed indices marking the hours between. The perforated seat leather is incredibly soft and supple, plus the seats themselves are excellent, with plenty of adjustments to fit most any body. Additionally, you’ll have a difficult time finding any hard shell plastic in this car, the only corners cut being the steering column surround and the very bottom of each lower center console side, but even these panels are made from a dense composite material before soft painted for a high-quality texture. I’m not going to come out and say this G90 is a step up from its rivals, because everything in this category will impress, but it’s very well done. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
With acres of wood, leather and metal, yet hardly any hard plastic, Genesis provides an high-quality interior. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

On that note the backs of each front seat are so impressively finished they must be getting close to best-of-the-best, particularly the curving wood inlays that wrap around their upper edges. Mind you, the backside of the front centre console is hardly notable, with typical HVAC vents finished nicely, but it looks spartan due to a folding centre armrest that’s filled with features, as well as beautiful leathers, woods and metals. Included are controls for the automatic climate control system’s rear zone, plus three-way heatable outboard seats, controls for the powered side and rear sunshades, and you can also extend the car’s right-side legroom by powering the front passenger seat forward and tipping its seatback as well. Full infotainment controls are included too, letting rear occupants take control of that wonderful sounding Lexicon audio system noted earlier. 

Back behind the steering wheel, the gauge cluster isn’t a fully configurable digital design, but its centre is filled with a large colour multi-information display integrating the usual assortment functions. The infotainment touchscreen to the right is much more advanced, with attractive albeit simple graphics enhanced by deep colours and contrast, and a very clear reverse camera with dynamic guidelines, but no overhead bird’s eye view. The navigation was easy to sort out, provided good mapping detail and found where we were going, which is always a bonus. Buyers wanting a more advanced level of infotainment technology, including a completely digital gauge package and higher definition infotainment display, should pay more for the 2020 G90, but I could appreciate that others might choose to avail themselves of year-end and model-ending 2019 G90 discounting that could be quite aggressive. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
The new 2020 G90 includes a fully digital gauge cluster, but this one works well and the multi-info display is large and functional. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Before negotiating, my V6 turbo-powered 2019 G90 3.3T AWD tester can be had for just $84,000 plus destination, whereas the V8-powered G90 5.0 AWD starts at $87,000; its only upgrade being the $2,500 rear entertainment package. The much-improved 2020 model will come completely equipped for just $89,750, a mere $250 more than the outgoing V8 model, and that more formidable eight-cylinder is now standard. You will still be able to acquire the turbocharged V6, but take note it’s a special order model that will save you $3k. On this note, all 2019 G90 pricing, including trims and packages, can be found right here at CarCostCanada, plus we can also provide you with rebate information as well as dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

The G90 I tested was in its base 3.3T AWD trim, which means that standard features included a 3.3-litre twin-turbo direct-injection V6 good for 365 horsepower and 376 lb-ft of torque, plus an eight-speed shift-by-wire automatic transmission with manual mode and steering wheel paddles, HTRAC torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, 19-inch alloys on 245/45 front and 275/40 rear all-seasons rubber, an adaptive suspension, full LED headlights with adaptive cornering and automatic high beams, adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability, autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection, active blindspot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, lane change assist and lane keeping assist, the multi-view parking camera with dynamic guidelines mentioned earlier, a 12.3-inch centre display with 720p resolution (which isn’t all that clear compared to most competitors’ high-definition systems) and the navigation system noted a moment ago, the wonderful Nappa leather upholstery and microfibre suede headliner also mentioned before, the 17-speaker Lexicon AM/FM/XM/MP3 audio system with Quantum Logic surround sound and Clari-Fi, etcetera, etcetera. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
A large 12.3-inch infotainment display, impressive switchgear and a gorgeous clock finish off the centre stack. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

If you’re willing to spend just $3,000 more for 5.0 AWD trim, you’ll not only receive an impressive 420 horsepower direct-injection V8 with 383 lb-ft of torque, but you’ll also be able to pamper each rear passenger (or yourself if you hire a driver) with a 14-way powered right rear seat and 12-way powered left rear seat, including powered head restraints with manual tilt, plus memory and cooling ventilation for outboard occupants, and illuminated vanity mirrors overhead. 

I’ve driven a number Genesis, Hyundai and Kia models with the 5.0-litre Tau V8 and have nothing but good things to say about it. It’s a blast at full throttle yet is wonderfully smooth and quiet, ideal for long high-speed freeway journeys and even impressive when pushed hard through curves. The engine ideally matches up with the smooth yet quick-shifting eight-speed automatic, and Hyundai’s HTRAC AWD is grippy on wet road surfaces and even improving performance in dry conditions. I can only imagine the V8 would perform as well with the G90 as it did in the most recent 2017 Genesis G80 5.0 AWD Ultimate I reviewed a couple of years ago, but I have to say there’s much to like about Genesis’ smaller, more fuel-friendly 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 too. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
The multi-adjustable driver’s seat is ultra comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Claimed fuel economy ratings are reason enough to choose the V6, it good for an estimated 13.7 L/100km city, 9.7 highway and 11.9 combined, compared to the V8 that only gets a claimed 15.2, 10.2 and 13.0 respectively. That difference would certainly be noticeable in the wallet, while the smaller engine’s performance is certainly capable of whisking the big sedan and all passengers away quickly, albeit not providing as audibly stimulating an exhaust note. 

The V6 weighs less too, and being that this weight sits over the front wheels it feels a little more agile through the corners, and was especially fun when Sport mode was engaged. It just hunkers down and flings itself through fast-paced curves with hardly a squeak from the tires, portraying the kind of poise expected of the big German luxury sedans. The G90 is truly a great driving car, with handling that comes close to the almighty 7 Series. Without doubt the adaptive suspension plays its part, while also keeping its ride quality compliant and cabin quiet. 

With performance this impressive, you’d think I’d always keep it in Sport mode, but Eco mode reduced fuel consumption, while Smart mode is capable of choosing the best of both worlds as per a given driver’s inputs. Fortunately the G90 has all bases covered, the result being a very well rounded, highly refined luxury sedan that truly deserves much more attention than it gets. 

2019 Genesis G90 3.3T AWD
No one will complain about rear seat comfort. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Dip your feet into the deep pile carpet floor mats, however, and you’ll quickly be reminded of the G90’s true purpose. It’s a luxury sedan first and foremost, which is why Genesis needed to make it practical as well. Along with the spacious rear passenger compartment, its trunk is generously sized for multiple golf bags and easy access. Its powered lid is gesture controlled and lift-over height nice and low for loading in gear, while a convenient centre pass-through allows for longer cargo like skis. 

If you’re looking for a resplendent luxury sedan with sporting pretensions, yet don’t want the taxman to question how you came into wealth, consider this G90. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

The new Porsche Taycan is finally here and its top-line 750-hp Turbo S is awesome

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The 2020 Taycan Turbo S redefines electrified performance. (Photo: Porsche)

Not many cars have been as enthusiastically anticipated as the new Porsche Taycan, and now production model has finally arrived at the 2019 IAA in Frankfurt, Germany. 

