2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design Road Test

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
Stylish enough for you? Volvo is now one of the more attractive brands, no matter the segment it competes in. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Let’s face it. If a given compact luxury car isn’t stamped with a three-pointed star, a set of four intertwined rings, or a blue and white roundel it’s going to have a difficult time getting noticed anywhere in Canada. Mercedes-Benz’ C-Class, Audi’s A4 and A5, plus BMW’s 3 and 4 Series pretty much own this highly contested market segment, which therefore leaves a slew of bit players squabbling over leftovers, but then again the models just noted are no longer the premium sector powerhouse combination they once were. 

Now the majority in this class are beleaguered by their own compact luxury crossover SUV brilliance, or more specifically, despite year-over-year sales of the BMW X3, for instance, being up a sizeable 48.6-percent from calendar year 2017 to 2018, deliveries of the once bellwether 3 Series were down 19.5 percent last year, and the significantly lower volume 4 Series off by 5.4 percent during the same 12 months. 

Not every D-segment car bled red ink, mind you, with the just noted C-Class up by 6.5 percent, the Infiniti Q50 gaining 6.8 percent of additional ground, and Audi’s A5 improving its sales by an astonishing 25 percent, albeit after a complete overhaul relieved pent-up demand. As you may imagine, some other some rivals experienced a great deal more contraction than the BMW 3 Series during 2018, including the Lexus RC that saw its sales plummet by a shocking 37.9 percent, plus the Jaguar XE which fell by 27.8 percent, the Cadillac ATS that was off some 25.4 percent, the Acura TLX that dropped 25.2 percent, the Infiniti Q60 which was under water by 24.2 percent, and the Audi A4 having slipped backward by a surprising 20.3-percent. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
It’s sleek styling does more than just look good, it provides excellent aerodynamics too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Such massive losses make the two Volvo 60 series models’ slight downturn of 5.1 percent appear much less significant, and to shed yet more light on why they dropped in year-over-year popularity, the V60 sport wagon experienced such amazing growth from 2016 through 2017 (the old S60 sedan was part of these numbers as well) at 99.7 percent, dipping slightly the following year was inevitable. 

Still, measuring success in this segment has less to do with modest gains in sales percentages as it does with sales volume, and to that end both 60-series Volvos were only able to lure in 1,245 Canadian buyers collectively through all of 2018, which pales in comparison to the 11,556 C-Class sedans, coupes, convertibles and wagons sold into this country, or the 10,173 Audi A4 sedans and crossover wagons, that number also including A5 convertibles plus two- and four-door coupes, and lastly the 9,733 BMW 3 Series sedans and wagons, and 4 Series’ convertibles plus two- and four-door coupes. 

All others were a far cry less popular, with Infiniti’s two models combining for 3,424 units, the duo of Lexus cars (excluding the ES) managing to attract just 3,163 takers, the Acura TLX earning only 2,397 deliveries, and the soon to be discontinued Cadillac ATS luring in 1,615 new buyers, while far below the Volvo 60 series cars was the new Genesis G70 that found 967 new owners, the Jaguar XE with 571 out the showroom door, and finally the Alfa Romeo Giulia with just 510 units down the road. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
R-Design trim includes plenty of unique exterior styling upgrades, including this modified grille. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Such talk might possibly cause you to forget about any other D-segment brands than Mercedes, BMW and Audi, but I recommend taking a step back and considering some of the others on offer, because just being popular doesn’t necessarily translate into better. In fact, you may find the new 2019 Volvo S60 matches your personal taste and fulfills your lifestyle to a much greater degree. 

There was once a time that Volvo was respected first and foremost for safety, followed by stalwart durability, and while such worthy traits are still high on the luxury brand’s list of attributes, the former most recently verified by IIHS Top Safety Pick and Top Safety Pick Plus ratings for two of its more recently redesigned models, as well as its host of standard advanced driver assistance features such as Driver Alert Control, automatic front collision warning, full low- and high-speed autonomous emergency braking, steering support, Run-Off Road Mitigation, lane keeping assist, and Oncoming Lane Mitigation, plus all the expected active and passive safety items, even including a driver’s knee airbag, front whiplash protection, and pyrotechnical seatbelt pretensioners in all seating positions, there’s a lot more to the brand’s desirability now than ever before. 

Before getting into that, I wanted to point out what Oncoming Lane Mitigation is referring to. If the new S60 sedan’s sensors detect a head-on collision, the new oncoming braking system will automatically activate full braking force a mere two-tenths of a second before impact, resulting in vehicle speed reduction of 10 km/h before impact, says Volvo, which could potentially save lives, or at least minimize injuries. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
Fashionable LED headlights, sharp lower fascia trim, and these optional 19-inch alloys helped my tester stand out. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

On top of the S60’s list of non-safety and durability attributes is styling, but this said I’m not going to delve into design very much this time around, because the new model’s full LED “Thor’s Hammer” headlamps have been discussed ad nauseum in all of my recent Volvo road tests and news stories, as have the “hook” or C-shaped LED tail lamps now framing the backside of Volvo’s two new sedans. My personal preference with respect to overall styling leans more toward the sportier S60 when put up against the previously reviewed S90, but I think both Volvo four-door models look great, measuring up to, and in some ways surpassing their aforementioned rivals. 

So how does the new S60 fit into its D-segment dimensionally? It’s been given a dose of steroids compared to the second-generation 2010–2018 model it replaces, now measuring 133 millimetres (5.2 inches) longer from front to back at 4,761 millimetres (187.4 inches), while its wheelbase has been lengthened by 96 mm (3.8 in) to 2,872 mm (113.1 in). This said the new car’s width is down some 15 mm (0.6 in) to just 1,850 mm (72.8 in), plus its roofline has been lowered by 53 mm (2.1 in). 

Rear legroom is the direct benefactor of the longer wheelbase, resulting in a back seating area that’s much more spacious than it was before, with room to move around and wonderfully comfortable outboard seats boasting superb lumbar support. The comfort quotient is even more pronounced up front, where my R-Design trimmed tester was fitted with six-way power contoured sport seats featuring four-way power-adjustable lumbar that easily found my lower back’s sweet spot. What’s more, the driver’s seat includes a power-activated extendable squab that ideally cupped under my knees for even more support and comfort. Standard two-way memory made it easy to get back to a previously chosen seat setting, but one of my favourite R-Design seat features was the Fine Nappa leather covering all positions from front to back, highlighted by sporty contrast stitching that matched yet more off-white thread throughout the rest of the cabin. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
No rival has LED taillights that look like these. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As sharp as the seats look I don’t think they’ll be first to grab your attention when sitting behind the wheel, because the S60 R-Design interior is so impressive you’ll be more likely to get distracted by its contemporary yet classically luxurious take on design, not to mention all the brilliantly detailed metal accents and plush surfaces. 

Unique to the R-Design is a three-spoke leather-wrapped sport steering wheel, metal sport pedals, R-Design branded floor mats, and R-Design etched metal door sills, while additional interior highlights include a black headliner, a large 12.3-inch TFT gauge package, a sizeable vertically-positioned centre touchscreen featuring Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, navigation, and more, plus four-zone automatic climate control with nicely sorted rear controls, and the list goes on. I really like the R-Design’s unique Metal Mesh accents, and some of that switchgear mentioned earlier is downright jewel-like, particularly the sparkling ignition dial and rotating drive mode selector cylinder, the latter of which let’s you choose between Comfort, Eco and Dynamic settings. Truly, the eye-arresting opulence found in the new 2019 S60, which mirrors most new Volvo models, will be sure to wow anyone moving up from their old S60, let alone one of the cars it competes against. 

As mentioned in my V6 sport wagon review, I was fortunate enough to have it in my possession for three weeks over the Christmas holidays. It was kitted out in top-tier Inscription guise, which while a bit pricier than this R-Design, whether we’re talking that V60 or this S60, doesn’t get many more features. Inscription trim is simply a more luxuriously styled version of any Volvo model, whereas the R-Design designation reveals sport themed styling and performance, which leaves the Momentum as the base entry-level model, albeit very nice just the same. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
The S60 R-Design provides one of the nicest interiors in its class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I expect Volvo will make its T8 AWD Polestar performance trim available for the S60 sometime soon as well, which in other models includes a plug-in hybrid powertrain that’s good for 400 horsepower and 400 lb-ft of torque thanks to its internal combustion engine being this S60 R-Design’s turbocharged and supercharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder. 

Both R-Design and Inscription models come standard with this top-line T6 AWD powertrain, while this potent combination is made optional with Momentum trim, which otherwise comes with Volvo’s standard T5 FWD powertrain in base guise. The lesser engine features the same 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine sans the supercharger, resulting in 250 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque, whereas the T6 AWD provides a more robust 316 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque. 

Each powertrain is made standard with automatic idle start/stop, a technology that helps minimize tailpipe emissions while reducing fuel consumption by temporarily killing the engine while the car is standing still idling. Together with a number of other efficiency features it helps the T5 FWD model receive a rating of 9.9 L/100km in the city, 6.6 on the highway and 8.4 combined, while this T6 AWD version is capable of 11.1 in the city, 7.3 on the highway and 9.4 combined. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
Beautiful design and high quality materials come standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I don’t know about you, but I was a lot more interested in how the S60 R-Design drove than how little fuel I could get away with using, despite what seem like never-ending fuel price increases in my part of the world. Rest assured that it’s a lot more fun to pilot down a twisting two-lane country back road than my V60 Inscription tester was, not that the stylish sport wagon was a slouch by any sense of the imagination. Still, the S60 felt quicker in a straight line, thanks to fast-reacting all-wheel drive making the most of its sticky optional 235/40R19 Pirelli all-season rubber. Those meaty tires immediately found grip, allowing the potent little 2.0-litre powerplant to ramp up speed quickly, its eight-speed automatic gearbox an ideal compatriot, especially with Dynamic sport mode engaged. Despite its quick-shifting capability, the transmission was wonderfully smooth, while its steering wheel paddle shifters provided enough go-fast connectivity to keep my fingers in play. Adding to the fun, the S60 R-Design’s exhaust creates sonorous notes from behind when the throttle is pegged, yet is otherwise silent like the car’s well-insulated cabin. Truly, the S60 R-Design does a nice balancing act between sport and luxury. 

