Buying a new Tesla model? Get the best possible deal with a customized price report| Tesla dealer invoice price Canada

Thinking of buying a new Tesla Canada model? Well, most car buyers undoubtedly look for the best deals before buying a vehicle. When it comes to taking ownership of an expensive car, it’s always important to get price guidance and buying advice from a car pricing expert. It helps you to discover factory rebates and hidden incentives. 

Tesla is known for it’s high-quality and affordable vehicles and selecting a suitable model that matches your forte is a tough task. You can get the best Tesla dealer invoice price in Canada from CarCostCanada. Never overpay for your Tesla when you can get the best price in the market. 

Here’s what you need to know while selecting a Tesla Canada Model:

Tesla models are hot picks right now and one of the best takeaways is that they don’t require gas. Above all, there are several reasons to invest in a stylish and convenient Tesla vehicle. 

Let’s explore the three most popular Tesla models! 

Model 3

Now, the standard model 3 is available in Canada with a range of 220 miles and a peak speed of 130 mph to 0-60 mph acceleration of 5.6 seconds.

  • The base model rage is $47,600 CAD/ $35,000 USD
  • Premium interior features 
  • It has space for 5 adults
  • There are two trunks both at the front and back
  • Drives about 345 kilometres per charge 

Model S

Tesla’s all-electric model S is one of the best selling cars and the 100-kWh battery provides it with excellent acceleration. 

  • The standard range starts with $102,890 CAD 
  • Top speed 250km/h
  • One motor in the front and one in the rear digitally monitors the rear wheels
  • Up to 5 people can fit inside this model
  • An expensive 17” touchscreen in the fronts provides an amazing visual experience

Model X

The 2020 Tesla model X is considered to be one of the fastest cars from the brand with a driving range over 300 miles. 

  • The base cost $110,890 CAD
  • Maximum speed range recorded is 475 kilometres 
  • There’s room for up to 7 people 
  • One of the remarkable features is its gull-wing doors
  • Dual electric motors 

You must be thinking which model is suitable for you and how to get the best price options? Well, when it comes to buying your new Tesla, it’s always better to be prepared with some negotiation tactics before facing the car dealer. 

Don’t do it alone, consult a car pricing expert!

Buying your car alone is not the solution. Your first goal should be arranging a dealer invoice price report from a trusted car pricing expert and then choose a suitable model. Having a dealer invoice report helps you to get the best deal. 

Your free membership with CarCostCanada includes price reports, factory rebates & hidden incentives, price guidance, dealer referrals and trade-in-valuations. Get the best pricing formula to cut down extra dealer cost and applicable incentives. Sign up for your free pricing report today!

Subaru plans a 100-percent electric lineup within 15 years

2020 Subaru Crosstrek
The Crosstrek will likely to be first to adopt Subaru’s upcoming hybrid drivetrain, as it already has a built-in ownership base ready to trade up.

With the current U.S. administration loosening new vehicle emissions restrictions, it might not seem prudent to announce an all-electric vehicle strategy, but the European Union, China and many other markets are tightening emissions regulations, with respect to vehicles at least. Europe will soon be warming its homes and powering businesses with new fossil fuel pipelines from Russia, while China seems to be building coal-fired electric power plants (to no doubt fuel such electric cars) faster than anyone can keep count.

This said it only makes sense that Subaru would want to continue selling into these markets once internal combustion engines (ICE) are no longer allowed, thus it’s planning to soon offer battery power to its lineup, with the eventual result being 100-percent electric.

2020 Subaru Crosstrek
A Forester hybrid would be ideal to go up against Toyota’s popular RAV4 Hybrid.

The electrification process will start off with a new hybrid-electric drivetrain with motive electric components sourced from Toyota, which holds 16.5-percent of Fuji Heavy Industries (FHI) stock (Subaru’s parent company). The 2014-2016 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid was the first hybrid-electric project the two automakers undertook, but with few buyers it was cancelled after just three years.

A move to hybrids and then electric powertrains is a risky move for any automaker, with the risk even greater for small, niche brands like Subaru. The quirky brand has made a name for practical yet fun-to-drive cars and crossover SUVs powered by its unorthodox horizontally opposed “boxer” engine. While other brands like Volkswagen, with its Type 1 Beetle, Type 2 van, Type 3 and 4 sedan/coupe/wagon, and Type 14/Type 34 Karmann Ghia, or Porsche with its 911/912, 914 and 718 models, and even Ferrari with its 1973-1976 Berlinetta Boxer, 1976-1984 BB 512, 1984-1991 Testarossa, 1991-1994 512 TR and 1994-1996 F512 M), have offered this unique engine type as well, the Italian supercar maker and VW no longer do, while Porsche only provides it in its sports car range which makes up much fewer sales than its sedan and SUV lineup.

2020 Subaru Ascent
The Ascent could use a boost of electrified power.

Speaking of model lineups, the best-selling Subaru in Canada last year was the Crosstrek subcompact crossover SUV at 15,184 units, followed by the Forester compact SUV with 13,059 deliveries, the Outback mid-size five-passenger crossover with 10,972 new sales, the Impreza compact sedan and hatchback with 9,065 new buyers, the Ascent mid-size seven-passenger crossover SUV with 4,139 new sales, the WRX/STI performance sedan with 2,707 new customers, the Legacy mid-size sedan at 1,752 clients, and the BRZ compact sports coupe with 647 new sales last year. To find out more about these cars and crossover SUVs, including their trim, package and individual option pricing, plus available rebate information, financing/leasing promotions, and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands, click directly on their names.

2020 Subaru Impreza
Would an Impreza Hybrid b a good competitor for Honda’s Insight or Toyota’s new Corolla Hybrid?

All of the unique models just mentioned makes it clear that retaining as much of its distinctive brand character as possible while moving into the brave new world of automotive electrification is important for Subaru, yet the horizontally opposed engine configuration will eventually have to go if it’s plans for full electrification materialize. Fortunately all-wheel drive (AWD being standard with most of its models) can stay for both its future hybrid and electric cars and SUVs.

The short-lived Crosstrek Hybrid came standard with AWD, while incorporating Toyota’s hybrid technologies and Subaru’s 2.0-litre boxer engine. This allowed it to perform and sound like other Subaru models, keeping its brand identity intact. Subaru doesn’t want badge-engineered cars in its lineup, such as the Toyota/Subaru co-developed Subaru BRZ/Scion FR-S/Toyota 86, or for that matter the Yaris Sedan that was merely a Mazda2 with a Toyota front fascia and Toyota badging. Doing something similar with such a niche automaker would run the risk of diluting its hard-won brand image.

2020 Subaru Outback
An electrified Outback sounds perfect for its market base, especially if it can be plugged in.

“Although we’re using Toyota technology, we want to make hybrids that are distinctly Subaru,” commented the brand’s chief technology officer, Tetsuo Onuki, to Reuters news agency. “It’s not only about reducing CO2 emissions. We need to further improve vehicle safety and the performance of our all-wheel drive.”

While Onuki-san was clear to point out that all-wheel drive would continue as a key Subaru character trait while it adapted to hybrid and electric technologies, AWD is becoming more common with its main rivals. Nissan and Mazda recently introduced redesigned passenger cars with optional AWD (the Mazda3 now providing an AWD alternative to Subaru’s Impreza, while Nissan’s Altima now makes AWD standard in Canada and therefore becomes a key rival to Subaru’s mid-size Legacy), and even though Subaru’s trademarked “Symmetrical AWD” is believed to be more capable in inclement conditions than challengers’ AWD systems, it’s not known if its even power delivery can be achieved effectively with an electric powertrain. What’s more, AWD often comes standard with electric vehicles, so it’s quite likely the AWD traction advantage Subaru cars currently enjoy won’t be unique in 15 years, making the Japanese automaker no more unique than any other brand.

2020 Subaru WRX
How would a hybridized WRX perform? Or how about a purely electric WRX STI?

On the subject of electric vehicles, Subaru and Toyota are in the process of co-developing an electric powertrain that will result in an electric vehicle per brand sometime this decade, with additional models to follow. Subaru is saying that hybrid and fully electric models will make up 40 percent or more of its annual worldwide production by 2030, with the hybrids no longer available five or so years after that.

In today’s fast-paced world, particularly in the automotive sector, 2030 is a long way off, and of course a lot can happen with respect to battery development, advancements in other alternative fuels, progress with car/ride sharing, etcetera, as well as geopolitical concerns that are completely out of an automaker’s influence (much of which can be negative), so changes to Subaru’s plans will be more than likely.

2020 Subaru BRZ
Will there still be a BRZ around in 10 to 15 years? We hope so, or something even more exciting.

This said, the positive for Subaru is its ability to garner green accolades right now without having to take much initial action, which can make its customers feel as if their chosen brand is well on its way toward electrification, yet the ultimate target is so far off into the future that its long-term plans can be changed anytime along the way. Of course, some new hybrid models are likely within the next few years, plus at least one EV, so there is forward progress being made. 

It should be noted that Subaru isn’t alone in making such long-term electrification plans, with GM having pitched a U.S. national environmental program in 2018 designed to motivate all carmakers to make at least 25 percent of their lineups into zero-emissions vehicles; Ford introducing $11.5 billion worth of new spending toward a dozen new hybrid and EV models by 2022; Toyota, as part of its Environmental Challenge 2050 program, pledging to lower vehicle life-cycle emissions by 25 percent plus by 2030, while targeting 2050 for eliminating 100-percent of their carbon emissions; Mercedes-Benz vowing to make at least half of its passenger car lineup electric by 2030, plus achieve full carbon neutrality within the next two decades.