To say that it’s powerful seems as bizarrely understated as merely calling it quick. Take a deep breath and then consider that its most formidable variant makes an outrageous 750 horsepower and even more mind-blowing 774 lb-ft of torque, its collective force allowing for a 2.8-second blast from zero to 100 km/h. 

Such performance is nothing new to Tesla aficionados, the California brand’s Model S P100D good for a 0 to 100 km/h run of only 2.6 seconds, but how it achieves that feat with just 613 horsepower and 686 lb-ft of torque available is beyond me (although the fact that its heaviest curb weight of 2,250 kg/4,960 lbs is lower than the Taycan’s 2,295-kg/5,059-lb unladen weight probably has something to do with it). Then again, Porsche has a tendency to understate performance specifications; this brewing up to be an epic drag race that every credible cable and YouTube automotive show will be covering. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The Taycan sports a stunning new design that will influence future Porsche models for years to come. (Photo: Porsche)

This said, Porsche’s faithful care more going fast around corners than merely burning up the asphalt in a straight line. To prove the Taycan’s dominance through tight twisting curves, Porsche took a pre-series example to the legendary Nürburgring-Nordschleife racetrack and quickly set an EV lap-record of 7:42 minutes, which just so happened to obliterate the last Tesla Model S P85D’s 8:50 lap time by over a minute. A minute off the pace around any racetrack is downright embarrassing, making us willing to bet that Tesla will soon show up in Nürburg, Rhineland-Palatinate with its more recently introduced P100D, plus a complete crew and an experienced driver. 

In Tesla’s corner is price, because any 2020 Taycan Turbo is much more expensive than even a fully featured Model S P100D. The 2020 Taycan Turbo, which makes 671 maximum horsepower in launch mode, 627 lb-ft of torque, and can achieve a 3.2-second run from zero to 100 km/h, is now ready to order for $173,900 plus freight, whereas the new top-tier Taycan Turbo S is available from $213,900. Making matters more interesting, these two models aren’t even fully loaded, with Porsche’s many pricey options capable of driving its price up and over $250,000, which is a range normally associated with Aston Martin Rapides, Bentley Flying Spurs and Rolls-Royce Ghosts (ok, maybe a used R-R). 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
While straight-line acceleration is important in this class, the Taycan’s forte is high-speed control around corners. (Photo: Porsche)

None of the super sedans above are capable of completing the 100-yard dash as quickly or scaling a mountain pass with the level of fleet finesse as a Taycan, however, while none will get the job done without chugging down a tanker’s full of premium unleaded gasoline. Back to electrics, a new 2019 Model S can be had for a comparatively bargain basement $108,990, while its sportier Performance trim line will set you back a mere $134,990 before creeping up to $155k when all options are added. Still, that seems like chump change next to a Taycan Turbo or Turbo S. 

If you’re starting to feel like Porsche has forgotten simpler folk that can barely afford anything into six figures, we can take a little comfort in knowing that these super-fast Turbo variants (in name only, as there are no turbos at play) are merely being introduced first for their jaw-dropping wow factor. Later this year additional less powerful trims will be added to bring the price down from their current cirrus-pheric levels to mere stratospheric realms, but the upcoming Cross Turismo crossover coupe, which will directly take on Jaguar’s I-Pace toward the end of 2020, will no doubt have a full range of more and less accessible window stickers. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The new Taycan’s interior looks very inviting. (Photo: Porsche)

While performance matters, styling will probably play a bigger role in consumer choices when opting for either the Taycan or Model S. The new Porsche is completely new and inarguably good looking, whereas the Model S has been in production for seven years with very few changes. Fit, finish and interior refinement isn’t exactly a Model S strong point either, but expect only the industry’s best materials and workmanship within the new Porsche, while Stuttgart’s various on-board electronic systems are as good as digital displays get. 

To that end the Taycan includes a fully digital pod-like gauge cluster that appears to float on its own behind the steering wheel. The black background of its classic Porsche curved oval area gets filled with colourful high-definition graphics that should appeal to both experienced EV users as well as long-time Porsche owners, while the two touchscreens that span the centre and right-side of the dash, the second display in front of the passenger, and the third capacitive touchscreen atop the sloped centre console (a la Range Rover), are digital eye candy and ideal for optimal control of the car’s myriad functions. 

One of those screens no doubt includes animated power-flow graphics that show a permanent-magnet synchronous motor powering each axle, combining for the previously noted output numbers depending on the model chosen, although it should be noted that both make 616 horsepower when not in launch mode. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The fully digital gauge cluster takes its overall oval shape from classic Porsche models. (Photo: Porsche)

With that overboost setting switched back on, the slower of the two Taycan models can launch from standstill to 200 km/h in a scant 10.6 seconds, while this car’s standing quarter mile arrives in just 11.1 seconds. Do the same with the more formidable Turbo S and the 200-km/h mark arrives in just 9.8 seconds, while the quarter mile zips past in only 10.8. Both trims top out at 280 km/h (161 mph), an electronically limited top speed. 

To achieve such performance the new Porsche incorporates some ultra-sophisticated tech, such as a single-speed front transmission and a larger two-speed rear gearbox. The latter transmission incorporates one gear for acceleration and another taller one for higher speed cruising. It chooses between rear gear sets automatically by monitoring a driver’s style, but it can also be done manually by selecting one of five drive modes. Just like it sounds, Range mode optimizes efficiency and therefore employs the taller second gear as often as possible while temporarily shutting down the front motor, whereas Normal mode makes the second gear the priority, yet uses the first gear a bit more. Sport mode, on the other hand, prioritizes first gear up to about 90 to 100 km/h, although it shifts to the second gear whenever throttle pressure is eased, and then goes back to first when needed. The Taycan also includes Sport Plus and Individual driving modes. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
Taycan infotainment is divided between three touchscreens, two across the top and one on the lower console. (Photo: Porsche)

Anyone who’s owned a Tesla knows about overheating, the Model S notorious for it, especially when trying to execute consecutive full-power standing starts. Rather than grandfather this problem onto new Taycan buyers, Porsche has designed cooler running electric motors that feature a special hairpin winding technique to the stators’ copper solenoid coils. The result is a copper fill factor of 70 percent compared to 45 percent when those coils are wound the traditional way, giving the Taycan better more reliable performance. 