Likewise, the S60 R-Design does a commendable job straightening curves, due partially to lowered sport suspension that includes firmer shocks for stiffer, flatter handling through quick corners, resulting in a stable, predictable sport sedan even when hurled nonchalantly into hairpin curves, some of these corners off-camber and surfaced with uneven tarmac. I’ve taken some of the S60’s challengers through these sections and not all proved as agile, the S60 R-Design not getting unglued when flung back and forth through continual left, right, and left turns either. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
The R-Design’s standard gauge cluster is a TFT panel that measures 12.3 inches. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

If you weren’t aware, the new S60 sits on Volvo’s SPA, a.k.a. it’s Scalable Product Architecture, which underscores the brand’s S90 luxury flagship sedan as well as the majority of its new models. SPA features aluminum double wishbones up front and a unique integral link design in back, the latter incorporating a transverse lightweight composite leaf spring. Additionally, the S60 includes driver-selectable low, medium and high personal power steering settings to aid feel, while the car’s brakes are a good match to its handling prowess and accelerative force, providing good binding power when stomped upon, as well as smooth progression no matter how hard, or soft, the centre pedal is pressed. Still, as capable as the S60 R-Design was at heightening my senses when extracting its full performance potential, it always kept its luxury sedan roots intact due to impressive ride quality and the superbly comfortable driver’s seat noted earlier. 

Ride and handling in mind, the S60 R-Design, priced at $52,400 plus freight and fees, normally rolls on 18-inch alloy wheels, while yet unmentioned features pulled up from its $42,400 base Momentum T5 FWD trim include rain-sensing wipers, Road Sign Information (RSI), an auto-dimming centre mirror, a powered panoramic sunroof, a Clean Zone Air Quality system, a humidity sensor, rear parking sensors, a backup camera with active guidelines, voice recognition, two USB ports, Bluetooth connectivity with streaming audio, Volvo On-Call featuring remote start and vehicle tracking, a 170-watt 10-speaker audio system, Sirius/XM satellite radio, heatable front seats with aforementioned driver’s side memory, a 120-volt three-pronged household-style power outlet in the rear console, power-folding rear seat headrests, plus more on the inside, while the exterior features dual chromed tailpipes across the entire line, plus this model gets a special R-Design front grille, auto high beams and active bending for the LED headlamps, fog lamps with active bending, glossy black exterior trim (including the side mirror housings), puddle lamps under the door handles, proximity keyless entry, etcetera. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
Awesome surround camera was really helpful. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I particularly liked my test car’s beautiful coat of Fusion Red Metallic paint, an option well worth the extra $900. It’s one of five available colours and a single no-cost standard Black Stone hue, while all R-Design trimmed cars receive a Charcoal black interior theme. If you were to choose the base Momentum, the exterior paint selection grows to seven colours and available interior themes widen as well, while the Inscription upgrade gives you a choice of eight outer colours yet fewer cabin combinations, but take note the Momentum model’s upgradable upholstery options don’t cost anything at all when moving up to Inscription trim. 

The previously lauded 19-inch alloys were a $1,000 improvement by the way, while my tester’s additional options included a graphical head-up display that projected key info, such as route guidance directions, onto the windscreen for just $1,150; while its Bowers & Wilkins stereo came with 15 sensational speakers and 1,100 watts of over-lording power, making it a great way to spend $3,750. 

Additional extras included a Climate Package with heated Aquablades windshield wipers, a heatable steering wheel, and heated rear seats for $1,250; a Convenience Package sporting Volvo’s superb Pilot Assist semi-autonomous drive system, Adaptive Cruise Control, and a Homelink garage door opener plus compass integrated into the centre mirror for $1,500; and lastly a Vision Package incorporating a wonderfully useful 360-degree surround parking camera, easy-to-operate Park Assist Pilot semi-autonomous self parking, always appreciated front parking sensors, even more welcome auto-dimming power-retracting side mirrors, plus blindspot monitoring with rear cross traffic alert for $1,800. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
Love these Nappa leather-covered sport seats. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Those curious about the S60 Inscription should note that it includes almost all of the R-Design model’s features for just $53,900, except for the sporting items spoken of earlier in this review. Unique to this model is an elegant chrome waterfall-style front grille, bright metal window surrounds, special 10-spoke 18-inch alloys, gorgeous matte Driftwood Décor interior trim, a tailored dash top and instrument panel featuring more stitched soft padded surfaces than other models, whereas the seats are upholstered in rich perforated Nappa leather, and come ventilated up front. 

By the way, all pricing was pulled from right here at CarCostCanada, where you can also source individual trim, package, and standalone option pricing, plus rebate information and money-saving dealer invoice pricing that’s otherwise hard to get. 

Speaking of hard, the new S60 made it difficult to find anything to gripe about, but I would’ve appreciated somewhere to stow my sunglasses, and there wasn’t enough room on the lower console to rest my Samsung S9, which was likely part of this company’s safety-first plan from the onset, so I probably shouldn’t complain. I nevertheless placed it in one of the S60’s two cupholders, which are otherwise covered under a beautifully detailed retractable lid, with the other cupholder was amply large to securely hold a sizeable water bottle that almost never leaves my side. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
The rear seating area is more accommodating than its predecessor. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I should also note that the trunk, which at 391 litres (13.8 cubic feet) is average for this segment, was big enough for all of my daily gear, but its 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks only included a centre pass-through instead of a more accommodating 40/20/40 opening, so while I could probably fit a couple of sets of skinny skis through I wouldn’t be able to squeeze in a duo of fat powder boards or enough skis for four passengers. Still, even this narrow pass-through is a big improvement over most of its Japanese challengers that simply provide 60/40-split seatbacks with nary a centre slot to be seen at all. 

In summary, if you’re contemplating a car in the compact luxury D-segment you should seriously consider this all-new Volvo, as the S60 is now a commendable contender that provides attractive styling, serious performance, leading-edge technology, impressive safety, and a level of comfort that really needs to be experience to be appreciated. 

2019 Volvo S60 T6 AWD R-Design
I would’ve preferred a full 40/20/40 split instead of a centre pass-through. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

What’s more, the new S60 is totally unique in this class, which has to account for something, right? After all, who wants to be seen in a car that everyone else drives? I certainly appreciated not witnessing exact duplicates of my ride passing by day in and day out, and enjoyed the quick head-turns and positive smiles my S60 R-Design tester received throughout my test week. Truly, if I were in this market, I’d have a hard time turning this wonderful car down, but alas, like most everyone else these days I’m trying to decide between SUVs. What can I say? I’m a product of the times. If instead you’re into something more exclusive, check out this all-new Volvo S60. I highly recommend it. 

 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

Hot new 2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé unveiled

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
The new 2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé promises dramatic new styling on an already impressive performance SUV platform. (Photo: Porsche)

Ask anyone into cars which automaker makes the sportiest SUV, and Porsche will likely top the list more often than not. Whether we’re talking performance or styling, its Cayenne utility has long been considered one of the strongest performers in its mid-size luxury class, but that fact hasn’t stopped the German performance brand from producing an even sportier crossover model for 2020. Introducing the new Cayenne Coupé, a sharper more exciting version of the current Cayenne, designed to go head-to-head with the BMW X6s and Mercedes GLE Coupés of the world. 

Before the Cayenne arrived on the global luxury SUV scene in 2002, BMW’s X5 was touted as the sportiest premium utility. The Cayenne, particularly in Turbo form, trounced all over the X5’s turf, but BMW arguably returned to the topmost podium spot when the X6 Sports Activity Coupé arrived in 2007. 

With that sloped-back Bavarian SUV came a completely new niche market, solidified by the daringly different albeit mostly unloved (and therefore quickly cancelled) Acura ZDX in 2009, which was followed by the Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class Coupé in 2015, plus Lamborghini Urus in 2017 and Audi Q8 in 2018. 

The latter two models, together with the Audi Q7, Bentley Bentayga, and Volkswagen Touareg, ride on VW group’s MLBevo platform, which is why it was only a matter of time before this Cayenne Coupé joined the fray. This said it’s quite possible for the new Porsche to earn even greater success than its familial rivals and other key competitors that came before, thanks to Porsche’s revered name and the model’s expected performance. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
A new lower roofline with a sweptback rear hatch provides distinctive rear styling that sets the new Coupé apart from the regular Cayenne. (Photo: Porsche)

When compared to their regularly sized siblings, an obvious downfall of all SUV coupe competitors is practicality, the lower rooflines lending to less cargo capacity, and while this is as true of the Cayenne Coupé as it is with the X6 and more spacious X5, plenty of luxury car buyers not wanting a traditional family hauler are looking to this niche segment as a more pragmatic alternative to their current sport sedan or sports coupe. What’s more, the very existence of the new Cayenne Coupé allows Porsche to upsize future generations of the regular Cayenne, potentially even providing a three-row version to go up against the seven-passenger X5. 