2020 Subaru Outback
Subaru may want to change up its Outback media photos if it’s planning an electrified version, as high-voltage and water don’t mix well.

Volvo may be vying to become the world’s greenest automaker, however, due to its commitment for half of its passenger cars to become electric by 2025, plus also make sure each cars’ life-cycle carbon footprint is reduced by 40 percent in five years time as well. It also wants the carbon output of its entire global operations (including suppliers) to be lowered by 25 percent by 2025, and finally has a plan to use a minimum of 25-percent recycled materials in its vehicle production by this very same year.

While Subaru’s plans aren’t quite as ambitious as Volvo’s, the Japanese automaker’s announcement marks a major step for such a niche automaker, and could be seen as a significant risk if electric vehicle take rates don’t improve enough to overcome investment costs.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Subaru

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR Road Test

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The Jaguar F-Pace SVR looks as good as it drives.

My gawd this thing is nuts! The power, the insane sound of the supercharged V8’s sport exhaust system, and the near overwhelming sensation of 550 horsepower and 502 lb-ft of torque pressing head and backside into the opulent red and black diamond-pattern leather-upholstered driver’s seat at launch while fingers grasp at the leather-wrapped sport steering wheel rim, there’s really nothing that completely mirrors it in the compact luxury SUV segment.

With a flagship sport utility like the F-Pace SVR you’d think this SUV would be tops in its hotly contested class, and while it’s certainly the best selling model within Jaguar’s range it appears luxury buyers are more interested in being comforted than having their senses wowed by ultimate performance. Truly, F-Pace and most Jaguar models deserve more attention than they get.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
Plenty of functional aero add-ons give the SVR a uniquely powerful appearance.

For starters, the F-Pace is inarguably attractive no matter which trim we’re talking about, with this SVR amongst the best looking in its category. There’s no crossover SUV I find more attractive, unless the outrageous Lamborghini Urus enters the discussion, or for that matter Audi’s Q8 that shares much of its running gear, but the ultimate Italian, at least, hovers up in a totally different pricing stratosphere with a base price of $240,569 CAD, compared to a mere $89,900 for this 2019 F-Pace SVR.

The cheapest Q8 will save you $7k and change, but the sporty looking German’s $82,350 entry model merely puts out 335 horsepower, and while a superbly comfortable and wholly attractive, well-made urban and freeway cruiser it’s doesn’t even enter the same performance league as the SVR. The equivalent Q8 is the upcoming near 600-hp RS, but that upcoming model will eventually cost you something around $110,000 (its pricing hadn’t been announced before I wrote these words, and it’s bigger mid-size proportions means it doesn’t directly compete).

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
These black 22-inch alloys are optional, but everything else shown here is standard with the SVR.

Targeted rivals in mind, Audi does offer up the 349-hp SQ5 in the F-Pace’s compact luxury SUV segment, and while a fully capable autobahn stormer, its 5.4-second sprint from zero to 100 km/h can’t line up against the SVR’s 4.3 seconds, and I can attest that its 3.0-litre turbo V6 doesn’t come close to sounding as Mephistophelian as the SVR’s supercharged 5.0-litre V8.

A truer F-Pace SVR competitor is the new Mercedes-AMG GLC 63 4Matic+ that makes 503 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque from a 4.0-litre twin-turbocharged V8 resulting in a blast from standstill to 100km/h in only 3.8 seconds. The Merc tops out at 280 km/h (174 mph) compared to the Jag’s slightly quicker 283 km/h (176 mph) terminal velocity, so they nearly share their two key bragging rights evenly. All you need do if you desire the Mercedes is to add about five percent or $4k onto your purchase, the AMG available just over $93k, unless you end up purchasing the 2020 F-Pace SVR that is, which is now $92k even.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
Plenty of alternative SVR interior colour themes are available if red and black isn’t your thing.

Top-selling German compact luxury SUVs in mind, the BMW X3 M deserves mention too, thanks to 503 horsepower (in the Competition model), 442 lb-ft of torque, and a 4.1-second sprint from standstill to 100 km/h, all from an inline TwinPower turbo six-cylinder. The top-tier Competition model will set you back $93,500 plus fees, while the 473 horsepower base X3 M costs just $83,200.

See all pricing for the 2019 and 2020 F-Pace (or any of the SUVs mentioned) right here at CarCostCanada, including trims, packages and standalone options, while you can also access manufacturer rebate info, plus special deals including factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent (at the time of writing), as well as dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands (there’s up to $3,075 in additional incentives on 2020 models right now) when becoming a member.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The F-Pace SVR provides one rich looking cabin made of very high quality materials.

I haven’t driven the BMW X3 M or the GLC 63 4Matic+, but I’ve driven a lot of six-cylinder BMW Ms and AMG V8s, and while brilliant in their own rights, neither sounds as malevolent as Jaguar’s V8. Sure, the zero to 100km/h numbers are better and their prices aren’t much higher, but performance fans will know how important the auditory experience is to the thrill of high-speed driving. As for measuring the few milliseconds of sprint time differences, that’s downright impossible from the seat of the pants.

Using the Mercedes for comparison, both of these compact luxury SUVs provide nearly identical wheelbases of 2,874 millimetres for the SVR and 2,873 mm for the AMG, while their tracks are nearly the same too, the Jag measuring 1,641 mm up front and 1,654 mm in the rear and the Merc spanning 1,660 mm at both axles, but despite the F-Pace being 52 mm lengthier at 4,731 mm, 79 mm wider (mirrors included) at 2,175 mm, and 42 mm taller at 1,667 mm, plus having 100 litres of extra cargo capacity behind the back seats at 650 litres, it tips the scales 67 kilos lighter at just 1,995 kg. That’s thanks to its mostly aluminum body and chassis over Mercedes’ mix of steels and alloys.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster can be configured in many different layouts.

I can’t move past this point without mentioning two more compact SUVs capable of contending in this ultra-fast compact luxury SUV category, these being the Porsche Macan Turbo and the Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio, the German making 400 or 440 horsepower depending on whether you’re looking at the outgoing 2019 model or the new second-generation 2020 variety, or for that matter choosing the older Macan with its Performance Package upgrade (which also puts out 440-hp). The more potent engine options make this German SUV’s acceleration similar to the F-Pace SVR, yet it’s pricing delves into six figures, while the zippy Italian produces 505 horsepower and sprints to 100 km/h in just 4.0 seconds, while its price starts at $95k. These two SUVs are impressive as well, but once again their turbocharged V6 engines, while brilliant, can’t measure up to the sonorous delights of Jaguar’s big, hairy V8.

Truly, you’ve got to hear it at full song to appreciate what I’m talking about. It’s giggle-inducing joy on one hand and devilish horror on the other, particularly after pressing the exhaust button that provides a freer flow resulting in more snap, crackle and pop from its backside when lifting off the gas pedal.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The updated F-Pace touchscreen is a big improvement over the previous generation.

You’d think with this level of dark, malevolent behaviour its interior would be a hard stone dungeon of dank sombreness, and while some trim pulls thoughts of red hot hellfire, the SVR’s cabin gets raised the level of super SUVs from more exotic names. It’s also capable of loading in the kiddies and lots of family gear, thanks to that aforementioned cargo hauling capacity.

You can also experience some light off-roading, as long as you’re willing to change out my testers optional 22-inch black-painted rims and 265/40 front and 295/35 rear Pirelli Scorpion Zero all-season tires to something more useful off pavement. I’d recommend something around 18 inches in diameter with a higher sidewall and much more tread grip, but then again you’re probably not buying this SUV for scaling the Rubicon trail. No, it’s much more capable of turning winding side roads into straight stretches roadway, or at least its near flat stance at breathtaking speeds makes them feel as if they were straight.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
This performance page is a fun way to keep an eye on the SVR’s power and handling chops.

The F-Pace SVR’s wide track and lighter than average weight (for its length, big powerplant and over-the-top luxury upgrades), plus the just-mentioned Pirelli rubber (you can get even better performance from a set of Jaguar-specified P Zeros, available from tire retailers) and its stiffer aluminum-intensive front strut and rear multi-link suspension featuring sportier tuning to its adaptive setup, plus sharper electric power-steering tuning, all come together for about as much sports car feel as most any SUV can provide (Urus aside).

The SVR shines on the types of narrow, undulating, ribbons of asphalt that the mind conjures up when looking at an F-Type SVR, but I have to say I really appreciated the added ride height this SUV provided over any low-slung sports car when coursing through heavily treed backroads. To be clear, the F-Type remains the Jaguar to beat through winding roads, not to mention road courses, but when visibility around curves or over sharp declines becomes difficult, the extra few inches of added sight line makes for a bit more confidence at high speeds, as does the wheel travel and more compliant suspension of the bigger, heavier SUV. Both SVRs work best when their previously noted Dynamic driving modes are selected, over their more comforting and economical options at least, this more assertive adaptive suspension setup stopping its tall body from pitching and rolling.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The full-leather cabin gets complemented by loads of genuine aluminum and available carbon fibre.