In order to prove its point, Porsche endurance-tested the new Taycan in ultra-hot climates (of 42°C with a track temperature of nearly 54°C). A pre-production model circled Italy’s high-banked Nardò Ring oval racetrack at speeds ranging between 195 and 215 km/h for 24 hours straight, the marathon including six test drivers covering 3,425 km (2,128 m). Following up this punishing test program was another test that saw the new Porsche undergo 26 back-to-back launches from standstill to 200 km/h of less than 10 seconds each, with an average of 0.8 seconds variance between fastest and slowest acceleration times. Then we have the Nürburgring event noted earlier, with performance that should completely set the Taycan apart from the Model S. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The four-place interior appears plenty practical. (Photo: Porsche)

Below the floorboards of both Taycan Turbo models is a 93.4-kilowatt-hour high-voltage lithium-ion battery sourced from LG, with enough stored energy to drive for 381 to 450 km (237 to 280 miles) based on the European WLTP rating system. The more quicker Turbo S also offers more range, its expected distance from fully topped up to near empty being 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 miles). 

Making all this happen is an industry-first 800-volt electrical architecture, this also providing for faster recharging when an appropriate 270-kW charge station can be found (or installed in your home). How fast can it be refilled? How does five to 80 percent in just 22.5 minutes sound? Sure that’s a long wait for those used to filling up at a gas station, but anyone familiar with an electric car will know this is incredibly quick. 

Porsche’s Charging Planner makes the process of charging even easier, or at least can maximize one’s efficiency when traveling. For instance, when it charts a given route it factors in the best places to recharge along the way, even if it driving a bit farther out of the way for a quicker 270-kW charge station (which will save a lot of time over a regular 50-kW DC charger) is needed. What’s more, the Charging Planner will precondition the battery to 20°C for faster recharging. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
Its 800-volt architecture means a 270-kW charger can fill its battery from 5 to 80 percent in just 22.5 minutes. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the new 2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo and Turbo S are now available to build and order from Porsche Canada’s retail website, or you can place an order through your neighbourhood Porsche dealer, but you’ll want to act quickly if being amongst the first in your city to own one matters. This is the first electric car ever capable of truly taking on Tesla’s quickest Model S, making it about as important as any EV built within the last seven years. 

And while waiting to take delivery of your new Taycan, or simply hoping for those lottery ticket numbers to match the bouncing balls on TV, enjoy the complete album of gallery photos above and generous supply of Porsche-sourced videos below: 

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

World Premiere Porsche Taycan (40:33):

 

The new Porsche Taycan – Designed to enliven (1:28):

 

The fully electric Porsche Taycan accelerates 0-90-0 mph on the USS Hornet (0:59):

 

Onboard Lap – Porsche Taycan Sets a Record at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife (8:09):

 

New Porsche Taycan sets a record at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife (0:58):

 

Taycan Prototype Convinces at Endurance Run in Nardò (0:57):

 

The new electric Porsche Taycan proves its repeatability of power before upcoming World Premiere (1:05):

 

A thank you to electricity: The Porsche Taycan (0:45):

 

Buying a New Car as a College Student? Here’s How to Stay Within Budget!

College is an exciting and challenging time. Between 7 am classes, tons of homework and, whew, student loans, you have a lot of your plate. But now you’ve decided to invest in a new car so you can travel faster and more conveniently. That’s great news! Naturally, you want something that stays well within budget.

Buying a new car is a phenomenal experience. Well, actually, owning a new car is a phenomenal experience. Buying one? Not as much. 

We understand that you’re super new to this and need a little help. If you’re curious about, say, the price of a Honda, Car Cost Canada has got your back! This article helps you simplify the negotiation and reveals how you can find out the invoice price on your new car in Canada in a matter of minutes!

Like most new car buyers, you might be wondering; just what is the invoice price of a car? The invoice price or dealer cost is the sum of money paid by the dealership to gain ownership of the car. It includes the cost of the base model and all add-ons. The figure is typically much lower than the advertised figures, the latter of which is referred to as the MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price).

When you shop smart and get a car dealer invoice report, you can skip the MSRP and pay a much lower fee.

Check the Age of the Car

When shopping around for a new ride, go for a model that’s less than 8 years old.  You’ll need a car that has easily available parts that do not call for frequent replacements. 

When you approach the dealers, make sure you have someone with you who is experienced in purchasing cars. Certain salespersons might deceive new buyers about the state of the motor vehicles. 

By taking an experienced person with you, you’re enhancing your bargaining power and the likelihood of getting the best value for your money. 

Set the Ground Rules

Do your research on the car you have in mind before you set foot into the dealership. Instead of dropping by the dealers and letting the salesperson sway your opinion, tell them you already have a vehicle selected. Convey the trim level and add-ons that you wish to invest in, keeping in mind the price for that configuration. 

When the salesperson senses you’re a novice who doesn’t have a specific model and trim level in mind, they’ll pull out all the stops to get you to invest in expensive and unnecessary add-ons. 

Reassure them that both parties are emerging from a mutually beneficial deal, and ask if they’re willing to match your target price. If not, don’t be afraid to tell them that you’d prefer to go to another dealership. When they see you’re willing to let the deal fall through, they are all the more likely to be open to reason. 

Purchase At the End of the Month

Business slows down at the end of the month and most salespersons are looking to make one final sale. It stands to reason that they’re more amenable and willing to be open to your negotiation tactics. If you want to go one better, try buying your car at the end of a quarter – March, June, September or December. This will help you save even further. 

We suggest shopping for the car early in the month and actually buying it much later, meaning get the test drive done early and narrow the list when the month is closing up shop. 

Access Great Rebates With a Free Car Dealer Invoice Report

A dealer invoice report is honestly every college student’s best friend when car shopping. This report is meant to provide a breakdown of all fees, including the hidden car fees that most people aren’t aware of. That way, you will know exactly how much you’re paying for that trim level and how to negotiate smartly. 

Your report will reveal;

  • MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price – what the dealer paid to own the car)
  • Factory incentives and rebates
  • Lease and finance rates
  • Recommended dealerships
  • Vehicle pricing options
  • Comparable vehicles

A majority of dealers turn a profit of 8.7% on selling a new car. When you’re aware of the true MSRP, you can follow the 3-5% rule – meaning you can add about 3-5% on the invoice figure in your report to calculate the most lucrative negotiation price. 

 

At Car Cost Canada, you can have your cake and eat it too. Get a great car at your dream price. 

Your report is ready and waiting! Get it here. 

Budgeting For a New Car? Don’t Overspend, Follow These 5 Easy Steps!

Buying a new car is such an exciting experience. But wait, it isn’t just about cruising down to your local dealership and picking out your next ride. The first step? Budgeting! The main hitch that most novice car buyers face is that they assume the price instead of actually crunching the numbers. 

Naturally, this leads to spending more than bargained for. To avoid this scenario and make sure your next car fits seamlessly into the budget, it’s important to know the dealer invoice price in Canada. Moreover, let’s say you’re shopping for an Acura, Car Cost Canada can help you access great rebates and incentives, and save you the hassle of negotiation.

Without further ado, let’s explore 5 tips to ensure that you don’t break the bank with your next ride!

 

  1. Calculate Your Monthly Expenses

Before delving into your new car purchase, gather your most recent credit card statements; mortgage, utility, cell, and internet bills. Bifurcate all monthly expenses into two sections; fixed and variable. The former should include those that involve a flat unwavering figure; rent, whereas the latter includes items like your grocery bills that change from one month to the next. 