Changes from the redesigned 2019 Cayenne (which will remain unchanged for 2020) and the new Cayenne Coupé include a 20-millimetre lower roofline, including a new windscreen held up by shallower A pillars, plus narrower more pointed rear side windows, revised second-row doors skins, brand new rear quarter panels, and a reworked rear bumper, that last component now including an integrated license plate cutout. The new bodywork has resulted in 19 millimetres of increased width, which when combined with the Coupé’s lower ride height makes for a more aggressive stance overall. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
Active aerodynamics are incorporated for the first time in this niche SUV coupe class. (Photo: Porsche)

Yet more Cayenne Coupé upgrades include a special adaptive rear deck lid spoiler, separated rear seats for a four-occupant total, plus two roof choices starting with a standard 2.16-cubic-metre fixed panoramic moonroof with sunshade, or an available carbon panel for an even sportier look. 

That adaptive rear spoiler will be a first for the SUV coupe market segment, following in the footsteps of its bigger Cayenne brother in its more traditional mid-size luxury SUV category. The regular Cayenne uses an adaptive rooftop spoiler for its top-tier Turbo trim, whereas the active aerodynamic device will be standard on the new Cayenne Coupé, expanding by 135 mm (5.3 inches) when it reaches speeds of 90 km/h and beyond. Additionally, a rooftop spoiler pushes airflow down the sloping rear glass combines towards the active spoiler on the rear deck lid, further aiding the Coupé’s aerodynamics. This system, called Porsche Active Aerodynamics (PAA), increases downforce on the rear axle to provide better handling dynamics, while also improving high-speed efficiency to minimize wind noise and reduce fuel consumption. 

By the way, the carbon roof mentioned earlier will require an upgrade to one of three lightweight sport packages, which also feature a number of Sport Design features, as well as unique 22-inch GT Design wheels, hounds-tooth Pepita checked fabric seat inserts that’ll send your memory back to classic 911s and 928s, plus carbon and microsuede-like Alcantara interior trim. What’s more, the new Cayenne Coupé Turbo includes a sport exhaust system as standard equipment. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
A lightweight carbon fibre roof is now optional. (Photo: Porsche)

The enhanced exhaust system connects through to the same twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 as found in the regular Cayenne Turbo, capable of 541 horsepower and 567 pound-feet of torque, resulting in standstill to 100km/h in just 3.9 seconds. This means the new Cayenne Coupé Turbo’s standing start will only be improved upon by the previously noted 650-horsepower Lamborghini Urus, which hits 100km/h in only 3.6 seconds, which leaves the 567-horsepower X6 M and 577-horsepower AMG-Mercedes GLE 63 S Coupé requiring 4.2 seconds each to accomplish the same 100km/h run. Notably the smaller compact AMG-Mercedes GLC 63 S Coupé charges from naught to 100km/h in a scant 3.8 seconds thanks to its 503-horsepower V8, while the 503-horsepower BMW X4 M needs 4.1 seconds to achieve the same speed. Those that dare live on the edge can tout bragging rights to a 286-km/h top speed for the Cayenne Coupé Turbo, incidentally. 

If ultimate speed isn’t your thing, and let’s face it, only those with a track nearby and enough time and money to rent it out for hot laps can take advantage without putting their license and new Cayenne Coupé Turbo in jeopardy, Porsche makes a less potent Cayenne Coupé available with an identical 335 horsepower turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 to the regular base Cayenne. This is where the new Audi Q8 fits into the scheme of things too, in case you were wondering, not to mention most of the above SUV coupes in their less formidable trims. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
The new Cayenne Coupé Turbo is one of the fastest entries in the SUV coupe segment. (Photo: Porsche)

The turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 engine makes a healthy 335 horsepower and 332 lb-ft of torque, which is good enough for a 6.0-second sprint from zero to 100km/h in standard guise or 5.9 seconds when upgraded with one of its lightweight sports packages. The Sport Chrono Package, incidentally, is standard equipment with the Cayenne Coupé, which brings up an interesting point. When the regular base Cayenne is upfitted with its Sport Chrono Package, Porsche estimates its sprint time to 100km/h as 5.9 seconds, which strangely makes it 0.1 seconds faster to 100km/h than the new Cayenne Coupé. Additionally, the base Cayenne’s terminal velocity is 2 km/h faster at 245 km/h, the entry-level Cayenne Coupé’s only capable of 243 km/h. Are we making a mountain out a mole hill? Of course we are, but splitting such hairs is par for the course when it comes to this high-end, super-performance SUV arena, so we have every right to. 

Back to standard equipment, the new Cayenne Coupé also gets speed-sensitive Power Steering Plus, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), plus a set of 20-inch alloy rims, all of which will cause you to spend more when purchasing a regular Cayenne. 

Now that we’re talking money, the new 2020 Cayenne Coupé will be available from just $86,400 when it goes on sale later this year, while the significantly quicker Cayenne Coupé Turbo will start at $148,000, plus freight and fees of course. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
The Cayenne Coupé’s instrument panel is identical to the newly revised 2019 Cayenne’s dash design. (Photo: Porsche)

In its transformation from regular SUV to coupe, the new model also gets eight-way powered sport seats with beefier side bolsters, while passengers in back sit on cushions lowered by 30 mm (1.18 inches), allowing additional headroom to compensate for the lower rear roofline. 

The Cayenne Coupé’s tapering roof negatively affects its load hauling ability too, but to be fair it’s only down by 145 litres (5.1 cubic feet) when compared to the normally sized Cayenne. To that end the base Coupé can manage up to 625 litres (22.0 cu ft) of gear behind its rear seats, whereas the bigger model is good for 770 litres (27.2 cu ft). When dropping the 40/20/40 split-folding rear row, luggage capacity increases to 1,540 litres (54.4 cu ft) compared to 1,710 litres (60.4 cu ft) in the regular Cayenne, which is a difference of only 170.0 litres (6.0 cu ft). Therefore, while not as practical as the regular Cayenne, the new Coupé should be just fine for those moving up from a sport coupe or sedan. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupé
The Cayenne Coupé is strictly a four-seater, with its middle position replaced by a centre console bin. (Photo: Porsche)

On that note, those considering moving over to the Cayenne Coupé from a second-generation Panamera will appreciate an extra 125 litres (4.4 cu ft) of cargo room when comparing base trims, while owners of the Panamera Sport Turismo will benefit by 105 litres (3.7 cu ft) of extra cargo volume. 

Also important to note, the Cayenne Turbo Coupé’s cargo hold is 25 litres (0.9 litres) smaller than the base Cayenne Coupé at just 600 litres (21.2 cu ft) when the rear seats are in use, or by 30 litres (1.0 cu-ft) to 1,510 litres (53.3 cu ft) when they’re laid flat. 

The all-new 2020 Cayenne Coupé will arrive across Canada this fall, but is available to preorder from your local Porsche retailer now.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

The Dealer Paid What? Everything You Need to Know about Dealer Invoice Pricing!

Whether you are purchasing your first vehicle or looking to make a well-deserved upgrade, the thought of a new vehicle can meet you with much elation. When purchasing a new vehicle, there are a plethora of factors to consider: make, model, colour, add-ons, packages, and the one factor many people look at first – price. Most people have a vehicle in mind, but more often than not, the price is the determining factor when deciding whether or not to go ahead with their purchase. Some will try their best to negotiate with the dealership, but doing so can be tricky, time-consuming, and produce lackluster results.

 

The price the dealer shows you is the MSRP (manufacturers suggested retail price) of the vehicle, which, as the name suggests, is the recommended price a dealer should charge a consumer for the vehicle. There are ways, however, to lower this cost whether you plan to lease, finance or purchase a vehicle outright. The Dealer Invoice Report can help you save a significant amount of money on your new vehicle purchase without having to practice your best negotiating skills for hours on end.

 

What is a dealer invoice?

 

A dealer invoice, also referred to as the “dealers cost”, is the price the dealer pays the manufacturer for the vehicle. This price is often lower than the MSRP to allow room for maximum profit for the dealer. For example, the dealer cost of a vehicle could be $30,000; in which the dealer pays said amount to the manufacturer. The dealer will then work with the automakers to determine the MSRP – or “sticker value” –  of the vehicle which more often than not, is higher than the dealers cost. The car could then be put on the market for $35,000 for example, which is the price the consumer would pay for the vehicle.

 

How can a dealer invoice report help me save money on my vehicle?

 

A dealer invoice report gives you a detailed breakdown of the dealer cost of the vehicle as well as various incentives that can help you save on your new vehicle purchase. For example, if you are looking to finance a new 2019 vehicle, the dealer invoice report will breakdown the monthly payments in accordance with the dealer price of the vehicle. The report also contains discounts, such as dealer cash incentives, that the dealer may not tell you.

 

How do I fill out a dealer invoice report?

 

Filling out a dealer invoice report is a simple process that can be done online (no need to head to the dealer to do this!).

 

  1. Log in to your account (or create one easily via email or Facebook)
  2. Pick your desired car make
  3. Pick your desired model under the make. It’s important to pick the EXACT make you would like. For example, if you are looking for a new Mazda GT, the model comes in both FWD (front-wheel-drive) and AWD (all-wheel-drive); both possessing different price tags. Ensure you pick the exact model you would like.
  4. Review your report + savings
  5. Bring the report to the dealer to obtain the savings outlined in your report

 

What information can I find on my Dealer Invoice Report?

 

Your dealer invoice report will give you a vast amount of information pertaining to your vehicle of interested. Including, but not limited to:

 

  • Invoice Price (dealer cost) of the vehicle
  • Pricing Guidance; how to calculate the best deal for your vehicle of choice based on the invoice price plus any incentives you may be eligible for
  • Factory Incentives; discounts made available via the manufacturer (eligibility may vary)
  • Lease and finance rates
  • Recommended Dealership; recognized dealerships within an appropriate distance that work with CarCostCanada members to help them save the most money possible
  • Vehicle Pricing and Options Details; a detailed breakdown of the costs pertaining to the vehicle in relevance to the base and/or any features/add-ons
  • Comparable Vehicles; vehicles that boast similar features and pricing in accordance with the subject vehicle
  • Standard Features; a detailed breakdown of the subject vehicle

 

How much money can a Dealer Invoice Report actually save me?

 

The savings depend on the make, model, and year of the vehicle, as well as any current incentives offered by the manufacturer and the original cost. Typically, members report savings in the thousands. For example, a 2019 Honda CR-V EX-L AWD has an MSRP of $38,285 and a dealer invoice price of $35,659; savings of over $2,500! Some makes and models will have fewer savings, whilst others may boast even more.

 

Another key component when it comes to saving money with your dealer invoice report is the incentives. The report outlines any incentives that are made available through the manufacturer. These could amount to significant savings on top of the savings from the dealer cost. It’s important to note that a majority of incentives require eligibility which should be discussed with the dealer at the time of the purchase.

 

What is the cost of a Dealer Invoice Report?

 

The first Dealer Invoice Report is free for Car Cost Canada members!

 

 

Will the dealer accept my Dealer Invoice Report?

 

We work with a surfeit of dealers who are more than happy to help you save money on your purchase so you can walk away happy. Within the report, we provide a recommended dealership that works in harmony with CCC to provide you with exceptional service and pricing. Should you choose another dealer, no issues should arise. Most dealers are happy to work with you and your report as the sale of a vehicle is beneficial for them as well. Some dealers, however, may push back and try to negotiate on the MSRP with you, despite your possession of the dealer cost. If a dealer is unwilling to accept your report, which is a rare feat, don’t despair; there are many dealers willing to help you save your hard-earned money.

 

What are my vehicle exceptions when it comes to my Dealer Invoice Report?

 

We work with several automakers, so your choices are plenty! The automakers we partner up with provide deals on the newest models available on the market; last, current, and upcoming year. Our report can help you save money on the most recent models your make of choice has to offer. Here is a list of automakers we work with!

 

 

Buying a new vehicle is a rewarding milestone; whether you have finally saved up for your first vehicle or you are ready to take the leap and put yourself in something more luxurious. Purchasing a vehicle is a huge step and the ability to save money on your new vehicle makes the process that much more rewarding.

 

Ready to get behind the wheel of a new ride? Contact us today and save your hard earned money on the car of your dreams!

 

Lease? Finance? Buy Outright? What’s the Best Way for ME to Buy a Car?

A vehicle is one of the largest purchases one makes, ergo, a significant amount of research should go into every aspect. From the make/model you have your heart set on to interior features to the total price of the vehicle; there are many factors that contribute to building, pricing, and purchasing the best vehicle for your needs. Because vehicles are a large investment, dealers, and banks alike, offer various payment options to suit your lifestyle. Leasing, financing, or purchasing a vehicle outright are the methods offered by the dealers when it comes to payment. Figuring out how you want to proceed with pricing will help you get that much further in purchasing your desired vehicle. Our Dealer Invoice Report can also help you ensure that, no matter what payment method you choose, you are getting the best deal on a new vehicle that Canada has to offer!

 

What are the differences between leasing, financing, and purchasing a vehicle outright?

 

All of these methods vary significantly to help suit the needs of as many individuals as possible. The key differences pertain to ownership of the vehicle and term payments.

 

Financing; albeit, the most popular means of paying for a vehicle, financing offers a good level of flexibility. Financing encompasses paying for the total price of the vehicle in denominations over a selected term. By the end of the financing term, you have complete ownership of the vehicle.

 

Leasing; leasing is a popular option for those who like to upgrade their vehicles frequently and aren’t doing copious amounts of driving. Similar to financing, leasing requires weekly, bi-weekly or monthly payments owing to the balance of the total lease. The main difference between financing and leasing is ownership; when leasing, you do not own the vehicle.

 

Buying outright; buying a vehicle outright is not as common as leasing or financing and is typically done when the cost or age of the vehicle does not meet the requirements of leasing/financing (more specifically, used vehicles). Although purchasing a brand new vehicle outright is not done as much as financing or leasing, it is the easiest method of payment as a surfeit of background checks (credit, employment, etc) are usually not required.

 

Is it a good idea to buy a car on finance?

 

As mentioned previously, financing is the most popular method of purchasing a vehicle. Financing a vehicle possesses the best attributes of leasing and buying outright, simultaneously; owning the vehicle whilst being able to pay in smaller sums. If you are planning on keeping your vehicle long-term, do a significant amount of driving, and don’t have the cash to pay in full (or the desire to part with such a hefty amount of money in one shot), financing is a viable option for you. Financing a vehicle also allows for more leeway when adding features to your vehicle. For example, if you wanted to add a sunroof to your vehicle, it could run you anywhere from $500-$2,000, however, when financing, you can discuss adding this feature to your vehicle at the time of purchase and break apart the cost. Instead of paying thousands outright, the cost of the upgrade is spread across your term, ergo, your sunroof will cost you a few extra bucks a month.

 

It’s important to note that financing comes with an interest rate contingent on your credit score, thus, you will be paying more for the vehicle that you would if you were buying outright. If you have excellent credit, expect interest rates to be on the lower, however, if you have poor or no credit, you could be paying upwards of 30%. It’s important to review your score to see what interest rate category you fall into. Our Dealer Invoice Report also aids with financing to help you get the lowest interest rate possible for your individual situation.

 

How does financing work? Financing can be a relatively easy process provided you have all the key information you need. The dealer will show you various payment terms based on the vehicle of your choice; the longer the term, the lower the weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly payments and vice versa. A typical term is 5 years or 60 months, but can be shorter or longer depending on your financial state and the year/make of the vehicle. The dealer will then require your financial information (credit score, credit history, letter of employment) and determine your interest rate based on these factors. Once the term, payments, and interest rates are worked out, you can opt to add any upgrades. When you obtain the vehicle, you are required to make your payments until the term is over, however, at any point, you can contribute money to lessen the term period or monthly payments. Giving a down payment can also lessen the monthly payments.

 

Pros

  • Payment terms and prices are flexible; you can opt for a longer term with cheaper payments or a shorter term with higher payments depending on your preference
  • Allows you to get a higher priced vehicle, if desired, without having to fork out a lump sum of cash
  • Upgrades can be added for low monthly payments

 

Cons

  • You are locked into a contract and failure to pay could lead to the loss of your vehicle
  • Loans typically come from the bank, meaning you are taking on a debt
  • The interest rate is added onto the full cost of the vehicle, depending on your credit score, it could amount to a significant increase in cost

 

Is it a good idea to lease a car?

 

Leasing is not as popular as financing a vehicle, but it does pose a lot of benefits. Similar to financing, leasing requires weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly payment for a fixed term, however, you are not the owner of the vehicle. You will be required to turn over the vehicle at the end of the lease or in some cases, the dealer may offer incentives for purchasing it post-lease. Leasing is a viable option for those who like to upgrade vehicles frequently as you are not fully committed to the vehicle. Most people lease for a 1-3 year period and upgrade thereafter.

 

If you are a city dweller and don’t typically do a lot of driving, leasing is a good option to consider. When leasing a vehicle, you are given a set amount of kilometres per year (extra charges apply should you go over) – if you do a small amount of driving, this shouldn’t be an issue. If there are any problems with the vehicle, they are typically covered by the dealer leasing you the vehicle (restrictions apply).

 

How does leasing work? Just like financing, the dealer works with you to find a term and payment plan based on your financial state and your desired vehicle. The cost is calculated based on the time frame and predictive depreciation of the vehicle; for example, if your lease term is 3 years and the car is expected to depreciate by 30% over the next 3 years, you will be paying for 70% of the vehicles total cost. Once your lease is over, you can opt to lease another vehicle or work with the dealer to purchase the vehicle you have been leasing at a lower cost.

 

Pros

  • You can upgrade your vehicle regularly without having to purchase in full
  • The rates are typically cheaper than those pertaining to financing
  • You don’t have to worry about selling/trading a vehicle when you are done with it

 

Cons

  • You do not own the vehicle, meaning you have to be especially cautious
  • You are given a fixed amount of KMs and if you go over them, the costs are high
  • Most leases aren’t offered past 3 years, meaning you have to commit to upgrading or purchase a vehicle thereafter

 

Is it a good idea to buy a vehicle outright?

 

Purchasing a vehicle outright is the most straightforward and easiest process out of the three, however, the issue with this is evident – if you don’t have the cash, you cannot buy the vehicle. Buying a vehicle outright minimizes the need for extensive paperwork (obtaining employment information, credit history, etc). Because you are not borrowing the money, the dealer is under the assumption that you accept the responsibility for the full payment, thus, credit history and other financial information is not required.

 

Purchasing a vehicle outright allows you to forego interest payments which will save you money in the long run. Our Dealer Invoice Report also contains cash incentives that can lower the price of the vehicle even more. Most dealers will accept our cash incentives with no issues because they are guaranteed to be paid on the sale. If you have the means to pay for a vehicle outright and don’t want to be locked into a debt/contract, consider doing so.

 

How does purchasing a vehicle outright work? This is the simplest of the methods and doesn’t require much. Discuss the model/make of the vehicle you want and bring forth any cash incentives you are eligible for. The dealer will then work out the best possible price, factoring your Dealer Invoice Report, incentives, desired add-ons, warranty, and taxes. Once you sign and make the payment, the vehicle is yours!

 

Pros

  • You are not locked into a contract nor do you acquire a debt
  • You forego the interest rates that come with financing
  • You fully own the vehicle; there is no worry about not being able to make the payments as there are none associated with the physical cost of the vehicle

 

Cons

  • Most new vehicles cost tens of thousands of dollars which can be difficult to pay all at once. You have to ensure you, not only have the funds to pay the full cost but doing so will also not leave you with nothing
  • If you want any add-ons or upgrades, these will have to be paid in full as well, either at the time of purchase thereafter
  • You are responsible for selling or trading the vehicle if/when you decide to do so

 

Deciding how you want to go about paying for your vehicle is contingent on your desire to own, your current financial state and how much you drive. Regardless of whether you want to lease, finance, or purchase outright, our Dealer Invoice Report can help you save thousands on your new vehicle!

 

Have you found the vehicle of your dreams? Contact us today and save big on the car YOU want!

Go the Distance: Get 300,000+ Kilometres With These Impressive 2019 Cars!

You’d agree with us when we say that the automotive industry sees plenty of action every year. With so many new models hitting the market, car enthusiasts aren’t easily impressed. It’s 2019, and the people want, nay, deserve more.

 

Kilometres Matter, Right?

Car comparison in Canada has become trickier and trickier owing to the staggering competition. Earlier, if your car could make it to 160,000 kilometres, it was a worthy opponent. Much has changed. That threshold has risen quite some and drivers now expect their cars to deliver 300,000 kilometres and beyond!

There are a couple of factors that determine how much kilometrage a car affords its driver. Every year, several websites list the most reliable cars based on their performances. The parameters that are considered are the car’s ability to withstand daily wear and tear, harsh climatic conditions and the driver’s skill, and still have plenty of kilometrages left over.

This begs the question: Do kilometres on a car really matter? KM is an important factor that shouldn’t be overlooked. The average annual kilometrage of a car is 20,000. You can look at this number as either high or low depending on the car’s age. Don’t get too tempted by the km/gal alone though as there are several other measures of a car’s efficiency!

What car has the most kilometres in it? As far as record-breaking cars go, a two-door Volvo Coupe purchased in 1966 takes the cake. It provided its owner with about 4,800,000 kms!

 

2019 Cars That Offer 300,000+ Kms

On average, about 1.2% of cars that are manufactured every year make it to 300,000 kilometres. Which models live up to this statistic? We’re about to find out!

 

Honda Odyssey

The fifth-generation Honda Odyssey has upped the ante as far as its overall performance is concerned. A sleek cabin, Magic Slide second-row seats, increased comfort and connectivity all come together to create a minivan masterpiece. The 3.5-liter V6 engine is a force to be reckoned with. It offers 32 HP more than its predecessor and has improved fuel economy.

iSeeCars.com has listed the Odyssey in its list of the top 14 vehicles that have an impressive lifespan. In fact, 2.3% of all Honda Odysseys were driven for 300,000+ kms and counting.

 

Toyota Avalon

By its own admission, the 2019 Toyota Avalon combines state-of-the-art technology with thrilling designs, offering both driver and passenger a luxurious feel. Toyota’s flagship sedan has come a long way since its inception. It is powered by a 3.5-liter V6 engine that is infused with a 6-speed transmission.

Apart from its big and comfortable interiors, the best part is yet to come. About 2.6% of all registered Avalons broke the 300,000-km threshold.

 

Toyota Tacoma

Toyota conceptualized the sleek and sporty Tacoma for the adventure-seeking junkie. Even at first glance, it’s hard to miss the sculpted bumper, colour-keyed fender flares, and the athletic hood scoop.

The Tacoma was built to take on the most rugged terrain. With the TRD Pro Series, you can expect a 278-HP V6 engine with a five-passenger double cab.

If you’re a buyer with modest needs and a strict budget, the Toyota Tacoma was made for you! It also doubles up as a sports truck for off-roaders. 2.5% of all tested Tacoma cars ran for well over 300,000 kms.

 

2019 Cars That Offer 400,000+ Kms

The following vehicles not only cruised past the 400,000-km mark, but they also proved themselves to last the longest and provide the most reliable performance. Take a look at these formidable frontrunners!

 

Honda Civic

When we talk of staying power, we’re talking about the immortal Honda Civic (at least if revenue figures are anything to go by)! This compact vehicle was listed as the longest-lasting model in a 2015 Consumer Report.

With a Civic, the two things you can always bank on are fuel economy and reliability. This is probably what made the car a best-seller in North America and keeps sales figures on the up and up even in 2019. Owners can easily enjoy 10+years of uninterrupted performance and, dare we say it, hit 400,0000 km and more.

 

Chevrolet Silverado 1500

This pickup is a threat to Ford’s F-150 series and provides owners with superior comfort and durability. These rival automakers are constantly attempting to outdo each other, and this definitely shows as both companies’ sales figures are on a tremendous upswing. According to the latest iSeeCars report, you can definitely count on your Silverado to cross 400,000 km.

Luxurious interiors are mated with alluring exteriors to make the Silverado one of the most resilient vehicles on the road. It can take on all types of terrain and still have plenty of life in it.

 

Toyota Highlander

The Toyota Highlander comes with a plethora of benefits. Its roomy interiors seat eight people and have third-row reclining seats. Cargo space is in no short supply as the 60/40 third-row seat can fold flat to recline and accommodate any extra luggage. Noise penetration is kept to a minimum as the windshield is made from an acoustic-proof glass that prevents outside sounds from entering the cabin.

These features sure pack a punch, but there’s more! The Hybrid SUV leads the pack of vehicles that last for a decade or longer. They have rock solid reliability rates and the advantage of being backed by a very powerful brand. If you take good care of your Highlander, it can easily outdo 400,000 km.

 

The Journey of a Thousand Miles Begins With a Car Dealer Invoice Report!

Request a FREE Dealer Invoice Report. SAVE Thousands of Dollars on Your Next Car!

A dealer invoice report will reveal the vehicle’s MSRP so that you can negotiate for a great deal. When shopping through Car Cost Canada, you can also access certified dealerships, exclusive rebates, and incentives. Skip those deceptive dealer fees.

It all starts when you get your dealer invoice report.

 

Thanks for reading! Kindly note that the numbers provided above were taken from the manufacturer’s website and are contingent on the driver’s behaviour. They are not guaranteed by CCC.

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD Road Test

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The Rogue has maintained its styling since its 2017 mid-cycle makeover, but it still looks good. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

It’s déjà vu all over again, or at least that’s how I felt when picking up my 2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum AWD tester. I’d spent a week with an identical model less than a year prior; even down to its top-line trim level and most popular Pearl White paint. 

Then I got inside, however, and was reminded of a near identical model I test drove the year prior in lovely Scarlet Ember livery, and therefore also remembered that last year’s SL Platinum wasn’t fully loaded, missing this SUV’s $500 SL Platinum Reserve Interior Package that includes a stylish stitched leatherette dash pad and replaces the regular Charcoal black or Almond beige leather upholstery with special quilted leather in an even richer looking Premium Tan hue, which comes across more like caramel or saddle brown. Either way it looks great, and ideally complements the white exterior paint, although the upgrade package is no longer available with the special metallic red exterior paint, or for that matter Nissan’s beautiful Caspian Blue. A shame. 

Not to start this review out on a negative, because there’s very little to fault this popular compact crossover SUV on. As noted, the Rogue is Nissan Canada’s most popular model, and one look should make it easy to understand why. It was refreshed for the 2017 model year with Nissan’s wider, more U-shaped Vmotion 2.0 grille that I happen to like a lot more than the original V, while its then-new quad-beam headlamps with LED daytime running lights, and its updated LED brake lights added premium-level sophistication to the design. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Looking right at home in nature, the little crossover SUV makes a good companion for summer camping trips and winter getaways. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

That face-lifted 2017 model included additional styling tweaks on the outside plus updates within, a personal favourite being its flat-bottom steering wheel that still makes a sporty statement in the otherwise elegantly appointed top-line 2019 Rogue SL Platinum Reserve model. So equipped, that steering wheel is leather-wrapped with a heatable rim, a much appreciated mid-winter feature, as are the Quick Comfort heated front seats that come standard across the entire Rogue line, albeit the Platinum’s perforated leather upholstery is exclusive to this model. 

There’s actually more to the SL Platinum Reserve Interior’s seat design than quilting and the caramel colour change. The quilting is only used for the centre inserts, with perforated leather added to the inner bolsters and contrast-stitched black leather on top of those bolsters for a little more of a sport look mixed in with the luxury. The seats’ upholstery is complemented by the same Premium Tan on the door armrests, centre armrest, padded knee protectors on each side of the lower centre console, and even the aforementioned dash facing, which incorporates a similarly classy looking stitched leatherette pad ahead of the front passenger. 

Icing on the proverbial cake comes in the form of Piano Black interior door inlays surrounding the usual chromed door handles, which match up nicely next to the same glossy black treatment rimming the dash vents, centre console, gear lever surround and otherwise leather-wrapped shift knob. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Large machine-finished 19-inch alloys are exclusive to SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

As you may have guessed, the latest Rogue SL Platinum Reserve doesn’t just look like a premium crossover SUV, but in addition its standard feature set is replete with top-drawer gear that one-ups plenty of luxury brands. For instance, the official name given to this trim level is Rogue SL Platinum with ProPilot Assist, the latter technology standard with all SL Platinum models and really quite impressive. It’s a semi-autonomous “hands-on-wheel” driving system, which means it has the ability to completely drive itself, but due to safety concerns only lets you remove your hands from the steering wheel for about eight seconds at a time—it warns you to put your hands back on the wheel after that. Still, it’ll impress your friends and might be useful to those who find highway driving intimidating, as it helps keep the Rogue centered within its lane and, along with its Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Intelligent Lane Intervention systems, may even help avoid an accident. 

These latter two advanced driver assistance systems get pulled up to the SL Platinum from mid-range SV trim, as does Intelligent emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and adaptive cruise control, while high beam assist, rear parking sensors, Moving Object Detection (MOD), backup collision intervention and rear autonomous emergency braking join ProPilot Assist as options with the SV and standard equipment with the top-line SL Platinum model. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The optional SL Platinum Reserve package replaces the usual black or beige interior colour scheme with this saddle brown motif. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with all the usual active and passive safety features, some advanced tech incorporated into upper trims from the base Rogue S include Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) with a display showing individual tire pressures and an Easy-Fill Tire Alert, Intelligent Forward Collision Warning (FCW), Intelligent Emergency Braking (IEB), plus two features normally relegated to top-line trims, Blind Spot Warning (BSW) with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), while Rear Door Alert is an oddly named albeit very welcome feature that actually warns against leaving something or someone in the back seat unattended after turning off the engine, by remembering that you opened a rear door before setting off on your drive. Now that’s smart. 

As cool as some of this tech is, especially watching the Rogue drive itself, applying hands to said wheel while on the highway, and then winding through some twisting backroads after tooling through town is my usual course of action. As always the Rogue didn’t disappoint, but let me insert a caveat here, I’ve never set my performance expectations too high. This is an SUV built primarily for comfort rather than all-out speed, and to that end it delivers in spades, with a nice compliant ride, smooth, progressive acceleration, and an easy, controlled demeanor on the open freeway. It can manage curves too, and provides strong braking when needed, but if you’re looking for performance there are sportier SUVs in this class, yet few are smoother than the Rogue, such refinement its specialty. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Navigation comes standard in SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Behind that V-motion grille is the Nissan’s dependable 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine, which continues to make a totally acceptable if not breathtaking 170 horsepower and 175 lb-ft of torque, while its standard continuously variable transmission (CVT) is one of the reasons behind that just noted smooth factor. It’s also partially responsible for the Rogue’s commendable Transport Canada fuel economy rating that comes in at 9.6 L/100km in the city, 7.5 on the highway and 8.7 combined with its as-tested all-wheel drivetrain, or 9.1 city, 7.1 highway and 8.2 combined when opting for front-wheel drive. 

As is mostly the case in this class, all-wheel drive is more about tackling slippery pavement than anything off-road, although traveling to campsites over logging roads or light-duty trails can benefit from AWD, as well as its various electronic all-weather features, such as Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) with Traction Control System (TCS). This said others in the class are starting to broaden their appeal, with the latest RAV4 Trail featuring some real 4×4-like go-anywhere technologies, and the Subaru Forester long offering its X-Mode for extracting itself from rougher situations. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Like the majority of Nissans, the Rogue uses a smooth operating CVT for “shifting gears”. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Back to earth, or rather asphalt, the Rogue is ideal for slogging through Canadian winters, hitting the slopes, or alternatively heading out on that summer camping vacation. It can tow a small camp trailer or lightweight boat weighing up to 500 kilos (1,100 lbs), plus it can carry plenty of gear in back, up to 1,112 litres (39.3 cubic feet) in the dedicated cargo area and 1,982 litres (70.0 cubic feet) when its 60/40-split rear seatbacks are folded flat. That rear bench is made more passenger and cargo friendly via a centre pass-through that doubles as a centre armrest with cupholders, which allows longer items like skis to be stuffed down the middle while rear passengers enjoy the benefit of the window seats, although take note they might be grumbling on the way back from the ski hill due to a surprising lack of available rear seat heaters. 

Along with all of the features already mentioned, the $37,398 top-line SL Platinum gets a lot of premium-level upgrades that really make a difference when it comes to performance, safety, convenience and luxury, such as AWD, 19-inch alloy wheels, LED headlamps, an electromechanical parking brake, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a heated leather steering wheel rim and leather-wrapped shift knob, memory for the six-way powered driver’s seat and side mirrors, a four-way powered front passenger’s seat, a powered panoramic sunroof, dual-zone automatic climate control, navigation, a surround parking monitor, great sounding Bose audio with nine speakers including two subs, Radio Data System (RDS) and speed-sensitive volume control, a gesture activated liftgate, and more. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Rear seating and storage is accommodating. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I won’t tire you by scrolling through lists of everything that gets pulled up to SL Platinum trim from the other two grades, but some highlights from both include remote engine start, proximity-sensing access with pushbutton ignition, auto on/off headlights, fog lamps, LED turn signals within the side mirror caps, roof rails, the aforementioned six-way powered driver’s seat with power lumbar, a retractable cargo cover and more with the $29,098 SV, plus variable intermittent wipers, overhead LED map lights and sunglasses storage, a colour multi-information display, a 7.0-inch centre touchscreen, NissanConnect featuring Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, SiriusXM Traffic, hands-free text messaging assistant, Bluetooth, mood lighting, and more with the $26,798 base Rogue S. Incidentally, all pricing was sourced right here on CarCostCanada, where all the trims, packages and individual features are itemized, plus otherwise hard to find rebate info and dealer invoice pricing is provided. 

For the most part our 2019 Rogue SL Platinum Reserve was well equipped, especially when it came to advanced driver assistance systems, plus it provided more than enough performance, a smooth, quiet ride, great fuel economy, and a fairly luxurious and comfortable cabin, while it was extremely accommodating for driver, passengers and cargo. I like the way it looks, especially as my tester was kitted out, which, along with all of the above, is likely why it’s such a strong seller, and also why it’s easy to recommend.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay

Watch how Porsche Adaptive Aerodynamics enhance 2020 911’s performance (video)

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S
The new 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera uses adaptive aerodynamics, including an active rear spoiler, to improve safety while adding speed and all-weather grip. (Photo: Porsche)

Who isn’t excited to see the new 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera on the road, let alone experience one first hand? While the latest sports car of sports cars might look to some like a mild makeover of a classic design, it’s a radical departure to those who live and breathe Porsche. 

Most applaud its fresh new styling, although some have criticized its backside when its attractively tapered deck lid transforms into a rather unorthodox rear wing, but no matter how much you like or dislike the car’s design, the method behind Porsche’s madness is hard to argue against. 

Less noticeable than the protruding rear wing are a set of active shutters that hide within the front corner grilles, which open above 70 km/h to minimize aerodynamic drag, while at 90 km/h the just noted rear spoiler gets raised into its most fuel efficient Eco position to once again reduce air resistance, although the aero system’s purpose changes from eco stewardship to maximum speed and grip at 170 km/h, when the front shutters open and the rear spoiler moves farther upward into its Performance position. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S
The rear wing moves into three different angles, depending on need. (Photo: Porsche)

What’s more, as part of this Performance position the PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) sport chassis automatically drops down by 10 millimetres in order to improve its aero efficiency further, this sole feature adding four seconds per lap to the 911’s Nürburgring performance. 

The 911’s adaptive aero also adjusts for new Wet mode, plus the active rear spoiler will literally spring into action when emergency braking is needed by automatically canting farther upward into its “Air Brake” mode, adding downward pressure over the rear wheels for greater braking grip. 

How does it work? Like the previous 911, the new model’s sculpted body panels provide precise paths for oncoming air to flow overtop, underneath and around the entire car so as to minimize drag and maximize downforce, a balancing act that’s always challenging to perfect, but the new 911’s adaptive aerodynamics take it a step further by letting that air vent into the front corner intakes, pass through each radiator, and then flow around the front wheels like an air curtain in order to reduce turbulence. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S
When the active air shutters are closed, air moves around the car as shown, and when open, air moves through the front intakes. (Photo: Porsche)

This airflow continues along the 911’s doors before moving up and over the rear fenders into the engine vents mounted below the rear window, which feeds the 3.0-litre, twin-turbocharged horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine’s new air-to-air intercoolers, after which it gets directed down and out rear vents at each side of the back bumper. 

For a more visual insight, make sure to watch the video provided by Porsche below, and don’t forget to check out the photo gallery above, where we’ve included some close up shots of the rear wing as well as some illustrations of frontal and rear airflow.

The Porsche 911 – Adaptive Aerodynamics (2:56):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR Road Test

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Tell me that the Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR isn’t gorgeous. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

I’m not going to lie to you. As curious as I am to spend a given week with seriously important big market cars like the recently redesigned Toyota Corolla, and as interested as I am to find out how far I can go on a single charge with Kia’s latest Soul EV, nothing gets me out of my editor’s chair as quickly or as enthusiastically as a hopped up muscle car, a high-revving super-exotic, or something along the lines of Jaguar’s F-Type SVR, which might be the perfect combination of both. 

Regular readers will remember that I spent a blissful week with this very same car last year in its more eye-arresting Ultra Blue paintwork, so having this 2019 model gifted to me for yet another seven heavenly days was a welcome surprise made better due to its stealth Santorini Black bodywork that thankfully doesn’t attract quite as much attention. 

It’s not that I was embarrassed to be seen in it, quite the opposite of course, but rather that this car coaxes my most juvenile impulses from their hardly deep recesses all too easily, which can quickly get a person deep into trouble. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
What can we say? Simply stunning. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

How quickly? Well that depends on whether you’re thrown into a stupor or moved into action when first laying eyes on the F-Type SVR, as well as which sense moves you most. If you’re visually stimulated first and foremost, you might be stopped dead in your tracks as soon as it comes into view, but then again if your receptors respond more to an auditory trigger you’ll move right past first sight to initial startup, resulting in the rasp of one of the more sensational exhaust notes in autodom, which will either send you to the moon in a momentary daze or turn you toward the street to put some of that wound up energy to good use. 

I’m jaded, or maybe it’s just that experience tells me not to waste a moment gawking inanely at something I can relive later in pictures. Certainly one can recall memories of moments well spent, but the more one collects such moments makes recalling them a helluvalot easier. A quick glance of appreciation, out of respect, immediately followed by a quicker descent into a familiar body hug, the SVR’s performance seats are as wholly enveloping as they’re sinfully comfortable. Foot on brake pedal, finger on start button, mechanical machinations ignited and ahhh… glory hallelujah! What a sound! 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
We’re loving the finely crafted details. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Nothing roadworthy this side of an XJR-15 sounds as brutally raw, as purely visceral as an F-Type SVR being brought to life, that is until you’ve given the throttle a few more blips after opening up its two-mode titanium and Inconel active exhaust system via a wee little console-mounted button that makes a great big noise. Any sort of right foot twitch capable of spinning the crank above 4,000 revolutions per minute lets loose a cacophony of crackling barks and blats, the kind of song that’ll have gearheads singing along in dissonant unity, and zero emissions folks sneering. 

Allowing spent gases to exit more freely isn’t exactly the Tesla mantra, and to think the minds behind this wondrous high-test glutton are the very crew responsible for the Model X-beating I-Pace (well, it beats the entry-level Tesla crossover, at least). We’ve all got to love the bizarre dichotomy running rampant in today’s automotive market, where the cars we all lust after are paying for the ones that government mandates are forcing down our throats. 

Of course, thanks to companies like Jaguar and Tesla we’re all beginning to realize that going electric isn’t the end of motorized fun, but potentially a new beginning. Could there be an electrified F-Type in our future? Likely, and it’ll be the quickest Jaguar sports car ever. Still, the good folks at Castle Bromwich will need to expend terahertz levels of energy in their artificial sound lab to recreate the auditory ecstasy this SVR composes. Let’s hope they succeed, because we all know that as sensational as this 5.0-litre supercharged V8 sounds, and as fabulously fast as this Jaguar becomes when powered by it, the still impressive yet nevertheless 23-year-old AJ-8 power unit’s days are numbered. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Richly attired and it fits like a glove, the F-Type SVR delivers big in performance luxury. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As it is, this 575 horsepower beast catapults from naught to 100km/h in just 3.7 seconds before attaining the seemingly unattainable terminal velocity of 322 km/h (200 mph)—that’s 1.1 seconds quicker and 122 km/h (75.8 mph) faster than the I-Pace, in case you were wondering. Certainly a driver’s license would be unobtainable for the remainder of my sorry life if I were so foolish as to attempt the former speed on public roads, and being that no such track is long enough within close proximity of my home we’ll all just need to take Jaguar’s word for it. Suffice to say that zero to all other cars at the stoplight looking like tiny coloured dots happens all of a shockingly sudden, so you’d better gather your stunned thoughts, get into the game and prepare for upcoming corners or you’ll fast be shuffled off this mortal coil. 

Fortunately the F-Type SVR manages all roads serpentine as easily as it’s guided down the straight and narrow, its brilliantly quick-shifting eight-speed automatic as ideally suited to flicking up through the gears as for rev-matched downshifts. Remember when I mentioned muscle car credentials earlier? That was strictly referencing the engine, its prowess over undulating, curving backroads the stuff of mid-engine exotica. Just look at the meaty 305-section Pirelli P-Zero rubber at back and plentiful 265/35s up front, both ends supported by the lightweight aluminum chassis and riveted, bonded body shell noted earlier, and then factor in that suspension’s Adaptive Dynamics system, the electronic active rear differential, and the brake-sourced torque vectoring. Tap the carbon ceramic brakes to load up the front tires, enter the apex, add throttle and enjoy as the SVR’s backside locks into place while catapulting this leather-lined beast toward the next bend, a process I repeated over and over, as often as opportunity would allow. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
All F-Types get a new 10-inch touchscreen for 2019. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All said, you’d think something as fabulously fast as the F-Type SVR would be a handful around town, but that’s where its exotic nature ends and more upright practicality enters. It’s actually a very comfortable coupe to spend time in, while visibility is quite good considering its sleek greenhouse and thick C pillars. The 12-way powered driver’s seat and steering column fit my long-legged, short torso five-foot-eight frame well, and due to much more movement in all directions should provide good adjustability for all sorts of body types, and I certainly had no complaints from my various co-drivers. 

On the practicality question, Jaguar provides a large hatch opening for loading in all kinds of gear, with up to 408 litres (14.4 cubic feet) in total and about half that below the removable hard cargo cover. It’s beautifully finished, as one would expect in this class, but remember that unlike the old XK the F-Type is strictly a two-seater with no rear seats to fold, so there’s no way you’ll be able to fit skis or any other long items aboard, unless you slot them down the middle between driver and front passenger. 

I remember stuffing my significant other and kids into an XKR coupe years ago, and while its 2+2 grand touring profile wasn’t carried forward into the F-Type’s design, the interior’s fine workmanship and beautiful attention to detail continues. In fact, I’d say this SVR’s cabin is even better, with rich red stitching and piping providing colour to the otherwise black Suedecloth and quilted leather surfaces, while its electronic interfaces are beyond comparison. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
The 8-speed auto provides ultra-quick shifts, while paddles make doing so easier. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Classic analogue dials flank a large 5.0-inch colour TFT multi-information display at centre, unchanged from past years, albeit the Touch Pro infotainment touchscreen on the centre stack is all new for 2019, growing from 8.0 to 10.0 inches in diameter and now flush-mounted without buttons down each side. It’s properly outfitted with navigation, a backup camera with active guidelines, Pro Services, InControl Apps, 770-watt 12- speaker Meridian surround audio, satellite and HD radio, and the list goes on, while Jaguar also added Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for $300. 

You can get into a 2019 F-Type Coupe SVR for just $140,500, or go topless for an extra $3,000, either of which is a bargain when compared to the Porsche 911 Turbo that will set you back $43,700 more for the hardtop or an additional $54,700 for the drop-top. That easily pays for the aforementioned $13,260 Carbon Ceramic Brake Pack with plenty left over, which includes 398 millimetre rotors up front and 380 mm discs at back, plus massive yellow calipers encircled by a stunning set of 10-spoke 20-inch diamond-turned alloys. Plenty of options were included with my test car and a yet more, like LED headlights, a heated steering wheel, rain-sensing wipers, auto-dimming centre and side mirrors, auto climate control, front and rear parking sensors, autonomous emergency braking, and lane keeping assist, comes standard, so make sure to check out all the 2019 F-Type trims, packages and options at CarCostCanada, not to mention rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Gotta love the SVR’s sport seats. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s difficult not to write an epic for such a phenomenal sports car, but instead of running on at the mouth I recommend you head to your local Jaguar retailer and ask them to start one up in the showroom or on the lot, turn on the switchable active exhaust, rev the throttle and then listen to the snap, crackle and pop of the exhaust. If you’re not raring to go for a drive after that, you might be better off moseying down the road to the Lexus store for a smooth, comfortable ride in ES 300 hybrid. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Trevor Hofmann and Karen Tuggay 

2019 Car Infotainment Features That Will Forever Change the Way You Drive!

In 2019, the infotainment system in your car is as indispensable as the steering wheel. No, that’s not really an exaggeration!

The word “infotainment” is sometimes carelessly thrown around without preamble. So let’s first address; What does infotainment system mean?

In the automotive industry, an infotainment system (or In-Vehicle Infotainment -IVI) refers to in-car technologies that bridge the gap between entertainment and information for the driver and passengers. These typically include audiovisual interfaces, touchscreens, keypads, and the likes.

These systems have tremendously evolved since their inception, and though many people assume that this is a relatively new technological advancement, in reality, the first modern infotainment system as we’ve come to know them today was created as far back as 1980!

Buying a car with an infotainment system in Canada takes some doing. There are so many aspects that come together to make the magic happen; internet connectivity, smartphone compatibility, advanced driver assistance features, real-time traffic announcement broadcasts – and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Below, we’ve shortlisted the most sought after infotainment features in 2019 and the cars that epitomize these features to the max!

 

Apple CarPlay Connectivity

Any person who owns a smartphone in the 21st century can sympathize with this cause! By its own admission, Apple CarPlay is a smarter and safer way to connect your iPhone to your vehicle. This savvy feature lets you interact with your phone’s entertainment services through the vehicle’s in-built display.

In 2019, over 100 million people in North America alone own an iPhone. It’s easy to see why the automotive industry has gone all out to integrate this particular feature. An uninterrupted and user-friendly in-car iPhone connection is the golden ticket as far as most drivers are concerned. With Apple CarPlay, you can now make calls, receive and send messages and stream music seamlessly without ever having to take your eyes off the road.

Our Top 3 Picks With Apple CarPlay Connectivity

 

Android Auto Connectivity

Android isn’t about to relinquish the reins to its counterpart just yet. Android Auto ensures a smooth and seamless connection between your phone’s OS and the car. It comes with a sleek and intuitive interface, integrated steering wheel controls and phenomenal new voice actions.

And just like Apple, its primary focus is to reduce on-road distractions, especially in light of Ontario’s updated distracted driving laws in 2019 that penalize drivers for taking their eyes off the road to interact with a handheld device.

In order to make use of this feature, your phone will require an OS that runs at 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher. With Android Auto, you can interact with your phone’s maps, messaging, radio and music features at just the click of a button.

Our Top 3 Picks With Android Auto Connectivity

 

Navigation System

Scoring a car with a reliable and regularly updated GPS system isn’t a negotiation but a necessity. While en route, you expect your car to generate quick directions in real time, decipher the fastest route, inform you of changing traffic patterns while also taking into account certain driving preferences.

Depending on the brand, you can invest in add-on GPS packages that further simplify travel and navigation while implementing accident prevention assistance. It is estimated that road conditions in North America change by about 15% every year. You should be able to bank on a system that grants you updated access to millions of miles of roads, highways, streets, signages, traffic conditions, points of interest, restaurants, etc.

The reason we’ve decided to cover this aspect is due to the fact that a common question we get asked is, “Which car has the best navigation system?Innovative GPS systems come part and parcel with the following 2019 vehicles.

Our Top 3 Picks With Powerful Navigation Systems

 

Entertainment Services (Audio + Video)

An infotainment system won’t hold much water if it’s doesn’t have a cutting edge audiovisual interface. Ideally, this should offer a wide suite of connectivity services to access your favourite music, radio shows, and podcasts. It should also offer standard features such as being able to double up as a Wi-Fi hotspot, seamless touchpad controls and some form of rear-seat entertainment to boot.

 

Which car has the biggest touch screen? The all-new 2019 RAM 1500 has a whopping 12-inch touchscreen display. This is second to Tesla’s behemoth 17-inch display.

Another instrumental feature that aids your car’s infotainment is the acoustic system. Bose, Bang & Olufsen and Harmon Kardon are the three leading manufacturers of in-car speakers that deliver crisp, clear and three-dimensional surround sounds.

Below, we answer the most pressing question yet; What cars have the best factory sound system? The brands that deliver phenomenal acoustics in 2019 are Audi, Ford, and Lexus.

Our Top 3 Picks With Innovative AudioVisuals

 

Infotainment Systems in 2019 Are A Whole New Ball Game

Before you buy your next car, get a free dealer invoice report. That way you’ll be getting the best infotainment features while still saving thousands and thousands of dollars!

Exclusive rebates and certified dealerships are only a click away.

Your dealer invoice report is ready and waiting. Get it here.

 

Porsche wows CIAS attendees with new 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport
Lighter and more potent thanks to a 425-hp H6, the new 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is a formidable track weapon. (Photo: Porsche)

A significant coup for last month’s Canadian International Auto Show was the introduction of the new Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport, a car rooted in the legendary brand’s racing heritage. The track-only Cayman, which was revealed in January at the Daytona International Speedway, made its first official motor show appearance at the Toronto event. 

The updated 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is now in its second generation, the first arriving on the motorsport scene in 2016 sans “718” script on the rear deck lid. Unlike the previous version, the new GT4 Clubsport can be had in two forms: first as a “Trackday” car set up for “ambitious amateur racing drivers,” and second as “a ‘Competition’ variant for national and international motor racing,” the latter to notably be used for this year’s GT3 Cup Challenge Canada series. 

Ahead of pointing out differences, both 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport models receive an updated version of the old 3.8-litre flat-six “boxer” engine, now good for 425 horsepower at 7,800 rpm, a 40-horsepower improvement over the previous 2016 car, while torque is now 4 lb-ft greater, to 313 lb-ft at 6,600 rpm. 

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport
The GT4 Clubsport comes standard with some impressive aero hardware. (Photo: Porsche)

Of note, this is the first six-cylinder 718 Cayman application since the car’s 2017 model year debut, due to the current 982-generation only using a turbocharged four-cylinder in various states of tune, causing some pundits to question whether a road-worthy Cayman with a horizontally opposed six-cylinder positioned just ahead of its rear axle will bolster the 718 Cayman ranks. 

That new GT4 Clubsport flat-six, which feeds on 98 octane Super Plus unleaded gasoline, packs a 12.5:1 compression ratio, integrated dry sump lubrication, racing-optimized engine and transmission water cooling with thermal management, four-valve technology with adjustable camshaft phasing and VarioCam Plus variable valve timing, a racing-optimized Continental SDI 9 electronic engine management system, plus more. 

Where the previous GT4 Clubsport shifted gears through a short-throw six-speed manual transmission, the new 718 version will solely utilize Porsche’s dual-clutch PDK automated gearbox, albeit with only six forward gears instead of the usual seven. The new model also features a reinforced dual mass flywheel, a racing-optimized electronic control unit, a racing-optimized mechanical rear axle differential lock, plus an internal pressure oil lubrication system boasting active oil cooling. 

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport
The GT4 Clubsport requires a trailer for transporting it to the track. (Photo: Porsche)

Additional modifications over road-going 718 Caymans include implementation of the 911 GT3 Cup car’s lightweight spring-strut front suspension; front and rear height, camber and track adjustable dampers; fixed shock absorbers with the Trackday car, or three-way racing shocks with rebound and two-stage high- and low-speed compression adjustment for the Competition; front and rear forged suspension links with optimized stiffness, double shear mountings, and high-performance spherical bearings; a three-hole design anti-roll bar up front; an adjustable blade-type anti-roll bar in the back; and five-bolt wheel hubs. 

The new rims are single-piece forged light alloy wheels wearing a new “weight-optimized” design, and rolling on 25/64 front and 27/68 rear Michelin transportation rubber, while Michelin also supplies the slick/wet tires that measure 25/64-18 and 27/68-18 front and rear, too. 

What’s more, behind those wheels and tires are racing-spec brakes that feature four multi-piece, ventilated and grooved steel discs measuring 380 millimetres in diameter, plus racing brake pads, aluminum mono-bloc six-piston front and four-piston rear racing calipers with “Anti Knock Back” piston springs, plus a brake booster with the Trackday version or brake balance adjustment via a balance bar system with the Competition model. 

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport
A closeup of the rear wing shows an intricate weave of organic fibres that are apparently sourced from agricultural by-products. (Photo: Porsche)

Despite the GT4 Clubsport’s factory-installed (FIA Art. 277 certified) safety cage, plus its 911 GT3-inspired front spoiler and sizeable fixed rear wing, which appear mostly carryover from the previous Clubsport, the race-spec Cayman weighs in at just 1,320 kilos, making it lighter than the outgoing model. 

Mass in mind, the GT4 Clubsport’s body structure is comprised of aluminum-steel composite and therefore light in weight; while additional features include a hood and rear deck lid fastened in place via quick-release latches; an (FIA Art. 275a certified) escape hatch in the roof; an FT3 fuel safety cell that measures 80 litres with the Trackday or 115 litres with the Competition model, both featuring an FIA-compliant “Fuel Cut Off” safety valve; pre-installed mounting points for a three-piston air jack system for the Trackday, or a factory-installed three-piston air jack system with the Competition; and FIA-certified towing loops front and rear. 

Also, a motorsport centre console with “enhanced functionality and adapted usability” gets added to the instrument panel, a six-point safety harness is included with its single Recaro race bucket driver’s seat, which also includes two-way fore and aft adjustments as well as an adjustable padding system, and lastly provisions are made for a safety net. 

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport
I think we all want to get our hands on this race-spec steering wheel. (Photo: Porsche)

While safety is critical, and improving performance paramount for any new racing car, with Porsche having clearly claimed that its new 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport improves overall drivability and therefore should provide faster lap times than its predecessor, it’s surprising that Porsche also put time and effort into its environmental initiatives, not normally a key issue in this class of sports car. The end result is a production-first racecar technology that could potentially find more widespread use: natural-fibre composite body parts. 

The 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport’s door skins and rear wing (specifically the wing flap, sideblades, and “swan neck” mounts) are actually formed from an organic fibre mix that’s sourced from agricultural by-products such as hemp or flax fibres. Porsche says the new age components weigh approximately the same as if made from carbon-fibre, while their strength is also similar. 

Specific to each model, the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport Trackday gets fixed shock absorbers, plus ABS, ESC, and traction control assistance systems for easier control at high speeds, the latter of which can all be deactivated. Improving comfort and safety respectively, the Trackday also includes air-conditioning and a handheld fire extinguisher, while it can be serviced at Porsche Centres throughout Canada. 

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport
No PCM touchscreen here, the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport’s centre stack is all business. (Photo: Porsche)

You’ll need your own team of mechanics for the Competition model, however, and one of them will need to be well versed in three-stage shock adjustment, while you’ll need to figure out how to adjust the front/rear bias of the brake balance system yourself. Additionally, your pit stop team will be able to change the tires quickly thanks to its aforementioned integrated air jacks, and the larger safety fuel cell will make sure time off the track will be kept to a minimum. 

Safety features not yet mentioned include an automated fire extinguishing system, and a quick release race steering wheel pulled from the 911 GT3 R. 

Priced considerably higher than a street legal 718 Cayman, which starts at just $63,700, the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport Trackday model can be had for $216,500, whereas the same car with the Competition package starts at $242,000. 

Interested parties should contact Porsche Motorsport North America in Carson, California, or alternatively your local Porsche retailer, which no doubt would be happy to put you in touch. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press 

Photo credits: Porsche 

Copyright: Canadian Auto Press Inc.