Of course, I didn’t drive it like I stole it during my entire weeklong test, and not just because of the otherworldly fuel cost. Transport Canada estimates a 14.5 L/100km city, with 11.0 highway and 12.7 combined, which not too bad considering its outrageous power. Alfa Romeo’s most formidable Stelvio is rated at 14.1, 10.4 and 12.4 respectively, while the new 2020 Macan Turbo manages 14.2 in the city, 10.1 on the highway and 12.0 combined. How about the Merc-AMG GLC 63? It’s pretty bad at 15.0 L/100km in the city, 10.9 on the highway and 13.2 combined, but BMW’s X3 M is the least fuel conscious amongst all rivals with an embarrassing rating of 16.6 city, 12.1 highway and 14.2 combined, if buyers in this class actually care.

Together with the SVR’s Dynamic sport mode mentioned before, which I kept engaged most of my test week, there’s also a Comfort mode for rougher road surfaces or more relaxing moods, plus an Eco mode, which I likely should have chosen more often for overcoming the fuel economy noted above. The latter two drive modes let the engine turn off when it would otherwise be idling, saving fuel and reducing emissions. The big Eco screen that estimated how much fuel I saved while using its most economical driving mode was a bit humourous in this beast of an SUV, but fortunately the centre display offers up a Performance panel too, which I found much more useful.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The SVR seats are fabulous.

Unlike most in this class, the F-Pace only uses a touchscreen for accessing infotainment, which will put off those who prefer to make commands via a lower console-mounted controller. I like touchscreens so it’s not an issue, and even better Jaguar’s interface has wholly improved in recent years. The display itself is fairly big at just over 10 inches, while the digital interface is divided into three big tiles for navigation/route guidance/maps, media, and phone, or whatever functions you choose as it can be organized for personal preferences. Swipe the display to the left and a second panel with nine smaller tiles shows up, providing access to most any function you could want. It’s a simple, straightforward system and thus user-friendly, with its just-mentioned swipe gesture control accompanied by the usual smartphone/tablet-type tap and pinch capabilities, the latter helpful when using the nav system’s map. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration apps are included too, as are myriad additional features (although you’ll need to pay more for satellite radio), Jaguar’s system being fully up to the class standards.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
A panoramic sunroof is standard.

Better yet, the SVR’s 12.3-inch Interactive Driver Display (a.k.a. digital instrument cluster) is wonderful. It’s fully configurable, with the ability to appear like a classic two-dial primary gauge package, a single driving dial with a numeric speed readout surrounded by a graphical tach at centre with a panel filled with alternative info to each side, while you can also transform the entire cluster into a giant map. Go ahead an configure almost any way you want, while an available head-up display can provide even more key info right on the windshield.

There’s decent device connectivity within a minuscule centre bin, including dual USB-A ports, a Micro SD card slot, plus a 12-volt charger. Why Jaguar didn’t include a wireless charging as part of the rubberized pad ahead of the shifter that fit my Samsung S9 perfectly is anyone’s guess, but such is life. Oddly it’s not even available as an option for 2019 or 2020, so ask your dealer if there’s an aftermarket solution.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
The two rear outboard seats are wonderfully comfortable.

From the quality of electronics to the quality of the F-Pace SVR’s interior materials, not to mention interior quality and style of the five compact luxury SUVs discussed in this review, it’ll come down to personally taste, with all presenting fairly dramatic interior designs packed with better than average materials quality and worthwhile digital screen time. Having spent time with each of these vehicles in lesser trims for weeks apiece, I’d probably give the overall quality nod to Porsche quickly followed by BMW and Mercedes, with Jaguar SUVs seeming to have conceded the ultimate interior mantle to its Land Rover sister brand. The F-Pace is related to the Range Rover Velar, which provides a far more appealing cabin), whereas my Stelvio tester was the only vehicle in 20 years of reviewing cars that’s ever left its ultra-cheap hood release lever in my hand after trying to take a look at the engine (which I unfortunately never saw or photographed due to this bizarre malfunction).

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
This two-way automatic climate control panel on the backside of the front console allows rear outboard passengers to set their own temperatures, plus heat or cool their seats.

The SVR does up the quality of its cabin materials plus its overall sense of occasion when compared to lesser F-Pace trims, especially when the optional black Suedecloth roofliner and pillars get added. Contrast stitched premium leather can be found just about everywhere else, the bottom portion my test model’s dash and centre console, plus its armrests and seat bolsters finished in a rich Pimento red colour, while Ebony Lozenge hides covered most other surfaces, including the quilted leather seat inserts. It’s an eye-catching design, but I personally would want something less red. I loved the carbon-fibre detailing elsewhere, mind you (this being an upgrade over the standard textured Weave aluminum inlays), while plenty of piano black lacquer glitz things up further. Ditto for brushed aluminum trim, the SVR replete with genuine aluminum accents, my favourite bits being seat backrest cutouts front and back.

While some in the super-SUV class only provide space for four, the F-Pace SVR includes a middle seat in back, but I personally wouldn’t want to sit on top of it, as it’s little more than a padded bump between two wonderfully sculpted outboard seats. For those who need somewhere to strap in a smaller child, it could be a dealmaker, but bigger kids and adults alike will be snapping up the window seats first, which provide excellent support all-round. Rear passengers can also benefit from as-tested available quad-zone automatic climate control, featuring its own control panel on the backside of the front console. Included are switches for the rear outboard seats’ three-way heated and ventilated cushions.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR
Skiers will appreciate the F-Pace’s 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks.

Another dealmaker is the rear passenger/cargo configuration, featuring a 40/20/40-split down the seatbacks. This means you wont be forced to stick one child (or friend) on the centre hump when heading to the ski hill, which might end up in some heated arguments when factoring in those just-noted seat warmers. Jaguar also offers cargo wall levers for folding down those seats automatically, but you’ll need to pay a bit extra for them.

I know I’m sounding all practical in a review that should really be more about power and performance, but if you only wanted to go as fast as possible you’d probably be reading one of my F-Type SVR reviews. The F-Pace SVR is a best of all worlds alternative, with one of the best sounding engines currently being made. If you’re wishing our compact SUV looked and felt more like a supercar, Jaguar’s F-Pace SVR might be just the ticket.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

Growing Your Family? Here are the Most Budget-Friendly 2020 Cars | New Car Price Report Canada

Starting the new year off with a new family expansion? You might have to upgrade your car to accommodate the new changes and that can seem daunting. There’s already so much to worry about and now a car too? That’s why we found some of the best 2020 models for families that can accommodate your changing life. 

CarCostCanada is here to give you the best new car price reports in Canada. From a large variety of different models, no matter if you want Kia, Hyundai, Nissan, or Acura, Car Cost Canada is here to help!

 

2020 Kia Telluride

Named one of 2020s top 10 cars by Kelley Blue Book and Motor Trend’s 2020 Car of the Year, this is a serious option you can’t ignore. A 3 row SUV seating up to 8 with seat heating available in the first 2 rows, this Kia is great for a large family, or carpools out to the kids’ practices and classes. 

Everyone knows how much a hassle a large family can be sometimes and Kia did not forget about this issue, even adding in an intercom to the back row letting you stop building up stress shouting over everyone to try to keep control. Satisfying the backseat group there are USB ports for each passenger and even wireless charging, and easy to use one-touch sliding and folding seats to make getting everyone in and out the easiest it can be.

 

2020 Subaru Outback

The newest edition of the Subaru outback is perfect for families looking for the feeling of an off-road truck. With seating for 5 with roomy back seats, this vehicle comes with a lot of up-to-date features to satisfy you and your tech needing children. Including wi-fi hot spot connectivity, and USB ports to charge devices. The outback boasts a remote engine start feature letting you warm up the car from your phone and not miss anything and get the kids ready to go.

Don’t think that’s it though, it comes with many new features to make driving the easier and the most comfortable it can be. Features like Starlink which will alert an operator if there is an accident getting you roadside help, and DriverFocus Distraction Mitigation System sensing if you’re straying from your lane will help you stay on the top of your game even if there is a ruckus in the backseat. Another great feature is Eyesight, which detects objects ahead, telling you how close you are to the car ahead, and reacts fast to unexpected situations; reducing power to the engine to minimize the force and impact when a collision happens.

 

2020 Honda Odyssey

Winner of Kelley Blue Books award “Minivan Best Buy” for three years in a row for a reason, it has everything you’ll need for a growing family. Honda went above and beyond focusing on a family car that can handle any situation you can, seating up to eight and accommodating up to five car seats. It boasts a built-in vacuum that can reach all around the interior of the car and a crevice tool to reach the tiny crumbs in the tightest of spots. There is an interior camera to keep an eye on what the kids are doing, a DVD player with folding 10-inch screen, and rear USB ports and wireless charging pad upfront.

There are features that focus more on you too, along with cruise control and blindspot alerts there is Snow Mode which helps during the cold months adjusting the traction system to give you more control on icy roads. Also, the Odyssey comes with eight standard airbags, making sure to protect your family the best it can with knee airbags, and side-impact curtains covering each row of the vehicle.

 

Excited about your new family but nervous about a new car?

With this list hopefully deciding will be a bit easier, these vehicles are specifically catered to the active lifestyle of a family and being a new parent and using CarCostCanada’s free report system you can make sure to get the best deal on the best newest model for your new family.

Corvette, Telluride and Gladiator win 2020 North American Car, Utility and Truck of the Year

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray
The 2020 Corvette has changed the game for Chevrolet as well as its mainstream and exotic competition.