  1. Take Into Account Your Disposable Income

From your monthly income subtract your total expenses. Then decide how much of this figure is disposable and how much you want to put away for a rainy day. A great rule of thumb is to not spend over 10% of your household income on a single-vehicle. In the end, the amount you splurge on your car wholly depends on the breadth of your other expenses. 

  1. Familiarize Yourself With Ownership Costs

There’s a difference between how much you can spend and how much you should spend. Car ownership fees include insurance, financing, maintenance, fuel, and depreciation. This can roughly amount to $790 every month. 

The biggest strain on your wallet will be depreciation. In fact, it is estimated that a car depreciates by as high as 30% the moment you drive it off the lot. Fuel, interest, and insurance follow close on the heels of this expense. Once you’ve tabulated ownership costs, it’ll be easy to narrow down your options to cars that can stay within budget. 

  1. Consider Future Costs

If you’re looking at a long car loan, remember that your financial situation in the future will be somewhat constrained. Take into account other expenses like rent that may increase in the future, making it tricky for you to afford your car payments. Since this can divert your budget in a big way, it’s best to factor them into your current disposable income. 

  1. Get a Free Dealer Invoice Report

The last and final step is to get a free dealer invoice report. Your report will reveal;

  • MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price – what the dealer paid to own the car)
  • Factory incentives
  • Lease and finance rates
  • Recommended dealerships
  • Vehicle pricing options
  • Comparable vehicles

A majority of dealers turn a profit of 8.7% on selling a new car. When you’re aware of the true MSRP, you can follow the 3-5% rule – meaning you can add about 3-5% on the invoice figure in your report to calculate the most lucrative negotiation price. 

It’s simple! Choose your make and model and see a complete breakdown of all fees. 

Get a FREE dealer invoice report in your email within minutes. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier Road Test

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
The new 2019 Subaru Ascent is one great looking mid-size family hauler. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To say the mid-size crossover SUV category is growing would be quite the understatement. In fact, when brands might have once been satisfied with one single entry in either the two- or three-row sectors, now we’re seeing separate models addressing various families’ requirements, and then unique trim levels targeting luxury, sport, and off-road oriented buyers. If you’re a volume manufacturer, or even a niche player, trying to find success without a mid-size SUV in the lineup is like a company selling it wares without using social media. It’s not going to happen. 

Prior to the new 2019 Ascent arrived on the market last autumn, Subaru had been AWOL from this critically important segment since its previous mid-size crossover, the 2005 to 2014 Tribeca, went out of production. That SUV was impressive for a number of reasons, particularly its premium-like refinement, but its styling and third-row spaciousness left would-be buyers searching elsewhere. After five years of contemplation, and no doubt designing and product planning, Subaru is back with a three-row mid-size crossover SUV that won’t disappoint anyone when it comes to size, plus it looks pretty good too. 

Even though two-row crossover SUVs lead the mid-size sector in individual sales, Subaru already does well with its compact five-seat Forester and mid-size Outback crossover wagon, so it made sense for them to target larger families and those requiring more cargo space. They’re not alone, Honda having sold its three-row Pilot for 17 years ahead its new two-row Passport arriving this summer, so possibly we’ll see a bigger five-seat Subaru SUV at some point too. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
What do you think? Does its styling appeal to your senses? (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Until that happens, the North American-exclusive Ascent seats eight in standard form or seven with its optional second-row captain’s chairs, the latter configuration being how Subaru equipped my top-tier Premier tester. It’s a sizeable SUV, stretching 4,998 millimetres (196.8 inches) nose to tail with a 2,890-mm (113.8-inch) wheelbase, while its overall height stands 1,819 mm (71.6 inches) tall including its standard roof rails. What’s more, it measures 2,176 mm (85.6 inches) wide with its side mirrors extracted, plus its track spans 1,635 mm (64.4 inches) up front and 1,630 mm (64.2 inches) at the rear. 

Putting this into perspective, the new Ascent is 48 mm (1.9 inches) shorter than the mid-size three-row SUV category’s top-selling Explorer, albeit with a 24-mm (0.9-inch) longer wheelbase, and some might be surprised to learn that the new Subaru SUV also stands 42 mm (1.6 inches) taller than the big Ford. The only Explorer dimension to exceed the Ascent is width that sees Ford’s SUV 119 mm (4.7 inches) wider, with 66 and 71 mm (2.6 and 2.8 inches) more respective front and rear track too. Considering the Explorer is one of the mid-size segment’s biggest crossover SUVs, Subaru now has something equally large so that no one gets left behind. 

When comparing the new Ascent to other sales leaders, it’s longer, wider and taller than the Toyota Highlander and Kia Sorento (albeit shorter than the new Kia Telluride, with a shorter wheelbase and less width), longer and taller than the Honda Pilot and Hyundai Santa Fe XL (which is currently in its final days, but take note it’s slightly longer than the new Hyundai Palisade too, but its wheelbase isn’t, nor its width), wider and taller than the Nissan Pathfinder, merely wider than the Dodge Durango, and only taller than the Volkswagen Atlas. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
The finer details in Premier trim are very impressive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

That was only a partial list of the Ascent’s three-row mid-size crossover SUV challengers, incidentally, the full list (from top-selling to poorest faring during the first three quarters of 2018) being the Explorer, Sorento, Highlander, Atlas, Pilot, Durango, Pathfinder, Chevrolet Traverse, Santa Fe XL, Dodge Journey, GMC Acadia, Mazda CX-9, and Ford Flex, while the just-mentioned Palisade and Telluride are too new to categorize by sales numbers. 

While exterior size is one thing, passenger volume and cargo space is another, and much more important for making decisions. The Ascent provides 4,347 litres (153.5 cubic feet) of passenger volume and 2,449 litres (86.5 cu ft) for cargo when both rear rows are folded down. Those numbers are just for the most basic of Ascent trims, incidentally, which also measures 1,345 litres (47.5 cu ft) behind the 60/40-split second row and 504 litres (17.8 cu ft) behind the 60/40-split third row, while all other trims are half a litre less commodious at 2,435 litres (86.0 cu ft) behind the first row, 1,331 litres (47.0 cu ft) aft of the second row, and 498 litres (17.6 cu ft) in the very back. 

These numbers compare well against key rivals, with the Ascent’s passenger volume even greater than the Explorer’s, and its standard eight-occupant seating layout a rarity in the class, while the big Subaru’s max cargo volume makes it one of the segment’s largest too. Also helpful, rear passengers gain easier access due to back doors that open up to 75 degrees. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
The Ascent even looks good covered in mud, and performs well off-road too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As with most Subaru models, the Ascent comes standard with full-time Symmetrical AWD, which has long proven to be amongst the more capable of all-wheel drive systems available. Its first advantage is more evenly balanced weight distribution thanks to a longitudinally mounted engine and transmission, compared to the AWD designs of competitors that mostly derive them from FWD chassis architectures incorporating transverse-mounted engines. Subaru’s horizontally opposed flat “boxer” engine also let the designers place it lower in the chassis resulting in a lower centre of gravity, which aids packaging and handling. 

The Symmetrical AWD design automatically applies additional torque to the wheels with the most grip, and it’s done in such a way that traction not only improves when taking off from standstill in slippery conditions, but it also benefits overall control at higher speeds. This means the Ascent is very capable on all types of roads and trail surfaces, while its standard X-mode off-road system, together with hill descent control, as well as a sizeable 220 millimetres (8.66 inches) of ground clearance for overcoming rocks and stumps, snow banks, etcetera, makes it better for tackling tough terrain than most other crossover SUVs. 

Of course I had to off-road it, and when facing the mud and muck I pressed the X-Mode button on the lower console and let it do the rest while I pointed it where I wanted to go. Amazingly it responded almost as well as the bull low gearing range of a truck-based 4×4, although the sound of all the electronic systems, such as traction and stability control, working away in the background as it climbed some very steep, ultra slippery, deeply rutted and just plain yucky sections of trail I would have normally only tried when at the wheel of a Jeep Wrangler, Toyota 4Runner, or something more dedicated to mucking it up, was out of the ordinary. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
Premier trim’s three-tone black, ivory and brown interior colour theme looks amazing. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Fortunately the Ascent took care of my backside thanks to one of the nicer rides in the mid-size class, but I wouldn’t say it’s the sportiest feeling or best handling in this three-row category. It’s fully capable of being pushed hard through a twisting back road at a fast clip, but keep in mind this Subie was clearly designed for comfort before speed. 

It rides on the new Subaru Global Platform (SGP) architecture, which combines a strong yet lightweight unibody construction with a fully independent MacPherson strut front and double-wishbone rear suspension, improved further with a stabilizer bar mounted directly to the body at the rear and an electric rack and pinion steering setup in front. It all rolls on 18-inch silver five-spoke alloys shod with 245/60 all-seasons in the Ascent’s two lower trims, and 20-inch machine-finished high-gloss split-spoke rims on 245/50 rubber for the two upper trims, my test model benefiting from the latter. 

High-speed stability is important with an SUV that moves off the line as quickly as the Ascent. Its horizontally opposed 2.4-litre turbocharged four-cylinder makes 260 horsepower and 277 lb-ft of torque, the latter from 2,000 to 4,800 rpm, but I enjoyed it best when not pushing too hard, which bought out the powertrain’s wonderfully smooth character and minimized fuel usage. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
Most Subaru buyers probably won’t care that a fully digital gauge cluster isn’t on the menu. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Subaru estimates a Transport Canada five-cycle fuel economy rating of 11.6 L/100km city, 9.0 highway and 10.4 combined for the Ascent, compared to 12.0 city, 8.7 highway and 10.5 combined for the larger 3.6-litre H-6 in the much smaller Outback. The new four actually makes 4 more horsepower and 30 additional lb-ft of torque than the flat-six, by the way, so we’ll probably be seeing this smaller, more efficient turbocharged motor in a future Outback too. 

Now that we’re making fuel economy comparisons, the Ascent looks good when put up against the base Explorer’s 2.3-litre turbocharged four that can only manage a claimed 13.1 L/100km in the city, 9.2 on the highway and 11.4 combined, but it should be said the blue-oval SUV makes a lot more power, whereas the thriftiest Toyota Highlander V6 AWD actually does quite well against both the Ford and Subaru SUVs at 11.7 city, 8.8 highway and 10.4 combined. All in all, the Ascent can hold its own at the pump. 

Helping the Ascent achieve its impressive efficiency is Subaru’s High-torque Lineartronic CVT, continuously variable transmissions not only economical but also ideal for this type of large family-oriented vehicle thanks to its smooth, linear power delivery. Subaru includes standard steering wheel paddles to enhance driver engagement, along with a faux eight-speed manual shift mode that does a decent job of faking a regular automatic transmission’s gear changes while providing reasonably sporty driving characteristics, while standard Active Torque Vectoring increases high-speed traction. This advanced CVT was first introduced with Subaru’s WRX sport sedan, and while not optimized to swap cogs as quickly as in the World Rally Championship-bred performance car, it nevertheless combines positive, smooth operation while minimizing running costs. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
This multi-information display sits atop the dash. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Compared to most of the Ascent’s mid-size competitors that come standard with FWD, AWD is standard and there’s only one powertrain on offer, from the base model to top-of-the-line. Trims in mind, the 2019 Ascent is available in Convenience, Touring, Limited and Premier grades, with its standard Convenience features including auto on/off halogen headlamps, LED daytime running lights (DRL), roof rails, a 4.2-inch colour TFT multi-information display, tri-zone auto HVAC, a 6.5-inch touchscreen infotainment system with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone connectivity, a backup camera, a six-speaker audio system with satellite radio, three-way heatable front seats, an eight-way powered driver’s seat, USB ports for the second row, 19 cup and bottle holders, plus more for only $35,995 plus destination. 

Also impressive, all 2019 Ascent trims includes standard Subaru EyeSight driver assist technologies like adaptive cruise control with lead vehicle start assist, pre-collision braking, pre-collision brake assist, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure warning, lane sway warning, and lane keeping assist, while all the expected active and passive safety features come standard as well. 

Moving up through the line, second-rung Touring trim starts at $40,995 in its eight-passenger configuration or $41,495 when the second-row captain’s chairs are added, the latter reducing the total number of seats to seven. The Touring model also includes the Subaru Rear/Side Vehicle Detection (SRVD) system that features blind spot detection, lane change assist, rear cross-traffic alert and reverse automatic braking, plus this trim also includes a special set of machine-finished five-spoke 18-inch alloy wheels, body-coloured side mirrors with integrated LED turn signals and approach lights, LED fog lights, a sportier looking rear bumper design featuring integrated tailpipe cutouts, proximity-sensing keyless entry, pushbutton start/stop, front door courtesy lamps, chromed inner door handles, a universal garage door opener, a windshield wiper de-icer, auto-dimming centre and sideview mirrors, a leather-clad steering wheel and shift knob, a bigger 8.0-inch centre touchscreen, more upscale fabric upholstery, a power panoramic sunroof, magazine pockets on the front seatbacks, climate controls for the second row passengers, reading lights for third row passengers, a retractable cargo cover, a power-operated tailgate, a transmission oil cooler, trailer stability control, and pre-wiring for a trailer hitch that increases towing capability to 2,270 kilos (5,000 lbs). 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
You’ll likely be impressed with the infotainment touchscreen. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Next on the Ascent’s trim menu is the Limited, which starts at $46,495 in its standard eight-passenger configuration or $46,995 when set up for seven passengers, and adds the larger 20-inch alloy wheels noted before, plus steering-responsive full low/high beam LED headlamps with auto high beams, black and ivory soft-touch interior surfaces, a heated steering wheel rim, a nicer looking primary gauge package with chrome bezels and blue needles (instead of red), plus a 6.3-inch colour multifunction display on top of the centre dash that shows the time, temperature and dynamic functions including an inclinometer, while a navigation system gets added to the infotainment display, as does SiriusXM Traffic. Additional Limited trim features include 14-speaker 792-watt Harman/Kardon audio, a 10-way powered driver’s seat enhanced with powered lumbar support and lower cushion length adjustability, driver’s seat and side-mirror memory, a four-way powered front passenger seat, leather upholstery, two-way heated second-row seats, integrated rear door sunshades, third-row USB ports, plus more. 