Trying to guess which car, SUV and pickup will win their respective categories in the annual North American Car, Utility and Truck of the Year awards program can be more difficult some years than others, but most folks that keep their ear to the road had the 2020 lineup of winners picked out long before the big announcement this week.

The true name of the award is North American Car and Truck of the Year (NACTOY), in spite of having a third category covering SUVs added in 2017. The NACTOY awards were first presented in 1994.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray
The new Corvette’s interior looks much more premium-like than its predecessors.

A total of 50 automotive journalists made up the NACTOY jury this year, from print, online, radio and broadcast media in both the U.S. and Canada, with the nine finalists (three per category) presented in the fall and the eventual winners awarded each year at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit. This year’s announcement changed to a separate event at the TCF Center (previously called Cobo Hall/Cobo Center) in Detroit, however, due to the NAIAS rescheduling to June 7-20, 2020.

Notably, each year nominated vehicles need be completely new, totally redesigned, or significantly refreshed, or in other words the vehicle being nominated must be something most buyers would consider entirely new or wholly different from its predecessor. Additionally, each finalist earned its top-three placement via judgment of its segment leadership, innovation, design, safety, handling, driver satisfaction, and dollar value.

2020 Kia Telluride
The 2020 Telluride takes Kia way upscale, making a good impression of a premium SUV.

This year’s selection process began in June of 2019, with vehicle eligibility chosen after three voting rounds. NACTOY chose the independent accounting firm of Deloitte LLP for tallying up all votes and then kept them secret until the organization’s President, Lauren Fix, Vice President, Chris Paukert, and Secretary-Treasurer, Kirk Bell unsealed the envelopes on stage.

Finalists in this year’s “Car” category included Chevrolet’s Corvette, Hyundai’s Sonata and Toyota’s Supra, with the winner being the new seventh-generation mid-engine Corvette, a completely reimagined car that will totally upend the premium sports car segment. Of note, it has been six years since a sports car won the Car category, so hats off to General Motors’ Chevrolet brand and its Corvette team for designing something so sensational that it couldn’t be overlooked, while both Toyota and Hyundai should also be recognized for their superb finalists.

2020 Kia Telluride
Just check out the Telluride’s interior. It’s over the top luxury.

“A mid-engine Corvette was a huge risk for Chevy’s muscle-car icon. They nailed it. Stunning styling, interior, and performance for one-third of the cost of comparable European exotics,” said The Detroit News auto critic Henry Payne.

“Utility Vehicle” finalists were all entirely new to the SUV market, and included the Hyundai Palisade, Kia Telluride and Lincoln Aviator. Most industry commentators seemed to believe that one of the two Hyundai Motor Group entries would win (the Palisade and Telluride are basically the same SUV below the metal), and as many guessed the Kia Telluride took home the honours.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon
The new 2020 Jeep Gladiator combines the off-road capability of a Wrangler with the functionality of a pickup truck.

“The Telluride’s interior layout and design would meet luxury SUV standards, while its refined drivetrain, confident driving dynamics and advanced technology maintain the premium experience,” commented Cox Automotive Executive Publisher Karl Brauer. “Traditional SUV brands take note: there’s a new star player on the field.”

Finally, this year’s “Truck” of the year finalists included the Ford Ranger (new to us yet available in Asian markets for years), the completely new Jeep Gladiator, and the redesigned Ram HD (Heavy Duty) 2500 and 3500, with the winner being the impressive new Gladiator. We’d have to look way back to 1999 in order to find a Jeep that won its category, incidentally, with that model being the Grand Cherokee.

2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon
Shown here in Rubicon trim, the Gladiator looks to match the current Wrangler’s impressive interior quality.

“What’s not to like about a pickup truck with not only a soft-top removable roof but even removable doors? If you want massive cargo-hauling capability or the ability to tow 10,000 pounds, buy something else,” said John Voelcker, an experienced automotive journalist. “The eagerly awaited Gladiator is a one-of-a-kind truck, every bit the Jeep its Wrangler sibling is … but with a pickup bed. How could you possibly get more American than that?”

NACTOY is an independent, non-profit organization, for your information, run by elected officers and funded by dues-paying journalist members.

Learn about the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette, 2020 Kia Telluride and 2020 Jeep Gladiator right here on CarCostCanada, where you can access trim, package and individual option pricing, plus rebate information and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands during negotiations with your local retailer. Although info about the new Corvette is not available yet, at the time of writing you could get up to $1,000 in additional incentives on the new Kia Telluride, or factory leasing and financing rates from 4.09 percent for the new Jeep Gladiator.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Chevrolet, Kia and Jeep

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door Road Test

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
Despite being three years into this current fifth-generation, the Impreza still looks very good.

Canada’s compact car class is amazingly competitive, but due to regularly enhancing its exterior design, massive improvements in cabin refinement, major gains made to its infotainment systems, and never-ending faith in its unique horizontally-opposed powertrain that connects through to standard all-wheel drive, Subaru has kept its Impreza wholly relevant at a time when competitors are cancelling their small cars.

News of discontinued models never goes over well with auto enthusiasts, even if the car in question is a rather mundane econobox. After all, the same marketplace sentiment that caused General Motors to axe the Chevrolet Cruze and its Volt EV counterpart is also responsible for the elimination of the Ford Focus along with its two sportiest trim lines, not to mention the once fun-to-drive Alfa Romeo-based Dodge Dart a few of years back. And these four are merely in the compact class; with many others falling by the wayside in the subcompact and full-size passenger car segments as well, all making way for new crossover SUVs and electric vehicles.

Subaru produces a full sleight of crossovers, its best-selling model being the Crosstrek that’s based on the Impreza 5-Door in this review. I happen to like that innovative little CUV very much, but I’m also a fan of compact wagons, which is pretty well what the Impreza 5-Door is.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The 5-Door is the sportiest of the two body styles.

We can call it a hatchback or maybe a liftback to make it seem sportier, but in reality the Impreza 5-Door is a compact wagon. Without doubt someone in Subaru Canada’s marketing division would rather I didn’t call it that, but they should also be aware enough to know this Japanese brand has a faithful following of wagon lovers. The Outback is little more than a lifted Legacy Wagon after all, the five-door Legacy unfortunately no longer available in our market.

The Impreza’s styling was improved with its most recent redesign in 2016, and it truly looks more upscale, even in its less expensive trim lines. This Sport model get fog lights and LED-enhanced headlamps even though it’s merely a mid-range trim, not to mention extended side sills, a discreet rear rooftop spoiler, and stylish LED tail lamps, while machine-finish double-Y-spoke 17-inch alloy wheels with black-painted pockets underpin the sophisticated look.

Subaru produces the Impreza in two body styles, the second being a 4-Door sedan, but this 5-Door is the more popular option in the Canadian market. Both look good and serve their purpose well, and by that I don’t just mean the satisfaction of personal tastes, as the four-door provides the security of being able to lock valuables away in a trunk, and the five-door has more room for loading cargo. The sedan’s trunk can only carry 348 litres of gear, which while not all that bad for a compact sedan is nowhere near as accommodating as a hatchback. Case in point, the Impreza 5-Door’s 588 litres of cargo carrying capacity behind the second row of seats makes it much more useful, and that usefulness only gets better when dropping its 60/40-split rear seatbacks down to open up 1,565 litres of available space.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The sport gets fog lamps and 17-inch alloy wheels.

The model tested for this review was a 2019, and yes I’m quite aware that the 2020 Impreza is already available, and therefore this review won’t be helpful for very long. Still, consumers willing to opt for a 2019 Impreza can save up to $2,500 in additional incentives (at the time of writing), as seen right here on our 2019 Subaru Impreza Canada Prices page, while folks wanting the updated 2020 Impreza can only access up to $750 in additional incentives, unless of course they become CarCostCanada members and take advantage of dealer invoice pricing that can save them thousands.

For 2020, Subaru is making its EyeSight suite of advanced driver assistance systems standard with Imprezas featuring automatic transmissions, but take note that EyeSight is only available with this Sport trim and the top-line Sport-tech model for 2019. The car tested didn’t include the advanced features, which means that it was missing pre-collision braking, pre-collision brake assist, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure warning, lane sway warning, lane keep assist, lead vehicle start alert, and adaptive cruise control. Subaru is making its Starlink connected services package available for 2020 too, and it’s included with most Impreza trims, while the new model’s styling has been updated on 4- and 5-Door body styles.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
Cabin quality and design is really impressive.

Nothing changes with respect to trim lines from 2019 to 2020, with the Impreza’s four trims remaining Convenience, Touring, Sport and Sport-tech. Model year 2019 4-Door pricing ranges from $19,995 to $30,195, whereas the 5-Door can be had from $20,895 to $31,095. The Impreza’s base price stays the same for 2020, but some pricing in between increases, with the new 5-Door adding $100 to its new $20,995 base price, and the top-line Sport-tech trim costing $30,795 for the 4-Door and $31,695 for the 5-Door.

The 2019 Impreza Sport 5-Door being reviewed here has a retail price of $25,395, but take note the new 2020 version will increase its price to $26,195. Like its two lesser siblings the Sport can be had with a five-speed manual transmission or an available Lineartronic CVT (continuously variable transmission) with standard steering wheel shift paddles, the latter how Subaru upgraded my test car. As usual, the brand’s Symmetrical AWD is standard equipment, which not only makes the Impreza the only car to feature standard AWD in the compact segment, but also one of the only vehicles in this class with available AWD period.