My tester’s Premier trim is top of the line yet at $49,995 it’s still very affordable, especially within a class that often exceeds the $50k threshold before adding options. The Ascent Premier comes fully equipped as is, including a special high-gloss black grille insert, satin-finish side mirror housings, chromed exterior door handles, rain-sensing windshield wipers, ambient interior lighting, a front-view camera, a Smart Rearview Mirror with an integrated rearview camera, woodgrain inlays, brown perforated leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, standard captain’s chairs for the second row, a 120-volt power outlet on the rear centre console, plus more. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
Comfort is king in the Ascent’s accommodating driver’s seat. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

By the way, all 2019 Subaru Ascent prices were sourced right here on CarCostCanada, where you can also find detailed pricing on trims, packages and standalone options for every other new car, truck, van and crossover SUV sold in Canada, plus rebate information and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

Along with all the right features is a really nicely finished cabin that’s large and comfortable from front to back. Some noteworthy details include a leather-like soft-touch dash top enhanced with attractive stitching ahead of the front passenger, while just below is a useful shelf unpinned by a really nice bolster covered in more stitched leatherette, albeit ivory coloured for a truly distinct look. This wraps around lower portion of the instrument panel before matching up to more ivory bolstering on the door panels, although Subaru goes a step further by introducing a dark brown for the armrests that matches the previously noted brown leather seat upholstery. Premier trim also features matte-finish faux wood trim, but honestly it doesn’t come close to looking or feeling real. Last but not least, Subaru takes care of everyone’s elbows with soft padded synthetic door uppers front to back, but doesn’t go so far as to wrap any of the roof pillars in cloth like some others in the class. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
Second-row roominess is excellent. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Speaking of not measuring up to the best this class has to offer, I was surprised to learn this top-line model doesn’t come with a fully digital gauge cluster, this advanced feature showing up on many of the Ascent’s recently redesigned or new competitors, like Volkswagen’s Atlas and Hyundai Palisade. Still, the dials’ blue needles were a nice addition instead of the usual red found in lower trims, while the vertical TFT multi-information display features a cool graphic of the SUV’s backside with taillights that light up when pressing the brake. It’s fun to watch, but even better this display notifies drivers via visual alert and audio chime that they may have left something, a young child, or possibly a pet in the back seat. 

The bigger multi-information display on top of the dash is used more for Subaru’s EyeSight advanced driver assistance systems, with attractive, detailed graphics, while this display also provides speed limit information, navigation system info, an inclinometer and other off-road features, plus more. 

Just underneath, Subaru’s impressive new high-resolution 3D-like infotainment touchscreen really wows the eyes as it provides a bevy of useful functions. It includes all the features and apps noted earlier, plus it responds to inputs quickly and reliably. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
Even the third row is roomy enough for adults. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Fast responses in mind, the heatable steering wheel warms up quickly and remains hot as well, as do the heated front and rear seats, which I appreciate more than those that slowly cool off after a few minutes of maximum strength. I often use heated seats for therapeutic reasons, soothing an aching lower back, and the last thing I want is to keep fiddling with a temperature control switch. Speaking of switches, the button for heated steering wheel is smartly positioned just below the right-side spoke where it’s easy to locate, while the adaptive cruise control system, actuated via a set of buttons just above, worked ideally during high-speed and stop-and-go driving. Likewise, the lane departure system held the Ascent in place when cruising down the freeway, but rather than maintain the centre of a given lane it bounced off the lines when I purposely didn’t pay attention in order to test its capability. 

A really impressive technology is the Ascent Premier’s auto-dimming centre mirror that does double-duty as a backup camera when activated. Also helpful is the Ascent’s sunglasses holder that doubles as a rear conversation mirror. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
There’s plenty of space for cargo with all the seats folded down. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Ascent’s driver’s seat was ultra-comfortable and quite wide, so it should be ideally shaped for big people, but it fit my five-foot-eight medium-build body type well too. When that front seat was positioned for my long-legged, short-torso frame, which means I had it pushed farther rearward than someone my height normally would, a far reaching telescopic steering wheel allowed for a comfortable driving position that left me in complete control. What’s more, when the seat was set up this way I still had plenty of room just behind in the second row seat, with approximately 10 inches of available space ahead of my knees and ample for me feet, plus loads for my hips and shoulders as well as more than enough over my head. 

I was even more impressive with the third row. Just for fun I slid the second row as far back as possible and then climbed rearward, via a walkway that provided more than enough room. When seated in the very back my knees were rubbing up against the second-row seatbacks, but moving those seats forward a touch remedied the situation to the point that I had plenty of space in both rear rows. Really, there were three-plus inches above my head in the very back, which means average-size adults should fit in no problem, even while larger adults are seated just ahead. 

2019 Subaru Ascent Premier
The retractable cargo cover neatly stows away under the cargo floor. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As I mentioned before, the Ascent provides a full load of cargo space behind the third row. In fact, it’s similar that found in a full-size sedan’s trunk, while below that load floor is a hidden compartment for storing smaller items plus the retractable cargo cover when not being used. Lowering the 60/40-split third row is slightly awkward, first needing the headrests to be manually pushed down into the seatbacks, and then requiring a tug on a strap hanging off the top of the seats, before pushing those seats down. Pulling them back up merely needs a tug on a longer strap attached to the cargo floor/seatback. As for the second row, it lays down by first unlatching it, so you can slide it forward, and then unlatching a second release at which point you can slide them back if you want to line up each side. There’s plenty of space for luggage and/or building sheets, but I must say the captain’s chairs don’t result in a particularly flat loading area. I imagine the standard bench seat would work better, so you may want to purchase one of the Ascent’s lower trims if you’re planning to do a lot of load hauling. 

Purchasing in mind, you should feel safe buying an Ascent, even though it hasn’t been around very long. Subaru has a good track record for reliability and longevity, and after a week with this example I believe the automaker has done a very good job engineering and assembling its first-ever near full-size SUV. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
We tested the 2019 Equinox in two flavours, including its base 1.5-litre turbo-four (shown here) and its 1.6-litre turbo-diesel. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s easy to point the finger at Volkswagen for ridding us of the diesel, but they weren’t the only German automaker to cheat environmental regulations in order to legitimize their oil burners. Now we can thank General Motors for staying the diesel engine’s execution, at least temporarily. 

Yes, no sooner am I reporting on the General’s wonderful 1.6-litre turbo-diesel powerplant and it’s already being discontinued from the 2020 Equinox lineup, relegated back to mid-size pickup truck duty. This means you’d better act fast if you want to own a new 2019 Equinox Diesel. 

You may not know that Hyundai and Mazda promised diesel powertrains of their own for this very 2019 model year, but they’ve probably seen the fading light of diesel’s demise in this new “woke” era, with Hyundai recently introducing a number of all-electric SUVs, one even fueled with hydrogen. Trying to refuel that fuel cell model at Vancouver’s only hydrogen station might pose a problem unless you happen to live five minutes away like I do, but I’d still rather have the go-anywhere efficiency of a diesel. 

Recently I spent a week with 1.5-litre turbo-four gasoline-powered Equinox Premium (the white one in the photos), and after that another week with the same trim with the turbo-diesel I’ve been blabbing on about (the blue version), while I’ve yet to spend a minute with the most compact crossover SUV’s most potent 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
Is blue more your style? The Equinox provides plenty of colour options, not to mention loads of trims and even three engines. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The entry-level engine might initially appear a bit on the weak side thanks to only 170 horsepower and 203 lb-ft of torque available, at least on paper, but it was more than sufficient for this fairly lightweight compact crossover, plus it’s ultra friendly to those keeping tabs on their budgets due to a claimed Transport Canada fuel economy rating of 9.2 L/100km city, 7.3 highway and 8.3 combined in FWD trim, or 9.3 city, 7.8 highway and 8.6 combined with its optional AWD. 

The available 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder, which features AWD as standard equipment, should provide those looking for excitement with thrills aplenty thanks to 252 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque, but despite the impressive nine-speed automatic it comes mated to, which adds up to three extra gears over the two less potent engines’ six-speed automatic transmissions, the more advanced drivetrain manages only 10.9 L/100km in the city, 8.3 on the highway and 9.7 combined. 

Incidentally, all models come standard with auto stop/start, which instantly turns off the engine when the Equinox comes to a full stop, and then automatically restarts it when lifting off the brake pedal, the process helping reduce emissions and fuel usage. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
It’s a smart looking SUV, no matter the trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All in all, the above numbers are really quite decent when comparing them to competitors with similar performance, but both gasoline-fueled models don’t come close to matching the fuel economy of the Equinox Diesel, that gets an 8.5 L/100km city, 6.0 highway (6.1 with AWD) and 7.4 combined claimed rating. Then again, line those numbers up next to the new Toyota RAV4 Hybrid’s figures and the Chevy almost looks gluttonous, what with a mere 5.8 L/100km of city consumption, plus 6.3 on the highway and 6.0 combined, plus the Japanese model’s $32,090 entry price is about a thousand cheaper than the least expensive Equinox LT FWD model, which starts at $33,100. It’s $6,400 more than the $26,700 base Equinox LS as well, and $5,300 less than the $38,400 Equinox AWD Premier Diesel shown on this page. All-wheel drive adds $2,400 to the base LS price, incidentally, while the sportier Equinox AWD 2.0 Premier is available from $37,900. 

I should mention that all the quoted prices above don’t include the destination charge or any other fees, but you can check such details plus all the prices of trims, packages and individual options right here on CarCostCanada, where we also provide you the latest manufacturer rebates (especially helpful during year-end clear-outs) as well as dealer invoice pricing that could easily save you thousands. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
LED headlights and taillights are available, plus these optional 19-inch alloys. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Now that we’re talking savings, Mitsubishi’s Outlander PHEV is the compact SUV class’s most efficient model by a long shot, but with a base price of $43,498 (before government rebates) it’s a lot more expensive, which makes GM’s duo of diesels the most efficient non-electrified crossover pairing in the compact crowd. Combine that with diesel pump pricing that’s usually a lot lower than regular unleaded, and it should save you money if you drive enough. It should be noted the 2.0-litre turbo is thriftier than a number of similarly powerful compact crossovers too, so big marks to GM for offering so many engine and transmission options, plus making them all better than average when it comes to fuel economy. 

I have to admit to preferring the diesel-turbo to the base gasoline-powered turbo-four, both from a performance and efficiency perspective. The diesel might only put out 137 horsepower, but it delivers a much stronger 240 lb-ft of torque down, and like the base engine it’s all available from just 2,000 rpm. 

Also impressive, the Equinox’ AWD system aids fuel economy even more. Unlike the majority of SUVs in this class that use full-time AWD systems, or employ a viscous-type coupling that causes the rear wheels to engage automatically, GM’s SUVs use the front wheels to drive until traction becomes a problem, at which point a warning appears within the instrument cluster and you’re recommended to switch over to AWD by pressing a button on the lower centre console. I first questioned whether or not my Equinox was fitted with AWD when my front tires kept breaking traction during takeoff, this due to all of the diesel’s rubber-smoking torque, but after noticing the AWD button and then putting it into action, no more squealing tires. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
The interior is really refined, and there’s no shortage of standard and available features. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Another bonus was the base six-speed automatic, which while down a couple of gears from some others in this class, including the aforementioned 2.0-litre turbo-four, was nevertheless very responsive. You can even row through the gears by flicking a rocker switch on top of the shift knob with your thumb, which is an unusual but welcome alternative to shifting the whole gear lever or pulling on a set of steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters (now that I mentioned that, don’t try to shift by pulling the buttons on the backside of the Equinox’ steering wheel, as you’ll probably just swap radio stations). Back to that six-speed, I never found it lacking gears, as each engine provided plenty of torque over very wide rev ranges, and the transmission shifted nice and smooth no matter whether I was doing so manually or leaving it to its own devices. 

The Equinox also has a nice smooth suspension, which is par for the course when talking about GM products, other than performance-first models like the Corvette Z06. Back to the compact crossover SUV segment, the Equinox takes to corners well too, easily providing a level of smile-inducing sporty performance. It feels light in weight, nimble, and plenty of fun through the curves, plus it’s great at zipping in and out of heavy inner-city traffic, or just cruising down the freeway. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
The centre stack is well laid out, and infotainment touchscreen amongst the segment’s best. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I was able to take in the Equinox Premier’s impressive interior better during more relaxed stints behind the wheel, however. It’s finished to a higher degree than some of its key rivals, a quality factor that immediately becomes noticeable when closing the driver’s door. It just feels more solid and better built than a number of its tinnier challengers, with this refinement continuing throughout the cabin. For instance, both smooth and perforated patterned and contrast-stitched leatherette covers the entire instrument panel, while tastefully applied aluminum-like accents dress up the steering wheel, the primary gauge cluster, each dash vent, the centre stack switchgear, and the lower console controls. 

A weakness is the amount of pliable interior plastics, but Chevy does cover each armrest plus much of the door inserts and uppers in a padded, contrast-stitched leatherette, while it finishes off the rest of those door uppers in a synthetic soft paint that also is used for dressing up the dash top and much of the instrument panel, plus the top edges of the centre stack and lower console. To clarify, this isn’t the type of paint that eventually peels off, but instead it is permanently bonded to the plastic and therefore provides a nicer texture than the usual hard shell plastic found in this class. 