To clarify, Mazda recently showed up with AWD for its compact 3, while the latest Toyota Prius now can be had with an electrified e-AWD setup. VW will offer its Golf Alltrack crossover wagon until it sells out (sadly it’s been discontinued), but to be fair it’s more of a Crosstrek challenger as it is, while the brand’s Golf R competes directly with the Subaru WRX STI.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The dash gets a very impressive contrast stitched leatherette facing.

Volkswagen in mind, am I the only one to find it odd that this relatively small Japanese automaker has managed to keep the German brand’s horizontally opposed engine design relevant for all of these decades? Subaru has long made the boxer configuration its own, now sharing it only with Porsche and, occasionally, Ferrari, with its newest 2.0-litre, DOHC, 16-valve four producing a dependable 152 horsepower and 145 lb-ft of torque by means of direct injection, dual active valve control, and electronic throttle control. This is considerably more engine output than most rivals’ base engines, with in fact just three competitors make more power, and then not much more, plus just four putting out greater torque.

On the road, the Impreza performs strongly in a straight line, from a standing start all the way up to highway speeds. Its torquey engine works really well with the CVT that provides particularly smooth, linear power, while the paddle shifters are helpful when downshifting mid-corner. Still, the engine and transmission combination worked best when left on its own. Also smooth, Impreza’s ride is excellent, while its capability through the curves is typical of its fully independent front strut and rear double wishbone suspension layout, improved with stabilizer bars at each end.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
This simple gauge cluster is easy to read under any light.

The Impreza therefore offers up a more sophisticated suspension setup than a number of its peers that incorporate less expensive torsion bar designs in back, and this is truly noticeable when driving it hard through fast-paced corners on less than ideal stretches of pavement. Instead of experiencing the rear end hopping over the uneven tarmac, my tester’s 205/50R17 all-seasons remained planted on course, the little wagon making its rally race-bred heritage apparent through each and every turn.

This was when I looked down at my tester’s centre console and longed for the standard five-speed manual gearbox, as it would have been more fun to drive and likely quicker as well, but as it was the paddle shifters worked well when more revs were required, even though they come hooked up to a CVT. It worked well enough, actually, that I’d even consider choosing the CVT if this one was staying in my personal collection, not only because it’d make city driving easier, but also because the automatic is better on fuel, with an estimated rating of just 8.3 L/100km in the city, 6.4 on the highway and 7.5 combined, compared to 10.1 city, 7.5 highway and 8.9 combined for the manual.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The multi-information display atop the dash comes loaded with features.

While a great car to drive, the Impreza is wonderfully comfortable too, and not only because of its smooth ride. The front seats provide very good adjustability, but oddly the driver’s seat doesn’t have any lumbar adjustment in Sport trim. The seat is inherently supportive, thankfully, and due to plenty of reach from the tilt and telescoping steering column it was easy for me to get myself into an ideal driving position for good control of the leather-clad steering wheel and metal sport pedals. The steering wheel’s rim is shaped perfectly for a comfortable feel, while all the switchgear needed to control its audio, phone, cruise, and trip/multi-information display systems are on its spokes.

Unlike the majority of challengers, the Impreza’s mostly analogue instrument cluster simply divides its primary dials with a coloured TFT display for speed, gear selection, real-time fuel economy, the fuel level, plus the odometer and trip mileage readouts. Alternatively, Subaru houses the full multi-information display in a hooded 4.2-inch colour monitor on top of the centre dash. It incorporates a lot of information, with its top half-inch portion showing a digital clock, interior temperature reading, climate control settings, and the outside temperature, while the larger lower section can be organized as per a driver’s preference, with the options being audio system info, real-time fuel economy and projected range, all-wheel drive power distribution, a row of three digital gauges including water temperature, oil temperature and average speed, plus more.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The larger 8.0-inch touchscreen is superb.

The multi-information display’s quality of graphics and display resolution has made big gains this generation, but Subaru’s most impressive upgrades in recent years have been made to over in-car infotainment, specifically the main touchscreen on the centre stack, plus and host of functions. Choosing Sport trim means the centre display increases in size from 6.3 to 8.0 inches, while it’s also an ultra high-quality touchscreen with clear definition, beautifully vibrant colours, and wonderfully rich contrasts. Subaru’s tile design is attractive, with big colourful “buttons” overtop a starry blue background that-style graphic layout looks good and is really easy to operate, with its main features being radio, media, phone, apps, settings, and the automaker’s Starlink suite of apps. Navigation isn’t part of Sport trim, but Android Auto and Apple CarPlay is, and by integrating your smartphone can provide route guidance. The apps panel features Aha and iHeartRadio, plus two USB ports and an auxiliary plug provide smartphone connectivity. The reverse camera is good too, benefiting from active guidelines.

All heating, ventilation and air conditioning controls are located on a dedicated interface just under the centre display, while single-zone automatic climate control comes standard with Sport. It operates via three dials and two buttons, but don’t look there for the two-way seat heaters that get controlled via a pair of rocker switches on the lower console. This said, even in their hottest settings they don’t feel anywhere near therapeutic.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
These sport seats are truly supportive.

Subaru doesn’t provide a heatable steering wheel rim in Sport trim, which was a disappointment, but not as disappointing as not being able to get rear seat heaters in any trim at all. This is unusual for a car that would make an excellent family ski conveyance during the coldest season, but just the same the Impreza Sport 5-Door’s rear quarters were nicely furnished, although strangely without secondary air vents.

It’s plenty spacious in the rear passenger compartment, however, with about eight inches of room ahead of my knees when I sat behind the driver’s position that was set up for my five-foot-eight, short-torso, long-legged body type. I also had plenty of space to stretch my legs out with my feet below the front seat, while there was ample side-to-side either room along with a nice wide folding centre armrest with the usual two cupholders integrated within. Finally, I had approximately three inches of air space over my head, making the back seat a viable option for six-footers. The rear window seats also provide good lower back support, which I suppose makes it easier to look past the rear quarter’s lack of amenities.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The rear seating area is very spacious and the outboard seats are comfortable.

Speaking of the seats, my Sport trim tester’s cloth upholstery is mighty attractive, made up of a sharp looking patterned insert flanked by grey bolsters featuring contrast stitching. I have to say, every Impreza generation makes major strides in cabin refinement, with this most recent fifth-gen model a much more inviting place for driver and passengers with respect to materials quality and overall styling. One look at the contrast-stitched, leather-like pliable composite dash top and you’ll be impressed, this easily as good as this compact segment gets. The high-end surface treatment even flows down the right side of the centre stack and gets duplicated on the left section as well. It’s stunning.

The door uppers get a similarly soft synthetic covering whereas the armrests felt like real stitched leather. Subaru spruces things up further by adding carbon-fibre-like inlays, satin-silver/grey accents, chrome embellishment and more, while the interior buttons, knobs and switches are fitted tightly throughout the interior.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
There’s no shortage of space in the 5-Door’s cargo compartment.

I’ve already spoken about the cargo compartment’s impressive capacity, with its average amount of space behind the rear seats and better-the-average volume when they’re flattened, but I wish Subaru had included a 40/20/40-split instead of the 60/40 divide, or at least a centre pass-through. I know owners in this class are used to squishing their rear passengers into the 60-percent portion when loading longer items like skis in back, but there’s a much more elegant way that Subaru should adopt in order to further differentiate itself from most compact rivals. The Impreza does include a retractable cargo cover for hiding valuables, and it’s housed within a well-made, good looking aluminum cross-member that’s easy to remove.

All in all, I could see myself owning an Impreza 5-Door at some point, if I ever choose to give up this career and am forced to purchase a new car. It’s an ideal size for me, provides enjoyable performance and agreeable comfort combined with good fuel economy, is rated highly from a reliability standpoint, and is much more refined than many in this class. I like that its infotainment system is now in the top 10-percent of this segment, and even though I would have appreciated some additional features in my Sport test model, I drove a top-tier Sport-tech version couple of years ago and found it even more appealing than this model. All things said, the Impreza is a car you should consider seriously.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD Road Test

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The new Genesis G70 performs as well as it looks.

Few categories in the luxury auto sector are more competitive than the battle between compact sport sedans, so bringing an all-new entry into this class takes an entirely new level of courage.

If you haven’t already heard, Genesis is the new luxury brand of Hyundai Motor Group. Basically it’s what Lexus is to Toyota, Infiniti is to Nissan and Acura is to Honda, or for that matter what Audi is to Volkswagen. Each of the just-noted Japanese luxury brands were relative late arrivals compared to their European and domestic American counterparts, some having been around for more than a century.

With the G70, Genesis hasn’t exactly broken the mould like Tesla has with its lineup of electric vehicles, the Model 3 now leading this class in sales. Instead, the new G70 offers an attractive, well made, potent performing, and strong value propositioned alternative to market leaders such as BMW’s 3 Series, Mercedes-Benz’ C-Class and Audi’s A4, not to mention the many others including Lexus’ IS, Infiniti’s Q50, Acura’s TLX, Cadillac’s ATS, Volvo’s S60, Jaguar’s XE, and Alfa Romeo’s Giulia.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
Genesis has taken a conservative look with the new G70, but it still has a lot of style in 3.3T Sport AWD trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

That’s a full sleight of competitors, and didn’t even include all the coupes, convertibles and wagons, some of the coupes even boasting four doors like the Audi A5 Sportback and BMW 4 Series Gran Coupe. How has the G70 fared? Specifically regarding sales, Genesis Canada sold 1,119 G70s through calendar year 2019, which is quite good, even representing a 15.7-percent gain year-over-year (although the year prior was only 10 months as the G70 went on sale in March, 2018).

That puts its sales higher than some key rivals, namely the Cadillac ATS that required a sedan and coupe to total 1,032 units yet still dropped 36.1 percent from the year before, although that’s not as bad as the Alfa Romeo Giulia that lost 52.5 percent year-over-year with only 242 sales in 2019, not to mention Jaguar’s XE that plunged 72.5 percent after selling a mere 157 units last year, resulting in the last and final place in this segment.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
Sport trim includes a unique front fascia, LED headlights, fog lamps, 19-inch alloys and Brembo brakes with red calipers. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

That Genesis achieved 1,119 deliveries in a year that saw many of its competitors lose ground made for impressive beginnings. Let’s remember it’s a three-year old brand, and this is its first totally new model. Yes, the G90 full-size luxury sedan was new when it was introduced together with the entire brand in November 2016, but like the G80 mid-size luxury sedan it started off as an older Hyundai model. The G90 began as the Hyundai Equus, and therefore can be considered to be in its third generation, while the G80 merely had its rear badge changed from Hyundai’s stylized “H” to Genesis’ wings. In fact, it had been wearing the new Genesis brand’s logo on its hood and steering wheel for two generations and eight years already, thanks to previewing the Genesis nameplate.

To say the G70 is an important model for Genesis is an understatement, being that it made up 73.4 percent of Genesis sales in 2019. The G80 found just 324 new owners last year, and the G90 just 82 (that’s nowhere near last place, by the way, but rather 18th from last, with Canada’s worst sales going to the Kia K900 that had zero deliveries and ironically shares its platform architecture with the G90).

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The G70 offers up a very impressive interior.

The first Genesis win is styling, with the G70 providing the kind of good looks it needs in order to stand out. It has a strong, aggressive stance, yet it’s not too over-the-top either, other than maybe its nonfunctional front fender vents. It’s also sized perfectly to fit within the compact luxury D-segment, measuring 4,685 millimetres from nose to tail with a 2,835-mm wheelbase, 1,850 mm wide, and 1,400 mm tall, which makes it near identically proportioned to the current C-Class sedan, and only a bit shorter than the 3 Series. This appears to be an ideal size for compact luxury sedans, compared to the Infiniti Q50 that’s quite a bit longer.

This results in a car that’s completely comfortable front to back, yet light and quick enough for good manoeuvrability. Its driving position is very good, with lots of reach and rake from adjustable steering column, while the driver’s seat is excellent, with good upper leg, lumbar, and side support. The steering wheel is smartly shaped for comfort and control, with shift paddles where they need to be for fast gear changes, while the pistol grip-style shift knob on the lower console-mounted lever is simply there for selecting D, R or N, P found on a button just in front. A lovely rotating knurled metal dial allows for drive mode selection, the choices being Comfort, Eco, Smart, Sport and Custom, and while I tried each one out for testing purposes, I’m sure you can hazard to guess which one I used most often.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The G70’s cabin easily measures up to the compact luxury class leaders.

Base G70s use an eight-speed automatic transmission, which gets Idle Stop and Go to automatically shut off the engine in order to save fuel and limit emissions when it would otherwise be idling, and then quickly restart it again when lifting off the brake pedal. The entry-level 2.0-litre turbo-four is good for 252 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque, and is also the sole engine available with a six-speed manual in performance-oriented 2.0T Sport RWD trim. The “RWD” portion of the trim designation gives away its rear-drive nature as well, this being the only G70 without AWD, but this model actually puts out an extra 3 horsepower over its auto-equipped 2.0T brethren. The base G70 is the 2.0T Advanced AWD model, which gets followed by 2.0T Elite AWD and 2.0T Prestige AWD trims.

The only two trims using the upgraded twin-turbocharged 3.3-litre V6 power unit, which makes 365 horsepower and 376 lb-ft of torque, is the 3.3T Dynamic AWD model and the top-tier 3.3T Sport AWD being tested here. The powertrain has a nice eager exhaust note at idle, while choosing Sport mode automatically adds air to sport driver seat’s bladder-infused bolsters, this exclusive 16-way power-adjustable seat providing excellent lateral support, not to mention four-way lumbar support and an always appreciated lower cushion extension that made it wonderfully comfortable.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The G70’s gauge cluster gets a nice 7.0-inch multi-info display at centre.

The 3.3-litre V6 makes for a brilliantly quick getaway car, blasting from zero to 100 km/h in just less than five seconds, while its exhaust note becomes addictive as the engine soars toward its 7,000-rpm redline. The eight-speed automatic delivers quick, sharp shifts in Sport mode, the paddle shifters only adding to the intensity, this particularly true through corners where the G70 feels light, lively and oh-so eager to impress, making it a great deal more enjoyable to drive than the equivalent Lexus IS 350 F Sport, not to mention many others in this class.

The brakes are very strong and don’t fade away after repetitive foot stomps. The Sport gets four-piston front and two-piston rear high-performance Brembos with fixed red-painted calipers, which are easily up to task. The G70 has impressive balance thanks to a well-sorted front strut and five-link independent rear suspension setup that never gets out of shape, yet provided a nice, compliant ride even with my test model’s big 19-inch staggered-width alloy wheels encircled by 225/40 front and 255/35 rear Michelin Pilot Sport 4 summer performance tires.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The G70’s infotainment system is no more upscale than what you’d find in a Hyundai.

My G70 Sport’s outstanding stability probably has a lot to do with my its upgraded adaptive control suspension. This is a high-performance suspension control system that distributes front and rear damping forces when a driving situation becomes potentially dangerous and/or unstable, aiding in accidence avoidance. Safety in mind, upper G70 trims also get forward collision assist with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning and lane keeping assist, and driver attention warning, whereas all G70s include blind spot collision warning with lane change assist, plus rear cross-traffic collision warning.

A motor-driven rack-and-pinion steering system gets Variable Gear Ratio assistance for quick, positive response to inputs, yet it never felt nervous. Actually, the G70 tracks really well at high speed, its mechanical limited-slip differential helping out rear traction. Truly, the G70 is a sport-luxury sedan I could live with every day, my only wish being a racetrack that would allow me to test it to its maximum (or my maximum), but even in congested city traffic it was easy to drive.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The G70’s eight-speed automatic is one excellent transmission.

It was during such slower speeds that I had time to enjoy its nicely detailed cabin. Everything is extremely well put together, with the expected pliable composite surfaces above the waste, except for the glove box lid and surrounding surfaces next to the steering wheel. Most buttons, knobs and switches were high quality, but its aluminized silver buttons with blue backlit lettering came across a bit too much like Hyundai products, as did the 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen atop the centre dash, and its graphic interface. It’s filled with plenty of features, such as Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, a navigation system, a multi-view camera, Genesis Connected Services, etcetera, the 15-speaker Lexicon audio system with Quantum Logic surround sound being very good, although most others in this category offer some sort of infotainment controller on the lower console, and not just a touchscreen.

Ahead of the driver is a large 7.0-inch, highly functional TFT multi-infotainment display as well, and while it was nice and bright plus plenty colourful, I wondered why it wasn’t a fully digital instrument cluster being that it’s a brand new model and Genesis would have been able to include one in upper trims, this being all the rage right now.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
Choose your drive mode with this knurled metal selector.

A nicer surprise was the diamond-patterned quilted black and grey highlighted Nappa leather upholstery on the seats and door panels. This is the kind of over-the-top opulence I expect to find with an Aston Martin or Bentley, not an entry-level Genesis sedan. The seats even included stylish grey piping on their side bolsters and at the top of each backrest. This comes as part of my Sport model’s standard Sport Appearance Package that also adds the power-adjustable bolsters and seat cushion extension on the driver’s seat noted before, plus metal foot pedals and a black microsuede headliner and roof pillars.

The G70 is also as nicely finished in its rear quarters as it is up front, the back outboard seats including three-way seat warmers. Those up front included these as well, plus the driver could warm his/her hands on a heatable steering wheel rim, and two front seats were also ventilated for cooling during summer. Dual-zone auto climate control managed cabin comfort, of course, while the usual smartphone connectivity and various charging ports were also included, my go-to choice being a wireless charging pad.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The 16-way driver’s seat that comes standard in Sport trim is truly amazing.

The poorly finished cargo compartment was disappointing, the G70’s trunk no better than what you might find in a Hyundai product. It’s slightly shallower than some peers, plus its hinges take up more room than struts would. Worse, the load floor feels flimsy, and the split-folding rear seatbacks are only divided in a 60/40 configuration, with no centre pass-through, making the G70 less flexible for passengers and cargo than some of its European rivals.

To be fair, the G70 is quite a bargain when compared to most of its German competition, with a base price of only $42,000 (plus freight and fees). Even the most affordable Mercedes-Benz C-Class sedan starts at $46,100, while the least expensive BMW 3 Series sedan takes an investment of $49,000. Even pricier, the slow selling Jaguar XE needs $49,900 before it can be taken home, while Alfa Romeo Giulia can’t be had under $50,445. Of course, some rivals undercut the G70, such as the Audi A4 that only needs $39,800 to procure, while a base Lexus IS (RWD) can be had for $41,250, but these don’t offer the same level of standard features as the G70.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The rear seat could use a bit more legroom, but it’s comfortable.

By the way, you can learn about full-range pricing for each of these models just mentioned right here at CarCostCanada (just click on the links for the car names above). CarCostCanada has trim, package and individual options info, plus you can find out about available offers, such as the zero-percent factory leasing and financing rates now provided by Genesis for 2019 and 2020 G70 models. Before you buy or even contact your Genesis dealer, or any of the others, make sure to also get your CarCostCanada membership so you can go to your local dealer with invoice pricing in order to make sure you get the best deal possible. 

The 2020 G70 hasn’t changed from this 2019 model, incidentally, other than the discontinuation of the 3.3T Dynamic AWD model and availability of new higher-end 3.3T Prestige AWD trim. The base price remains the same too, although some of the other trims move up in price, including this Sport trim that gets a new standard power trunk lid so therefore adds $500 for a new total of $58,000.

2019 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport AWD
The trunk lacks refinement and its 60/40-split seatbacks don’t offer the convenience of a centre pass-through.

In the end, the 2019 Genesis G70 is a superb sport-luxury sedan with very few negatives. It’s particularly good for those that drive enthusiastically, as it rewards skillful drivers with brilliant straight-line acceleration and wonderfully predictable, thoroughly capable road holding. This said its good balance and the AWD model’s tendency to understeer make it safe for newer drivers too, while its cabin quality and refinement will impress everyone, with plenty of comfort and some of the most luxurious details in the class.

Of course, it’s not faultless, its claimed 13.3 L/100km city, 9.5 highway and 11.6 combined fuel economy notably thirsty (the four-cylinder, AWD model gets an estimated 11.5, 8.7 and 10.3 respectively), but I think its pros, that include a five-year, 100,000-km comprehensive warranty, outweigh its cons, so I have no problem recommending the G70 to anyone thinking of purchasing a new compact luxury sedan.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro Road Test

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
The Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro looks stunning in its outdoors element.

Not to long ago people were calling for the traditional SUV to die. GM cancelled Hummer, Ford said goodbye to the Excursion, and a number of 4×4-capable sport utilities were converted to car-based crossovers in order to appeal to a larger audience. While the general public has certainly eschewed rugged off-roaders as well as passenger cars for crossover SUVs, there’s certainly a healthy niche for true 4x4s.

The 4Runner has been at the centre of this mix, and has been doing so as long as I’ve been out of school. Yes, the 4Runner came into existence the year I graduated in 1981, and is now well into its fifth generation, which was introduced more than a decade ago. The original 4Runner was little more than the pickup truck with a removable composite roof, much like the original Chevy Blazer and second-gen Ford Bronco that came before, but the next version that came in 1989 included a full roof, and the rest of the story is now history.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
Voodoo Blue certainly stands out, as does the TRD Pro model’s unique styling.

Over the years Toyota has stayed true to the 4Runner’s off-road-capable character and garnered respect and steady sales for doing so. Now it’s one of a mere handful of truck-based SUVs available, making it high on the shopping list for consumers needing family transportation yet wanting something that can provide more adventure when called upon.

The 2019 model being reviewed here is currently being replaced by a new 2020 model, which changes up the infotainment system with a new larger 8.0-inch touchscreen, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, satellite radio and USB audio, plus the brand’s Connected Services suite. Push-button ignition gets added too, as does Toyota’s Safety Sense P bundle of advanced driver assistance features including pre-collision system with vehicle and pedestrian detection, lane departure warning and assist, automatic high beams, and dynamic radar cruise control.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
TRD Pro trim includes a special front fascia and these meaty 17-inch wheels and tires.

A new Venture trim level gets added as well, which builds on just-above-base TRD Off-Road trim. This means it begins with 4×4 features like 4-Wheel Crawl Control with Multi-Terrain Select, a locking rear differential, and the Kinematic Dynamic Suspension (KDSS) upgrade, while it also gets a hood scoop plus a navigation system with traffic and weather, all before adding black mirror caps, trim, and badging, Predator side steps, 17-inch TRD Pro alloy wheels, and a basket style roof rack.

All of that sounds pretty impressive, but serious off-roaders will still want the TRD Pro that I tested for a week. Not only does it look a lot tougher, particularly in its exclusive Voodoo Blue paint scheme with matte black trim, but it also gets a unique heritage “TOYOTA” grille, a TRD-stamped aluminum front skid plate, a whole lot of black accents and badges nose to tail, and superb looking matte black 17-inch alloys with TRD centre caps on massive 31.5-inch Nitto Terra Grappler all-terrain tires (my tester’s rubber was a set of Bridgestone Blizzak 265/70 studless snow tires).

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
This handy roof rack comes standard with TRD Pro trim.

Overcoming obstacles is aided via TRD-tuned front springs and TRD Bilstein high-performance shocks with rear remote reservoirs, while the 4Runner TRD Pro also gets an automatic disconnecting differential to overcome the really rough stuff, as does its rear differential lock if the ground is slippery, and multi-terrain ABS when it’s a downward grade.

Previously noted Crawl Control is ideal for going up, down or just motoring along a low-speed stretch of horizontal terrain, and is selectable via a dial on the overhead console next to a similar dial for the Multi-Terrain Select system that makes choosing the four-wheel drive system’s best possible response over “LIGHT” to “HEAVY” terrain an easy process. Of course, overcoming a really challenging trail will require shifting from “H2” or “H4” to “L4” to engage the 4Runner’s lower set of gears via the console-mounted 4WD Selector lever.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
The 4Runner hasn’t changed much over the past 10 years, but it’s still well made and functional.

This SUV is an amazingly good 4×4, something I was reminded of when trudging through a local off-road course I use whenever I have something worthy of its rutted trails and long, deep swampy pools. I recently tested Jeep’s Wrangler Unlimited Sahara through this course, and did likewise with a Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 turbo-diesel that had mucky water splashing over its hood. Heck, I even proved that Toyota wasn’t trying pull one over on compact crossover buyers with its new RAV4 Trail, that can actually hold its own through this mud-fest, although I didn’t push it anywhere near as hard as the others just mentioned, or this 4Runner TRD Pro.

My 4Runner test model’s hood scoop never tasted water, incidentally, nor did it ever require the Tacoma TRD Pro’s cool looking snorkel, and trust me, I was careful not to muck up the white and red embroidered floor mats, or even soil the breathable leather-like Black SofTex seat upholstery, highlighted by red contrast stitching and red embroidered “TRD” logos on the front headrests I should add. It would have been easy enough to wash off, but I keep my test vehicles clean out of respect to the machinery.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
The 4Runner’s Optitron gauges are really attractive.

This 4Runner TRD Pro makes it easy to drive through most any 4×4 course or wayward trail, even if there’s not much drive down. Simply choose the best Multi-Terrain setting and engage Crawl Control if you think you’ll want to push yourself up higher in the driver’s seat in order to see over a ridge, which would make it so you couldn’t modulate the gas pedal. Alternatively you can use it in order to relax your right foot, like a cruise control for ultra-slow driving. We had a mechanical version of this on my dad’s old Land Cruiser FJ40, which was basically a choke that held the throttle out, and it worked wonders just like the 4Runner’s modernized version. The now discontinued FJ Cruiser had one too, a model that shared its platform with this much bigger and more spacious SUV, as does the global market Land Cruiser Prado and Lexus GX 460.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
There’s nothing wrong with the 2019 4Runner’s infotainment system, but there will be a lot more right about the new 2020 version.

V8-powered 4x4s in mind, I remember when Toyota offered the fourth-generation 4Runner with a 4.7-litre V8. I really liked that truck and its smooth, potent powertrain, but I’d rather have the 2.8-litre turbo-diesel found in the current Prado, as it’s fuel economy would be advantageous in the city and on the highway, let alone in the wilderness where it could 4×4 a lot farther from civilization than the current 4.0-litre V6. Yes, the 4Runner’s big six-cylinder drinks healthily to put it kindly, with a rating of 14.3 L/100km city, 11.9 highway and 13.2 combined, while it goes through even more regular unleaded in low gear while off-roading. That’s this SUV’s only major weakness, and now that Jeep is bringing its Wrangler to our market with a turbo-diesel, and the aforementioned Chevy Colorado gets one too, it’s might be time for Toyota to provide Canadian off-road enthusiasts an oil burner from its global parts bin.

Another weakness at the pump is the 4Runner’s five-speed automatic transmission, but on the positive it’s rugged and reliable so it’s hard to complain, while shifts smoothly. The TRD Pro adds red stitching to the leather shift knob, almost making this gearbox feel sporty when engaging its manual mode, and I should also commend this heavyweight contender for managing the curves fairly well, no matter if it’s on tarmac or gravel, while its ride quality is also quite good, something I appreciated as much in town as I did on the trail.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
The powered seats are comfortable, but that’s SofTex leatherette, not leather covering them.

I would have appreciated the 4Runner even more if it included shock-absorbing seats like my old ‘86 Land Cruiser BJ70, but the TRD Pro’s power-actuated seats with two-way powered lumbar managed comfort decently enough, while the SUV’s tilt and telescoping steering column provided enough reach to set up my driving position for comfort and control.

The steering wheel’s rim is wrapped in leather, but doesn’t get the nice red stitching from the shift knob, yet its spokes are filled with all the most important buttons. Framed through its upper section, the Optitron primary gauge cluster is a comprised of truly attractive blues, reds and whites on black with a small trip computer at centre.

At dash central, the infotainment touchscreen may be getting replaced for the 2020 model year, but the one in this 2019 4Runner was certainly sized large enough for my needs, plus was reasonably high-resolution and packed full of stylish graphics and loads of functions. Its reverse camera lacked active guidelines, but was quite clear, while the navigation system’s route guidance was accurate and its mapping system easy to read, plus the audio system was pretty good as well.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
The second row is extremely roomy.

The 4Runner’s window seats are comfortable and the entire second row amply sized for most any body type, but the TRD Pro model’s third row gets axed, leaving plenty of room for gear. There’s in fact 1,337 litres of space behind the 60/40-split second row, or up to 2,540 litres it’s lowered, making the 4Runner ideal for those that regularly haul tools or other types of equipment, campers, skiers, etcetera.

You can buy a new 2019 4Runner for $46,155 or less (depending on your negotiating chops), while leasing and financing rates can be had from 1.99 percent (or at least they could at the time of writing, according to the 2019 Toyota 4Runner Canada Prices page here at CarCostCanada). CarCostCanada also provides its members with money saving rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands, so be sure to purchase a membership before you head to the dealer. As for the 2020 4Runner, which starts at $48,120 thanks to the new equipment I detailed out before, only has leasing and financing rates from 4.49 percent as seen on the CarCostCanada 2020 Toyota 4Runner Canada Prices page, so the 2019 may be the smart choice for those on a budget. If you’re after this TRD Pro, you’ll be forced to find $56,580 plus freight and fees (less discount), and take note this is the most expensive 4Runner trim available.

2019 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro
No shortage of cargo space in here.

Yes this is luxury brand territory, and the 4Runner won’t try to dazzle you with soft-touch interior plastics or any other pampering premium treatments, but this should be okay because it’s a rugged, off-road capable 4×4 that shouldn’t need to pamper its passengers to impress them. Instead, together with its superb off-road-worthiness, overall ease of use and general livability, the 4Runner achieves top placement in the 2019 Canadian Black Book Best Retained Value Awards for its “Mid-size Crossover-SUV” category. I don’t know about you, but this matters more to me than pliable interior composite surfaces.

In the end, the 4Runner remains one of my favourite SUVs. It does most everything it needs to well, and is one of the better off-roaders available for any money. That suits my outdoor lifestyle to a tee.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

Buying a New Car: A Step-By-Step Guide to Getting it Right | Learn the Dealer Invoice Price in Canada

Getting a new car can be exciting and nerve-wracking; from managing your budget to finding that perfect car to managing paperwork, and paying at the dealership. CarCostCanada is dedicated to lessening the weight of this process with dealer invoice prices in Canada, you can get a new Honda Accord sedan price report.

 

What to bring

First of all, you need identification, probably your drivers’ license, especially if you plan to drive it off yourself. Next would be your payment whatever form that may take. And then lastly proof of insurance, because it’s illegal to drive in Canada this is necessary before driving off the lot. You can do it beforehand or at the dealership and give your insurance company your new vehicle identification number (VIN) so they can email over your insurance credentials to the dealership directly.

 

Payment 

It’s important to get your financing and payment type in order before heading over to the dealership. Preapproved loans from a bank or credit union might be an option for you but If this is your first car purchase you might have trouble getting a loan from the bank without a credit score. Make sure to look around as well, don’t just settle on your own personal bank, certain lending authorities could have ties to dealers which allows them to give out easier loans.

Past using loans, your down payment could be in many different forms from a cashiers cheque, personal cheque, or even a credit card payment. Usually, a credit card downpayment will be around $3000 or $5000 max. Even if it is a possibility and the car is very inexpensive, do not expect to pay full upfront. Dealerships want to be safe and minimize the risk of someone claiming alleged fraud or disputing the purchase, they also want to avoid being the victims of credit card fraud themselves so large down payments are especially uncommon.

 

Trade-in Vehicle

Another way to help out with payments past loans is to trade in your old car. To do this you’ll be needing extra documents though; proof the car is yours, car title or a pink slip, a copy of the current registration, and potentially payment stubs and the loan account number for the car. Financing a new car like this can reduce your monthly payments and give you a lower tax rate. The estimated value of your used car is used towards the price of the new one, potentially knocking down a $30,000 car down to $20,000 which can make a big difference.

 

All done and ready to drive off?

Before you head on the road with your new car it’s important to check over it a final time. Make sure everything that should have been included is there and that you know exactly where everything is. The manual, chargers if it’s an electric or hybrid model, all your documents, and everything you were promised. Also, check the condition one last time, it’s easy to get lost in the excitement of a new vehicle and accidentally miss something and it’s best to make sure you’re getting the car in the best quality.

Now it’s time to enjoy your new car! With this, you can be better prepared for when you go in to buy a car and using our price reports you will be able to find the best deal and price on your ideal car. With a new year, there are new models and features so check out what possibilities await you with a new car!

Genesis shows off photos of upcoming GV80 luxury SUV

2021 Genesis GV80
The new GV80 is Genesis’ first foray into the world of SUVs, and it’s making a pretty good first impression.

If you were wondering how the fledgling Genesis brand would manage to grow while only offering passenger cars, its new GV80 crossover SUV should certainly appeal more to a luxury market mostly focused on sport utilities.

Genesis, Hyundai Motor Group’s luxury brand, just revealed a few photos of the all-new premium crossover this week, and it certainly grabs attention. It sports a larger, stronger updated version of the Korean brand’s new pentagonal grille, shown first in production trim on the brand’s recently redesigned 2020 G90 luxury sedan, plus it incorporates a number of additional styling elements from that full-size four-door, such as horizontal LED Quad Lamp headlights and wraparound tail lamps, not to mention side vents on the front fenders. The initial design was formed from the GV80 Concept launched at the 2017 New York auto show, but we must say it looks nicer in production trim than the prototype.

2021 Genesis GV80
Is it just us, or do you see some Cadillac in the grille design?

“GV80 allows us to expand our definition of Athletic Elegance design language to a new typology, while retaining sublime proportionality and sophistication of form,” said Luc Donckerwolke, Executive Vice President, Chief Design Officer of Hyundai Motor Group.

Genesis gives its design language the name “Athletic Elegance”, and while this descriptor might sound somewhat generic, the luxury crossover’s overall presence certainly isn’t. Its grille pays some tribute to Cadillac, mind you, only missing the American brand’s big crested-wreath shield at centre. Genesis even names the SUV’s most prominent feature the “Crest Grille” and claims it as a “signature Genesis design element,” but to be fair a lot of brands have tried to adapt a five-sided shape for a grille design, including Acura and Honda. No doubt Genesis would rather we focus on its trademark headlamps, and to that end few will likely argue against any of the GV80’s other styling details or its appearance overall.

2021 Genesis GV80
We really like the new Quad Lamp LED headlights.

“The Quad Lamp, our design signature, introduces an unmistakable visual impression completely unique to Genesis,” said Sang Yup Lee, Senior Vice President, Head of Genesis Design. Like other lighting elements throughout the SUV, the headlights feature a “G-Matrix pattern” that was “inspired by beautiful orchids seen when diamonds are illuminated by light,” stated Genesis in a press release, also mentioning that the GV80’s wheel design was similarly inspired.

Anyone who’s sat in one of Genesis’ new models should have been impressed by its materials quality and refinement, so rest assured the GV80 won’t be the exception. The brand states the new SUV “focuses on the beauty of open space, characteristic of the elegant South Korean architectural aesthetic,” and while this claim might be difficult for some to conceptualize, the new SUV does appear to offer up an elegantly minimalist cabin.

2021 Genesis GV80
The GV80’s side styling is quite sporty.

Once again it shares some inspiration from the new 2020 G90’s interior, but its instrument panel is more traditional thanks to an arcing primary gauge cluster hood and a more conventional tablet-style infotainment display fixed to the top of the dash. The horizontal theme continues, however, with slim air vents that span the entire instrument panel, this hovering atop a downward flowing centre stack featuring an attractive climate control touchscreen. The lower console is almost entirely flush with no shift lever at all, Genesis integrating a “jewel-like” rotating gear selector instead, which provides a more upscale, sophisticated appearance, while open-pore hardwoods, rich leathers and what looks to be genuine aluminum trim embellish the surroundings.

The upcoming GV80 rides on fresh new rear-wheel drive underpinnings and will be available in both rear- and all-wheel drivetrains in the U.S. market, but take note the RWD model probably won’t make it to Canada. If the GV80 comes close to performing like other Genesis models, we should be in for a treat as the Korean brand does an excellent job of balancing performance and comfort.

2021 Genesis GV80
The GV80’s interior looks sensational.

The GV80 is a mid-size utility, sized to go up against the Lexus RX, BMW X5, Mercedes-Benz GLE, Audi Q7, and many others including the new Cadillac XT6. It will come standard with five seats from two rows, but unlike some of its competitors it will be available with three rows for a total of seven passengers, while staying true to the “V” in its GV80 designation, which stands for “versatility”, it should be competitive with respect to passenger space and cargo room.

When it goes on sale later this year, it will expand Genesis’ lineup to four, also including the G70 compact sedan, G80 mid-size sedan, and aforementioned G90 full-size sedan. No doubt the new SUV will strengthen the upstart luxury brand’s sales, therefore giving it a more solid financial stance within its global markets.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Genesis