Pushing such premium touches yet further upstream is a truly nice set of steering wheel switchgear, my test model even featuring a heated steering wheel rim as well as adaptive cruise control, while some of the buttons at hand actuated the colour multi-information display in the otherwise analogue gauge package, this incorporating a digital readout for traffic sign info, plus a back seat reminder that detects whether or not you opened the rear doors before departing on your journey, and when arriving warns that something or someone might have been left in the rear passenger compartment. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
This best-in-industry parking camera lets you watch the curb and road simultaneously, plus much more. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Lastly, the Equinox tops off its centre stack with a truly impressive infotainment touchscreen. I really like the clear and elegantly simple circular graphics and bright colours used for the main menu interface, which look modern, fresh and are easy to sort out. Chevy has created one of the best infotainment systems in the mainstream industry, and while some competitors might offer larger touchscreens, this eight-inch system is brilliantly sharp thanks to excellent resolution, and provides deep, rich colours with superb contrast. The navigation system’s map is clear and easy to read, while inputting addresses is easy, plus the route guidance was totally accurate each time I used it. I only wish the satellite radio interface showed album cover graphics, but that was hardly a deal-breaker. 

The Equinox infotainment system also includes Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration, plus one of the best 360-degree parking monitors I’ve ever experienced. From its default mode, which makes the “bird’s-eye” view surround camera smaller and puts it to the left of the display with a bigger rearview camera along with its dynamic guidelines to the right, it can be switched up to a full reverse camera with dynamic guidelines, or instead provide a different view of that same backup camera, an overhead view of that rear camera, or alternatively a weird frontal view that actually seems as if the SUV is being filmed from a drone hovering slightly ahead and above. There are simultaneous views of the curb and road, ultra-close-ups of the front, plus more. This camera kept me spellbound for at least an hour. By the way, both this top-tier camera system and the entry-level version were upgraded for image quality this year. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
Great seats and a superb driving position made for a comfortable daily driver. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Just below the infotainment display is a two-zone auto HVAC interface that’s nicely organized and attractive, but my favourite set of buttons activated the three-way heatable and/or cooled front seats, the second of these items rarely available in this category, but really appreciated for keeping backside dry and cool during summer’s heat. 

Follow the centre stack down to its base and you’ll find a sizeable compartment with a rubberized floor that’s ideal for a big smartphone. Chevy included a wireless charging pad, always convenient, plus the Equinox went from one regular USB-A port to a set of USBs, one for the usual A plug and another for new USB-C connectors, which is what my Samsung S9 uses. An aux plug and 12-volt charger come standard as well, while two additional USB charging ports can be found in a bin under the front centre armrest. 

Glance upward and you’ll find an overhead console housing a sunglasses holder, LED reading lights, plus controls for OnStar, SOS, etcetera, plus of course switchgear for the panoramic sunroof and its powered sunshade. I love big glass roofs like this, because they shed plenty of light inside, brightening the entire vehicle’s ambience. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
Now that’s a nice sunroof! (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of course, none of this would matter if the Equinox wasn’t comfortable, and to that end it provided plenty of room for my medium-build five-foot-eight body, as well as an excellent driving position that gave me total support and kept me in full control. Such isn’t always the case. In fact, some rivals’ tilt and telescopic steering won’t reach far enough rearward to compensate for my need to pull the driver’s seat far enough rearward for my longer than average legs (for a five-foot-eight person at least). 

What’s more, when my driver’s seat was set up for my long-legged short torso body type, I still had about eight inches of room for my knees when sitting behind in the second row, and plenty of space from side to side plus about two inches over my head. The panoramic sunroof noted a moment ago pushed the surrounding roof area down a couple of inches than it would have if not included, but not a problem for me. 

As far as rear seat features go, the Equinox Premier gets a set of LED reading lights on both sides, two additional USB-A charging ports (new for 2019), a regular household-style three-prong 120-volt socket, and the best rear seat heaters I’ve ever tried out, in that their three-way controls adjust the lower cushion and the backrest temperatures, or just the back alone. I don’t think you’ll hear a lot of complaints from the kiddos, but being that the rear seatbacks are divided 60/40 with no centre pass-through, active families that ski will be forced to play rock, paper, scissors for the heated side. 

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
Plenty of room back here. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I like that Chevy incorporates levers on the cargo wall for folding those rear seatbacks down automatically. Just pull on them once and the seats drop down quickly, expanding the already sizeable 847-litre (29.9 cu-ft) dedicated cargo area to a really big 1,809 litres (63.9 cu ft). 

Being just a year into its lifecycle, the 2019 Equinox looks identical to the 2018 model, but nevertheless GM has put a great deal of effort into rejigging trims and packages. To begin, a new Lights and Bright package is available with the second-rung LT, adding a chromed grille surround, LED headlights and tail lamps, as well as a special set of 19-inch alloys. Front-drive LT models no longer include a standard leather-clad shift knob, however, but it’s now part of an upgrade package. 

My test model did feature a $2,995 Driver Confidence and Convenience II package, mind you, which is exclusive to Premier trim and includes the 360-degree parking monitor mentioned before, plus auto high beams, dynamic cruise control with stop-and-go, autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane keeping assist, a safety alert seat that vibrates when veering out of your lane or causing any other number of issues, a heated steering wheel, an eight-way powered front passenger seat with power lumbar, and the cooled driver and front passenger seats, plus the heatable rear seats mentioned earlier. 

You can also get the Driver Confidence II or Driver Convenience II packages separately, while my tester wore a no-cost set of 19-inch five-spoke alloy wheels. I won’t go into detail about all the options available, but suffice to say that anyone wanting to personalize their Equinox won’t have a problem.  

2019 Chevrolet Equinox AWD Premier Road Test
Cargo? Not a problem. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

On that note my test model included a $1,305 Infotainment II package as well, featuring the aforementioned panoramic sunroof, a navigation system, a seven-speaker Bose audio system, HD radio, and a different set of 19-inch alloys, while some Premier trim highlights include LED headlamps and taillights, chromed door handles and mirror housings, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and auto-dimming outside mirrors, a leather-clad steering wheel rim, a colour multi-information display, a universal garage door opener, two-zone auto climate control, an 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen (the base model gets a 7.0-inch display), wireless smartphone charging, rear parking assist, blind spot warning with rear cross-traffic alert, a hands-free power tailgate, and more. 

If you’re not convinced the Equinox is worthy of your attention by now, you’ve already made up your mind on something else. If you’re still on the fence, however, or just starting to search, make sure to include this impressive compact crossover SUV on your list. Just remember, however, that the diesel option will be cancelled soon, so claim yours if you like the idea of driving seriously far on a single tank of fuel. No matter the engine the Equinox is a good choice. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay