CarCostCanada

VW shows off rendering of 2021 Arteon four-door coupe update

2021 Volkswagen Arteon
While this rendering makes the refreshed 2021 Arteon appear longer, lower and wider than the existing model, we should only expect mild updates.

With the release of these swoopy artist’s renderings Volkswagen has announced the virtual world première of its updated 2021 Arteon four-door coupe will occur on June 24th, and along with scant information about the new car is the revelation of a new body style.

The blue car on the left is indeed a sport wagon, although despite having four doors plus a rear liftgate, and therefore being similar in concept to the Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo, Volkswagen has dubbed it a Shooting Brake, which is normally a term given to a two-door wagon with a rear hatch like Ferrari’s 2011–2016 FF or the classic 1972–1973 Volvo P1800ES (although Mercedes-Benz called its four-door CLS sport wagon a Shooting Brake when it debuted for 2012, which was followed up with a 2015 CLA Shooting Brake).

2019 Volkswagen Arteon
Today’s Arteon is already one of the sleekest four-door sedans in the mid-size volume-branded sector (2019 model shown).

Just like those elongated Mercs, however, the five-door VW won’t be coming to Canada or the U.S., leaving we North American with only getting the four-door fastback variant, but selling such a niche vehicle in our markets is already a risky business proposition as clearly shown in the car’s sales figures.

Despite the Arteon’s stylish sheet metal and nicely sorted interior, the slick VeeDub only found 456 buyers throughout all of calendar year 2019 (albeit deliveries only started in March), which put it in last place within the mainstream mid-size sedan class. VW’s Passat, the Arteon’s more upright, practical and affordable four-door counterpart managed to stay one position ahead with 672 deliveries last year, but bringing up the rear was nothing for Volkswagen’s Canadian division to be excited about.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon
We can expect subtle changes to the 2021 Arteon’s backside as well (2019 Arteon shown).

Yes, it was the ninth year of the outgoing eighth-generation model, and therefore as long in the tooth as anything in this segment has ever been, but that not updating this important model was Volkswagen’s fault to begin with, so being last amongst conventional mid-size sedans was inevitable. Also notable, VW’s poor Passat and Arteon sales occurred well before we were facing all of the current health, social and economic problems.

It’s difficult to say whether a slowdown in Q1 2020 Arteon sales had much to do with the just-mentioned issues or was instead a self-imposed reduction of inventory ahead of the refreshed 2021 model, but either way VW only managed to sell 81 units in Canada for the first three months of this year, but the automaker’s Ajax, Ontario office would have been happy to see deliveries of the all-new Passat increase during the same quarter, the model’s 523 unit-sales nearly as strong as the entire year before.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon
The current Arteon already provides one of the more impressive interiors in its class.

While it might at first appear like the Passat’s stronger Q1 sales results could be a good sign for the new Arteon, at least when not factoring in the aforementioned health, social and especially economic problems, nobody’s complaining about the 2019-2020 Arteon’s styling. In fact, it already shares many of the design cues of the new Passat. Of course, the artist’s rendering looks longer, lower, wider and leaner than today’s car, which is normal for these types of cartoon-like creations, so before getting all excited it’s probably best to visually squish the eye-popping drawing back into more reasonable proportions, and while you’re at it reduce the size of the gargantuan wheels. Once this is done the 2021 model will probably appear a lot like today’s version, other than its updated front grille and reshaped front fascia, not to mention similarly minor changes provided at the back.

The current Arteon cabin is the nicest available in the 2020 Volkswagen fleet, or at least the one offered here, and although we shouldn’t expect any radical changes VW does promise its newest modular infotainment matrix 3 (MIB3) system for quicker app processing, enhanced connectivity, better functionality, and improved entertainment overall.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon
Changes to the new Arteon’s infotainment system and other electronic interfaces should count amongst its most dramatic updates.

VW will also make its “highly assisted” Travel Assist system available, which is similar to the hands-on-the-steering-wheel, self-corrective, semi-autonomous driver assist technologies already on offer by other brands. Likewise, Travel Assist was designed for highway use, and to that effect so-equipped 2021 Arteon models will be able to apply steering, accelerating and braking inputs autonomously at speeds up to 210 km/h (130 mph), as long as the driver remains in control.

Of course, such advanced technologies could very likely add considerable sums to the price of this already expensive sport sedan, which at $49,960 isn’t exactly entry-level. This said, the Arteon’s key four-door coupe rival, the Kia Stinger, comes close to $45k in base trim and nearly $50k when loaded up, but Canadian buyers obviously believe it delivers better value as they purchased 1,569 examples last year. It’s approximate $5k discount and stronger base and optional engines, not to mention fuller load of features in all trims, would’ve likely been important differentiators, plus the South Korean model handles well, includes near-premium interior quality, and isn’t hard on the eyes.

2021 Volkswagen Arteon
While the 2021 Arteon Shooting Brake would no doubt be welcomed by ardent VW loyalists, it probably doesn’t make for a good business case.

In case the current Arteon has caught your eye, you can get your hands on a 2019 example for quite a bit less than the manufacturer suggested retail price right now. In fact, a quick glance at our 2019 Volkswagen Arteon Canada Prices page shows up to $5,000 in additional incentives available, while the 2020 Arteon is being offered with zero-percent factory leasing and financing rates. Then again, a quick check of our 2019 Kia Stinger Canada Prices page will inform of additional incentives up to $5,000, while four-door coupe buyers interested in the latest 2020 Stinger can get up to $4,000 in incentives. To learn more about these savings and gain access to manufacturer rebate info and even dealer invoice pricing, read this short article about how a CarCostCanada membership can save you thousands on your next purchase of any vehicle. And while you’re at it, make sure to check out our mobile app at Google’s Play Store and Apple’s iTunes store, which is ideal for accessing all the info above while shopping. 

As for more on the 2021 Arteon, check this spot later this month and we’ll have all the most important details.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Volkswagen

CarCostCanada

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD Road Test

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The V90 Cross Country offers a nice combination of quick, comfortable wagon and rugged SUV.

Volvo’s V90 Cross Country started life just three years ago for the 2017 model year, and it’s already being discontinued in Canada. The 2019 model year will be this large luxury crossover wagon’s final curtain call, along with the regular V90 sport wagon that’s also seen sales diminish dramatically since the smaller V60 wagon, V60 Cross Country and XC60 luxury crossover SUVs were redesigned. This leaves the impressive S90 luxury sedan as the only model from Volvo’s mid-size threesome to continue into 2020.

It might seem a bit strange to choose a big luxury sedan over a supposedly trendier crossover wagon, but such is the case with Volvo Canada. The Swedish automaker’s US division is currently selling a 2020 version of the V90 Cross Country with a refreshed 2021 waiting in the wings, but we’ll need to go Stateside to see that. As it is, Volvo hasn’t been purveying many mid-size E-segment vehicles north of the 49th, with sales of its S90, V90 and V90 Cross Country trio plunging 65 percent to just 295 units last year.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
Sadly, the good looking and highly functional V90 Cross Country was discontinued after the 2019 model year.

As a backgrounder, the V90 Cross Country replaced the much-loved 2000-2016 XC70, and by doing so combined Volvo’s recently reinvigorated sense of style with its well respected quality, sensible practicality, and turbocharged, supercharged four-cylinder performance to the mid-size crossover wagon category, while increasing the level of opulent luxury on offer.

Those familiar with today’s Volvo understand what I’m talking about, particularly when any of its models are upgraded to their top-tier R-Design or Inscription trim levels. This said the V90 Cross Country doesn’t get so fancy with hierarchal names here in the Canadian market, merely using one no-name trim and various packages to add options. On that note my test model featured a Premium package that includes a generous list of standard features and wealth of impressive furnishings, making for one of the more luxurious crossover wagons available.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The LED headlights, fog lamps and 19-inch alloys are standard.

I’m sure Audi and its many loyal enthusiasts would argue that the German brand’s entirely new 2020 A6 Allroad is even more resplendent, and despite the Ingolstadt-based contender being wholly impressive, Gothenburg’s outgoing alternative looks and feels even more upscale inside even though it’s priced $12,700 lower.

A 2019 V90 Cross Country can be had for just $62,500, whereas the A6 Allroad is comparably expensive at $75,200, and while Audi gets some prestige points for brand image, plus its potent turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 that puts out an extra 19 horsepower and 74 lb-ft of torque over Volvo’s turbocharged and supercharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder that makes 316 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque, this Swedish alternative is a bit easier on fuel thanks to a claimed Transport Canada rating of 11.6 L/100km city, 8.1 highway and 10.0 combined, compared to 11.8, 9.1 and 10.6 respectively.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The V90 Cross Country’s SUV-like detailing is very upscale.

Previously Volvo sold a $59,500 V90 Cross Country T5 AWD with 250 horsepower, but it was cancelled at the end of the 2018 model year, as was the previous top-line $84,900 Ocean Race T6 AWD.  The just-noted $3,900 Premium package certainly adds to this 2019 model’s luxury accoutrements, however, with features like heatable windshield washer nozzles, auto-dimming and power-folding exterior mirrors, LED interior lights, aluminum treadplates, a heatable steering wheel, front and rear parking sonar with graphical proximity indicators, Park Assist Pilot semi-autonomous self-parking, a 360 Surround View camera, a universal garage door opener, four-zone auto climate control, a cooled glove box, heated rear outboard seats, power-folding rear seatbacks and outer head restraints, a wonderfully useful semi-automatic cargo cover, an integrated mesh safety net to protect passengers from potentially flying cargo, blindspot monitoring with cross-traffic alert, etcetera.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The V90 Cross Country’s cabin is very inviting and more luxurious than you might be expecting.

The $62,500 base price for the 2019 V90 Cross Country T6 AWD doesn’t include $900 for metallic paint, incidentally, which is a no-cost option with Audi, but the A6 Allroad only gives you the choice of black or beige leather inside, and it’s not the same high-grade Nappa leather as in the V90 CC, which is available in four zero-cost optional colours including Charcoal (black), Amber (dark beige), Maroon Brown (dark reddish brown) and Blond (light grey).

Of course, both cars can be loaded up, my tester not fully equipped. In fact it was missing a $3,600 Luxury package featuring a beautifully tailored instrument panel, an enhanced set of front seats with power-adjustable side bolsters, power-extendable lower cushions, multi-technique massage capability, and ventilation, as well as manually retractable rear window side sunshades.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
Comfortable and well laid out, the V90 Cross Country is easy to live with.

My tester didn’t include the $2,350 optional rear air suspension and Four-C Active Chassis upgrade either, and only came with 19-inch alloy wheels instead of 20-inch alloys that cost $1,000 more, while it was also missing body-colour bumpers, wheel arches and sills, Metal Mesh decor inlays (although the hardwood was very nice), a black headliner, a graphical head-up display, a Bowers & Wilkins premium audio system (with ¬gorgeous aluminum speaker grilles—a $3,750 option), and two dual-stage child booster seats integrated within the rear outboard positions, all of which might add $18,375 to the 2019 V90 Cross Country’s price, potentially hoisting it up to $80,875.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
A fully digital instrument cluster comes standard.

While this might seem like a lot of money for a mid-size luxury crossover wagon, consider for a moment that the 2020 Audi A6 Allroad Technik starts at $83,100 without any massage action, and while Audi’s impressive “Virtual Cockpit” digital gauge package is included (the V90 features a digital instrument cluster too, just not quite as configurable), being massaged from below a higher grade of Valcona leather will cost A6 Allroad buyers an additional $4,050, whereas including all of the V90 CC’s advanced driver assistance systems will add another $2,400.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The V90 CC’s tablet-style infotainment touchscreen is fully featured and easy to use.

Audi buyers can also add the A6 Allroad’s $2,500 Dynamic package with Dynamic Steering and Dynamic All-Wheel Steering, another $2,500 for Night Vision Assistant, $500 more for quieter dual-pane glass, $350 extra for Audi Phonebox with wireless charging, an additional $350 for rear side airbags, and $1,000 more for full body paint (which was already priced into the top-tier V90 CC), bringing the German car’s max price up to $102,650, less $1,000 in additional incentives when signing up for a CarCostCanada membership, which provides info on all current rebates, financing and leasing deals, plus otherwise difficult to get dealer invoice pricing, so you can be fully prepared before negotiating with your local retailer (see our 2020 Audi A6 allroad Canada Prices page).

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
Check out this bird’s eye view! The V90 CC’s overhead camera makes parking easy.

Keep in mind the additional incentives for the A6 Allroad are $1,000 less impressive than the $2,000 any Volvo dealer will chop off of the price of a 2019 V90 Cross Country (see that on our 2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country Canada Prices page), but even before factoring in such savings, this Volvo should truly impress anyone choosing between these two impressive crossover SUVs.

Both are unmistakably attractive inside and out, thanks to dynamic designs and the latest LED lighting tech. Some will like the minimalist Audi cabin more, while Volvo’s ritzier look will appeal to others. Faulting either on their quality of materials and overall construction will fall on deaf ears, as they’re both superbly crafted.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The V90 CC’s eight-speed automatic is sublimely smooth.

True, but Volvo makes a nicer key fob. Say what? Yes, it’s easily one of the nicest remotes in the industry, even making you feel special when outside of the car thanks to the same Nappa leather surrounding its flat surfaces as found the car’s seat upholstery, plus beautifully detailed metal around the edges. Of course, being that most owners only touch their proximity-sensing remotes when switching jackets or purses it seems a bit extravagant, but going above and beyond has always been part of what luxury owners crave.

Volvo covers the majority of surfaces with premium soft-touch synthetic or optional contrast-stitched leather, not to mention beautiful dark oak inlays on the instrument panel and doors. The more upmarket version swaps the wood out with metal inlays, as mentioned earlier, while there’s no shortage of satin-finish aluminum accents everywhere else.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
Much of the V90 Cross Country’s switchgear is jewel-like.

Volvo makes sure to cover most surfaces below the waste in premium pliable synthetic, which isn’t the case with a fair number of premium brands like Lexus (although they don’t sell anything in this niche segment), while each pillar is covered in the same nicely woven material as the roof liner.

While most features mentioned so far is par for the course in the luxury sector, much of the V90 CC’s buttons, knobs and switches look more like fine jewellery than anything mechanical. Volvo uses a dazzling diamond patterned bright metal to edge much of its switchgear, including the main audio knob, the rotating ignition switch, the scrolling drive mode selector, and the air vent actuators. No rival goes so far to wow its owners this side of Bentley, making the V90 CC and most everything else Volvo has on offer stand out from the rest of the luxury field.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
These seats are fabulous!

Before continuing, I need to point out that most everything I’ve mentioned comes standard in Canada, the aforementioned digital gauge cluster included. An impressive vertical tablet-like infotainment touchscreen takes up the majority of the centre stack, with super clear, high-definition graphics and deep, rich colours, plus an interface that’s as easy to use as a smartphone or tablet thanks to familiar tap, swipe and pinch capabilities (not always the norm in the luxury class). It comes filled with all the expected functions too, including one of the coolest HVAC temperature controllers in the industry, and a superb 360-degree overhead camera system. The touchscreen in my V90 CC tester, which comes near to being a top-line model, is almost exactly the same as the one in the smallest and most affordable Volvo XC40 crossover SUV, or any other new Volvo, which allows easy adaptation to those moving up through the range.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
Big enough sunroof for you? The V90 Cross Country comes standard with this panoramic sunroof.

The digital instrument cluster offers up a bright, clear display too, albeit with a slight matte finish to diminish glare. While it’s configurable, Volvo doesn’t go so far to wow its driver as Audi does with its previously noted Virtual Cockpit, being that you’re not able to make the multi-infotainment display in the centre system larger and the circular gauges smaller. Where Audi amazes is the Virtual Cockpit’s ability to dramatically reduce the size of the primary dials and maximize the multi-info display to the point it takes over most of the screen, which is great for viewing the navigation’s map while driving. The V90’s gauge package provides good functionality in different ways, mind you, with the primary instruments reducing in size slightly while some multi-info display features get used, and the centre area is fairly large and appealing thanks to attractive graphics and most functions from the infotainment system.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The rear passenger compartment is roomy, comfortable, and beautifully finished.

While the V90 CC provides state-of-the-art electronic interfaces and surrounds its generous supply of features with a sumptuous interior, it wouldn’t matter one bit if Volvo didn’t supply the worthy powertrain noted earlier, and matching handling dynamics. The big wagon’s 315 horsepower and 279 pound-feet of torque are more than enough for energetic V6-like acceleration from standstill and ample get-up-and-go during passing manoeuvres. The engine combines with a quick-shifting eight-speed automatic transmission with manual mode, but alas there aren’t paddles for wandering fingers. Those wanting to do their own shifting can do so via the gear lever, but other than for testing I never bothered, as it’s a superb transmission when left to its own devices.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
The V90 Cross Country’s innovative cargo cover automatically pulls itself up and out of the way when the tailgate opens.

The comfort-focused V90 Cross Country isn’t quite as quick through the corners as the more road-hugging V90 T6 AWD R-Design sport wagon I tested previously, but it’s not far off. The CC gets a 58-millimetre (2.3-inch) suspension lift, meaning that its centre of gravity is affected, so its lateral grip isn’t quite as tenacious as the sportier wagon. This said, unless really trying to make time through a winding mountainside back road you probably won’t notice, and besides, the Cross Country is more about comfort than speed anyway. To that end it’s suspension, together with its aforementioned front seats, is glorious, and ideal for charting the cottage road less travelled or trekking through deep snow.

Making the latter possible, all V90 Cross Country crossover wagons come standard with all-wheel drive, albeit no off-road mode so don’t go wild when venturing into the wilderness. Still, it handles slippery situations well, making me confident that light-duty off-road conditions would be no problem.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
This built-in cargo divider includes grocery bag hooks.

Volvo provides a set of aluminum roof rails as standard equipment, while you can get roof rack cross-members, bike racks, storage toppers and more from your dealer’s parts department, all coming together to make the V90 Cross Country a perfect companion for outdoor activities such as cycling, kayaking, and camping trips. A $1,345 trailer hitch package with electronic monitoring and Trailer Stability Assist (TSA) is also available, perfect for towing a small boat or camp trailer.

Along with the comfortable ride and superb seats mentioned earlier, the V90 CC’s driving position is wonderfully adjustable and therefore ideal for most body types. I’m slightly shorter than average at five-foot-eight, with legs that are longer than my torso, which sometimes causes a challenge if the telescopic steering column doesn’t reach far enough rearward. The V90 CC had no such problems, resulting in a comfortable setup that left me fully in control.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
A mesh cargo net keeps passengers safe from flying cargo in case of an accident.

When sitting behind the driver’s seat set to my height, I still had 10 inches ahead of my knees, plus about five inches from my shoulder to the door panel, another four beside my hips, and three and a half or so over my head. Stretching my legs out, with my shoes below the driver’s seat, was easy, while rear seat comfort was enhanced with my test car’s four-zone automatic climate control that included a handy interface on the backside of the front console. A set of heatable outboard seats would be popular with rear passengers for winter ski trips without doubt, as would the big standard panoramic sunroof anytime of the year. Adding to the sense of openness, the V90 CC also gets rear HVAC vents on the backside of the front centre console, plus another set more on the midpoint of each B-pillar. A really fancy centre armrest folds down between outboard passengers, featuring pop-out dual cupholders, a shallow tray, plus a lidded and lined stowage bin, while LED reading lights hover overhead.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
A small but useful centre pass-through ups the V90 CC’s practicality.

A power tailgate provides access to the V90 CC’s spacious cargo compartment, at which point the previously noted retractable cargo cover automatically moves up and out of the way. The cargo area measures 560 litres (19.8 cubic feet) aft of the rear seatbacks and about 1,530 litres (54 cu ft) with the rear row dropped down, and is beautifully finished with high-quality carpets right up each sidewalls and on the rear seatbacks, plus the floor of course, while underneath a rubber all-weather cargo mat (which comes as part of a $355 Protection package also including floor trays for four of the five seating positions, a centre tunnel cover, and the just-mentioned cargo tray), my test model’s floor included a pop-up cargo divider with integrated grocery bag hooks. The cargo floor can be lifted one more time, providing access to a shallow carpeted compartment for stowing very thin items (it was ideal for storing the carpeted floor mats while the all-season ones were being used).

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
No shortage of gear-toting space behind the 60/40-split rear seatbacks.

I really appreciated the V90’s centre pass-through, which made the otherwise 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks more versatile, but this said it’s a bit small and narrow, and not as useful as a true 40/20/40-split rear seatback. Still, two pairs of skis could fit within, but you’d still need to stow two down the 40-percent portion of the cargo area if four wanted to go skiing, forcing one passenger onto the hump in the middle. When dropping those seats, however, powered release buttons on the cargo sidewall make the job ultra-easy. These flip the headrests forward automatically as well, which can also be lowered from the front to improve rear visibility.

2019 Volvo V90 Cross Country T6 AWD
There’s plenty of cargo space in the V90 Cross Country.

So who’s right for the V90 Cross Country? I think it’s perfect for those considering the move up from a traditional four-door sedan or wagon into something more practical, yet not ready for a big, SUV-style crossover like Volvo’s XC90. This said I’m not going to recommend the V90 CC over Audi’s new A6 Allroad or vice versa, at least not yet, mostly because I haven’t driven the new German. Still, having spent some time inside the Ingolstadt alternative, I can easily say this Volvo measures up, while Audi will have to work very hard to achieve more comfort than this V90 CC, and any advantage in fuel economy is a good thing (although some would rather have more power).

At the end of the day it comes down to one’s personal taste, not to mention the ability of your local Volvo retailer to source a new V90 Cross Country. If you like what you see don’t wait any longer as they’re disappearing quickly.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo Editing: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

2020 Mercedes-AMG C 43 4Matic Wagon Road Test

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
The Mercedes-AMG C 43 4Matic Wagon is a fully capable sport sedan with the functionality of an SUV.

Modern-day crossover sport utilities are great, but let’s face it, most everyone’s got one these days. There’s a reason, of course, as they combine loads of practicality with car-like attributes, with some even coming close to matching the performance of sport sedans.

Mercedes’ AMG sub-brand is good example of the latter thanks to the German brand providing Canadian luxury buyers with hyper-tuned versions of their GLA subcompact SUV, GLC compact SUV (including the GLC Coupe), GLE mid-size SUV (the GLE Coupe only coming in AMG trims), and rugged G full-size off-road capable SUV, but take note that performance buyers wanting the same kind of utility as an SUV with even better cornering capability, due to inherently lower centres of gravity, can opt for Mercedes’ lineup of performance wagons too.

Mercedes has a long history of producing ultra-quick wagons, the 1979 (W123-body) 500 TE AMG quickly coming to mind, so it’s great news to diehard performance enthusiasts that the tradition continues to this day. Check out the brand’s retail website and you’ll easily find AMG-tuned versions of its C- and E-Class Wagons, including the AMG C 43 4Matic Wagon on this page, plus the AMG E 53 4Matic+ Wagon and AMG E 63 S 4Matic+ Wagon.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
Great looking AMG C 43 4Matic Wagon can be made even more menacing by adding glossy black exterior accents via the AMG Night package.

While very practical for those with active lifestyles, the last car on this list might be outside of most buyers’ budgets at $124,200, although if you’re late for Johnny or Jenny’s morning skate there’s no better way to make up for lost time than in a five-door that can shoot from standstill to 100km/h in an unfathomable 3.3 seconds. The fire-breathing demon under the hood is Mercedes’ 603 horsepower 4.0-litre biturbo V8, while the $87,800 AMG E 53 4Matic+ Wagon still does pretty well with a 4.5-second run to 100 km/h from its 429 horsepower 3.0-litre inline six.

The smaller AMG C 43 4Matic Wagon is most affordable at $60,900, but don’t let its relatively inexpensive price make you think it’s by any means lethargic off the line. In fact, its 385-horsepower 3.0-litre biturbo V6, which features rapid-multispark ignition and a high-pressure direct injection system, launches it from zero to 100 km/h in just 4.8 seconds, much credit to 384 lb-ft of torque, and the noise emanating from its engine bay and available sport exhaust system means that its auditory delights are almost as delectable as the rush of speed to the head.

Interestingly, the only D-segment wagon on the Canadian market with similar engine specs to this AMG C 43 is Volvo’s 405 horsepower V60 Polestar, but as amazing as its engineering is, the Swedish automaker’s ultra-smooth 2.0-litre turbocharged and supercharged hybrid powertrain is not as stimulating as the AMG C 43 Wagon’s rambunctious V6, or for that matter its new AMG SpeedShift TCT nine-speed transmission, or its AMG tuned 4Matic all-wheel drive system.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
LED cornering headlights, 19-inch alloys and glossy black details means that this AMG C 43 Wagon has some extras added.

I’ve seen the C 43 in black and it looks a lot more menacing than my tester’s Polar White, but Mercedes made up for its angelic do-gooder appearance with plenty of standard matte and optional glossy black exterior accents. Highlights include a black mesh front grille and lower vent gratings within a deeper front fascia, plus gloss-black strakes over corner vents, the mirror housings, the partial glass roof and roof rails, the side window trim, the aggressive rear diffuser, the four exhaust pipes, and the 19-inch alloy wheels encircled by Continental ContiSportContact SSR 225/40 high performance summer tires.

My test model’s LED headlights were style statements of their own, with each featuring a trio of separate lighting elements that look as good as the well-lit road ahead, while nice splashes of chrome around the body remind everything that this is AMG C 43 is a Mercedes-Benz after all, and therefore designed to be just as luxurious as it is sporty.

To that end, proximity keyless entry allows access to the cabin, where your eyes will likely first fixate upon two of the most impressive sport seats in industry. They’re covered in black perforated leather with red stitching and brushed aluminum four-point harness holes on their upper backrests, as well as a small AMG badge at centre. Then again, it’s quite possible you’ll first be distracted by the incredible door panel design, which gets even more brushed and satin-finish aluminum trim, as well as optional drilled aluminum Burmester speaker grilles and black leather with red stitching elsewhere.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
This C 43 Wagon’s aggressive rear diffuser gets stuffed full of a free-flow AMG Performance Exhaust System.

The red-stitched, padded leather treatment continues over to the dash top and instrument panel, all the way down each side of the centre stack, while the latter features gorgeous optional carbon-fibre surfacing that extends down to the lower centre console that terminates at a big, bisected centre armrest/storage bin lid finished in yet more soft leather with red stitching.

Big in mind, two large glass sunroofs look like a single panoramic roof at first glance, yet provide more torsional rigidity than a full glass roof would. Considering the C 43 Wagon is capable of a 250-km/h (155-mph) terminal velocity, as well as harrowing at-the-limit handling, it’s critical to have a stiff body structure, and fortunately this minimizes the luxurious wagon’s wind and road noise.

Of course Mercedes wraps the roof pillars in the same high-quality fabric as the roofliner, which helps to reduce NVH levels somewhat, but most is due to the rigid body structure noted earlier, plus the various seals, insulation, engine and component mounts, plus more. Therefore it’s a near silent experience, other than the rumbling of the engine and/or the sensational Burmester audio system.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
The AMG C 43 Wagon’s interior is exquisite.

It’s possible to control the volume of its 13 speakers from a beautifully detailed knurled metal cylinder switch on the right steering wheel spoke, this being only one of the C 43’s impressive array of steering wheel buttons, toggles and touch-sensitive pads. Yes, each spoke gets its own classic Blackberry-like touchpad that lets you scroll through the available digital gauge cluster or the main display on the centre stack. The steering wheel rim is as attractive as the metallic surfaced spokes, its partial Nappa leather-wrapping around flattened sides and bottom for an F1-inspired look, while a slim red leather top marker aligns the centre, and suede-look Dinamica (much like Alcantara) makes for better grip at each side.

I’d have to say there’s more satin-finish and brushed aluminum trimmings in the AMG C 43 than any rival, but rather than looking garish Mercedes pulls it off with a tasteful level of retro steampunk coolness that elevates it into a class of one. The highlight for me are its five circular air vents on the instrument panel, the three in the middle hovering above an attractive row of knurled metal-topped satin aluminum toggle-like switches, and these are only upstaged by a great looking knurled metal cylinder switch for the drive mode select, which includes Comfort, Sport, Sport+ and Slippery settings. There’s a rotating dial for the infotainment system too, this also finished in knurled aluminum, and positioned just underneath Mercedes’ trademark palm rest, which doubles as a touchpad with an upgrade.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
No rival does door panels as nicely as Mercedes-Benz.

Premium brands mostly use better quality digital displays than their mainstream volume competitors, which is how it should be given their loftier prices, and Mercedes is no different. In fact, the most recently updated three-pointed star cars and SUVs include the brand’s ultra-advanced double-display design that seamlessly mates a tablet-style 12.3-inch screen directly in front of the driver for all primary gauges with an identically sized infotainment display. This said the current fourth-generation (W205) C-Class (S205 for the wagon) introduced in September of 2014 for the 2015 model year, and therefore in its seventh production year, hasn’t been updated with latest dash design yet, but its more conventional hooded analogue gauge cluster (with a big multi-information display at centre) can be swapped out for a 12.3-inch set of digital instruments when upgrading to the C 43 Wagon’s Technology package.

Mercedes digital instrument cluster is as colourful as any on the market, and very customizable with a variety of background designs and plenty of multi-info functions. It allows for many feature combinations as well, and can be set up with a traditional dual-gauge look, or the entire display can be a navigation map, for instance.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
A feast for the eyes and the senses, the C 43’s cabin is beautifully detailed, very well made and extremely comfortable.

The AMG C 43 Wagon’s infotainment display is smaller at 7.0 inches, although it can be upgraded to 10.25 inches like my tester. As is common these days (although Mercedes was an initiator of the design), the centre display sits upright atop the dash, while its graphic design is as colourful and appealing as the just-noted gauge cluster. Its features are comprehensive, but take note you’ll need to use the aforementioned lower console-mounted controls for any tap, swipe and pinch finger gestures, as it’s not a touchscreen.

The Technology package I spoke of a moment ago will set you back $1,900, while together with the 12.3-inch digital instruments it also includes the active Multibeam LED headlamps mentioned earlier, plus adaptive high beam assist, while the gloss-black exterior accents mentioned before comes as part of a $1,000 AMG Night package.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
A fully digital gauge cluster is optional, and it’s a brilliantly colourful, fully featured design with good customization capability.

The AMG Nappa/Dinamica performance steering wheel that I lauded earlier can be had if you choose the $2,400 AMG Driver’s package, which also adds the free-flow AMG performance exhaust system with push-button computer-controlled vanes, the 19-inch AMG five-twin-spoke aero wheels (the base model sports 18s), increased top speed to 250 km/h (155 mph), and an AMG Track Pace app that allows performance data like speed, acceleration, lap and sector times to be stored in the infotainment system when out on the track.

If you’re really up on your AMG C 43 knowledge, and I have readers who are, you’ll immediately notice that my tester’s steering wheel is devoid of the extra switchgear the AMG Driver’s package includes for 2020, so no I must confess that the car you’re looking at is actually a 2019 model I drove last year, but didn’t get around to reviewing (bad journalist). New this year (2020) is an AMG Drive Unit that with F1-inspired switchgear attached below each steering wheel spoke, these designed for quickly making adjustments to performance settings. The pod of switches on the left can be assigned to features such as manual shift mode, the AMG Ride Control system’s damping modes, the three-stage ESP system, and the AMG Performance Exhaust, while the circular switch on the right selects and displays the current AMG Dynamic Select driving mode.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
The centre stack is well organized and impeccably finished, especially when upgraded to carbon-fibre surfacing.

By the way, the C 43 Wagon on this page is otherwise identical to the 2020 model, except for twin rear USB ports that are now standard in all 2020 C-Class models. Likewise, the $5,600 Premium package included with my test car is the same as the one found in the 2020 C 43 Wagon, both featuring proximity keyless entry, the touchpad infotainment controller, and the 590-watt Burmester surround sound system, as well as an overhead bird’s-eye parking camera, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration, a very accurate navigation system, voice control, satellite radio, real-time traffic information, a wireless phone charging pad, an universal garage door opener, semi-autonomous self-parking, rear side window sunshades, and a power liftgate with foot-activated opening.

The $2,700 Intelligent Drive package was also added, this collection of goodies including Pre-Safe Plus, Active Emergency Stop Assist, Active Brake Assist with Cross-Traffic Function, Active Steering Assist, Active Blind Spot Assist, Active Lane Change Assist, Active Lane Keeping Assist, Evasive Steering Assist, Active Distronic Distance Assist, Enhanced Stop-and-Go, Traffic Sign Assist, Active Speed Limit Assist, and Route-based Speed Adaptation.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
The high-definition centre display provides myriad functions and superbly colourful graphics.

While the hot looking $250 designo red seatbelts certainly deserve attention, I’ll refrain from delving into standard features and options as this review is already epic. My C 43 Wagon was nicely loaded up and even base models are generously equipped, while their finishing is second to none in this class. Most important amongst AMG cars is the driving experience, however, and to that end I couldn’t help but also notice the impressive dual-screen backup and 360-degree surround camera with dynamic guidelines as I backed out of my driveway, but strangely to those not familiar with Mercedes-Benz, this sport wagon’s auto shifter remains on the column like classics from the good old days. While this might seem a bit old school, it’s actually efficiently out of the way. One flick of the stalk-like lever and it’s state-of-the-art electronic innards will make themselves known, while pressing the Park button is a dead giveaway that it’s hardly an automotive anachronism. Look to the steering wheel-mounted paddles for manual shifting, something I found myself doing more often than not thanks to the superbly engineered nine-speed automatic gearbox.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
Performance seats don’t get any better than this.

Of course it’s smooth, Mercedes never forgetting the C 43 Wagon’s pragmatic purpose, but the transmission’s AMG programming puts an emphasis on performance. Its nine speeds result in a wider range of more closely spaced ratios that shift lickety-split quick, while previously noted AMG Dynamic Select’s Comfort, Sport and Sport+ modes truly add to the magic. This said, Mercedes included three overdrive ratios for optimizing fuel economy, which together with ECO Start/Stop that automatically turns off the engine when it would otherwise be idling adds to its efficiency while also reducing emissions. The end result is good fuel economy considering the power on tap, the C 43 Wagon capable of an estimated 12.4 L/100km city, 8.9 highway and 10.8 combined in both 2019 and 2020 model years.

Of course, all-wheel drive saps energy while enhancing traction, but the C 43’s AMG 4Matic AWD system provides a good balance of efficiency and at-the-limit grip. To manage the latter it has a fixed 31:69 front/rear torque split, while a nicely weighted electromechanical power-assist rack-and-pinion steering system provides good feel, and a standard AMG Ride Control Sport Suspension includes three-stage damping for exceptionally good road-holding. Even with the traction/stability control turned off it delivered good mechanical grip, only stepping out at the rear when pushed ultra-hard and then doing so with wonderful predictability.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
Rear seat roominess and comfort is great.

If you’ve never taken the opportunity to drive something as fast and capable as the C 43 you’ll be amazed at this compact wagon’s command of the road. This includes stopping power due to a racetrack-ready AMG Performance Braking system featuring perforated 360 mm rotors and grey-painted four-piston fixed calipers in front, and a solid set of 320 mm rotors in back. Astute readers may have noticed I said perforated instead of cross-drilled, and my words were chosen carefully because the C 43’s front discs are actually cast with holes from the onset in order to add strength and improve heat resistance. This process results in extremely good braking prowess, even when laying into them too hard and too often during high-speed performance driving. I’d say they’re the next best thing to carbon-ceramic brakes, although they feel nicer for day-in-day-out use.

As fun as the AMG C 43 is to drive, let’s not forget that it’s five-door layout makes it extremely practical. It’s spacious in front with a driver’s seat that was as comfortable as any in the D-segment, while the rear seats provide good support and plenty of space for stretching out the legs. A folding centre armrest includes pop-out cupholders along with a shallow storage bin, or if you need to load long cargo in back take note the centre portion of the C’s 40/20/40-split rear seatback can be lowered. Additionally, the rear seats flip forward automatically by way of two electric buttons, making the C 43 as convenient to live with as it’s brilliantly fun to drive. In the end, cargo capacity can be expanded from 460 to 1,480 litres, which means that it’s luggage volume sits between the GLA- and new GLB-Class subcompacts.

2020 Mercedes-AMG C43 4Matic Wagon
Second-row seatbacks that fold 40/20/40 mean that rear passengers can enjoy the window seats when long cargo is stored down the middle.

It truly is cool to be practical, at least if you’re driving an AMG C 43 Wagon. All of Mercedes-Benz’ AMG wagons deliver big on spacious, comfortable, luxurious performance, not to mention prestige, so the fact that Mercedes is now offering up to $5,000 in additional incentives on 2020 C-Class models is impressive.

To learn more go to our 2020 Mercedes-Benz C-Class Canada Prices page where you can find out about all C-Class body styles, trims, packages and standalone options, and then build the car you’re interested in. What’s more, a CarCostCanada membership will fully prepare you before even speaking with your Mercedes retail representative, by informing you about any available manufacturer rebates, financing and/or leasing deals, and dealer invoice pricing (the price the dealer pays for the car before marking it up), which means you’ll be able to negotiate the best deal possible.

Right now most Mercedes-Benz dealers will bring the car you’re interested in to your home so you can so you can test it without having to go to the dealership, and don’t worry as the entire car will have been sterilized before you poke around inside and take it for a drive. Considering the incentives available for the AMG C 43 Wagon and just how impressive it is overall, you may want to take them up on that.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo Editing: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline Road Test

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
Updated just last year, the Golf Alltrack is going away too early.

As part of collecting data for this review I searched through every Ontario, BC and Alberta Volkswagen dealer site I could find, at which point I realized they were stuck with a much higher number of 2019 models than other brands (I’ve been doing this a lot for most brands lately). This, of course, should be beneficial to anyone purchasing a VW right now, as they would’ve already had a lot of stock they’d want to get rid of before the virus arrived, and must be seriously motived now.

One of the cars on VW’s list of leftovers is the 2019 Golf Alltrack, which was also discontinued last year, so they’re even more motivated to sell their remaining inventory. I’m guessing the dealers are more motivated than Volkswagen Canada, however, as the manufacturer has only put $1,500 in additional incentives on the hood, so to speak, this according to the 2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Canada Prices page right here on CarCostCanada.

When you sign up for a CarCostCanada membership you have access to the 2019 Golf Alltrack’s dealer invoice price, which means you’ll know exactly what your local VW retailer paid for it and potentially how far he or she is willing to discount it. You’ll also know about any manufacturer rebates and financing/lease rate deals currently available.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
Wholly practical yet still fun to drive, the Alltrack takes Golf traditions to new heights.

Getting the best deal on a car is important, but getting the best car for your lifestyle is even more so. To that end the Golf Alltrack is a car I’d actually consider owning, as it suits me to a tee. To my eyes it’s attractive, even more so than the Golf SportWagen it’s based on. That model gets discontinued after the 2019 model year too, incidentally. The Golf Alltrack’s one-inch taller ride height and beefier body cladding work ideally with its long, angular body, while all of its aluminum-look trim, including stylish silver side mirror housings, give it a near-premium persona.

As with all new Golf-based models, the Alltrack’s interior is arguably its most impressive attribute. Luxury details abound, like cloth-wrapped A pillars, a pliable composite dash top that extends down to the midpoint of the instrument panel, the same soft-touch synthetic used for the front door uppers, an beautifully detailed leather-clad flat-bottom sport steering wheel with wonderfully thin spokes filled with high-quality switchgear, stylish grey carbon-fibre-like dash and door trim, gloss-black highlights in key areas, and a nice assortment of satin-finish metallic accents elsewhere.

The monochromatic multi-information display (MID) positioned between the otherwise legible gauge cluster wasn’t very advanced when testing this car in 2017 and still isn’t, especially from a brand that makes an ultra-impressive fully digital primary display in some of its other models, while the majority of its compact crossover competitors provide full-colour TFT MIDs stock full of features in their most basic trims.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
Full LED headlights, LED fog lamps, 18-inch alloys and cool aluminum-look trim, the Alltrack Execline is an impressive near-luxury crossover.

On a much more positive note, the Alltrack’s standard infotainment system is excellent, this Execline model and the base Highline trim replacing the old outdated 6.5-inch centre touchscreen with a much more up-to-date 8.0-inch display for 2019, once again complete with Android Auto, Apple CarPlay and MirrorLink smartphone integration, and a larger more useful reverse camera (but oddly with static guidelines), while the Execline gets exclusive navigation with nice map graphics and accurate route guidance.

Yet more infotainment features include voice recognition, Bluetooth phone and streaming audio, a great sounding nine-speaker Fender audio system replacing the standard six-speaker unit, satellite radio, various apps, car system features, and more, while the display’s cool factor is proximity-sensing tech that causes hidden digital buttons to pop up when your hand gets near.

Being that I mentioned updates from the 2017 model I reviewed back in the day, I should provide some history as well as a few additional changes made over the past two model years. The Alltrack arrived on the scene in 2016 for the 2017 model year, and was actually refreshed for 2018 with LED signature lights in both its base halogen headlights and upgraded full LEDs, while new LED tail lamps also featured their own signature style and VW updated the front and rear fascias so subtly I couldn’t tell the difference (but the press release said it so it must be true).

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
Interior refinement is excellent for the class, and its feature set in Execline trim is very generous.

There were no changes from the 2018 to 2019 model, including the previous year’s available six-speed manual gearbox that wasn’t part of the 2017 lineup in Canada, while Execline trim now included paddles for shifting the optional six-speed DSG dual-clutch automatic.

The unique Peacock Green Metallic colour seen on my tester was new for 2018 too, pulled up to 2019 as well, as was White Silver Metallic that increased the total colour count to nine. My tester’s interior was done out in no-cost optional Shetland beige, always a good combination with green, although this colour can also be had with standard Titan Black.

VW makes every colour available in either Highline or Execline trim, the base model available from $31,200 plus freight and fees when suited up with the manual transmission or $1,400 more for the autobox, whereas Execline trim starts at $35,270 for the manual and $36,670 with the automated transmission, less the previously noted incentives and any additional discounts you’re able to negotiate after getting up to speed on dealer invoice pricing right here at CarCostCanada.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
From a brand that offers some of its models with fully digital gauge clusters, these old-school instruments seem a bit dated.

Execline trim adds an inch to the alloy wheels for an exclusive set of 18-inch rims wrapped in 225/40 all-season tires, while additional standard equipment includes LED headlamps with dynamic cornering, those paddle shifters with automatic I mentioned earlier, a navigation system, an SD card slot, the already praised Fender audio system (with a subwoofer), front sport seats, a 12-way power driver’s seat with two-way power lumbar (that are truly excellent), and leather upholstery.

My test model also included the Golf Alltrack Execline’s only available upgrade package dubbed Driver Assistance Plus for $1,750. It features autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian monitoring, blind spot detection with rear cross-traffic alert, lane keeping assist, automatic high beams, adaptive cruise control with stop and go, and park assist with park distance control.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
Both Golf Alltrack trims get a new 8.0-inch touchscreen with loads of features, while top-tier Execline trim also includes navigation.

Items pulled up to the Execline from base Highline trim include 4Motion all-wheel drive, auto on/off headlamps with coming and leaving capability, fog lights, silver finished side mirror housings, silver roof rails, proximity keyless entry with pushbutton ignition, rain-sensing wipers, power windows, the previously noted leather-rimmed multifunction steering wheel, a leather-wrapped shift knob and handbrake lever, simulated carbon fibre decorative trim, brushed stainless steel pedals, two-zone auto HVAC, a USB port, three-way heated front seats, a two-way powered front passenger seat (that’s also eight-way manually adjustable), an auto-dimming centre mirror, ambient lighting, LED reading lights, illuminated vanity mirrors, a large power panoramic sunroof with a power sunshade made from an opaque cloth, a scrolling rear cargo cover, 12- and 115-volt power outlets in the cargo area, 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks with a centre pass-through, etcetera.

The Golf Alltrack is identical to past models mechanically, with the 2019 once again getting VW’s 1.8-litre turbo-four capable of 170 horsepower and 199 lb-ft of torque. It produces robust yet smooth, linear power that results in a fairly fast sprint from standstill to highway speeds, and once on the freeway potent passing power, while its all-wheel drive system is ideal for rain, snow, and light-duty dirt and gravel roads.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
The hip-hugging 12-way powered leather-surfaced driver’s seat is ultra-comfortable and plenty supportive.

The Alltrack is rated at 11.1 L/100km city, 7.8 highway and 9.6 combined when mated to its base manual transmission, or 10.7 city, 8.0 highway and 9.4 combined with its automated gearbox, which are both reasonably good results for a compact crossover.

The Golf Alltrack rides on the compact segment’s usual front MacPherson strut and rear independent multi-link suspension design, and thanks to VW’s expertise this results in a comfortable ride and even better handling. Its one-inch taller ride height that comes from a special set of springs and shocks, helps the former attribute to make sense, because increased suspension travel normally aids ride comfort, and while the regular Golf SportWagen will likely outshine the Alltrack through the slalom the taller wagon is certainly more capable through such cones than an equivalently sized crossover SUV. The Alltrack’s speed-sensitive power steering provides good response and better than average feel, while a set of 286 mm vented front and 272 mm solid rear brake discs brings all the fun to a stop quickly.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
Let there be light! The Alltrack’s panoramic sunroof provides a lot of airy openness.

Ride and handling praise will be nothing new to those who read VW Golf reviews, but the big difference between the regular five-door hatchback and this Alltrack, or for that matter its SportWagen donor model, is cargo volume. Specifically, the two longer Golfs receive 368 litres (13.0 cubic feet) of extra capacity behind the 60/40-split rear seatbacks, and 362 (12.8 cu ft) more when lowered, the bigger two cars’ max cargo volume a respective measuring 861 and 1,883 litres (30.4 and 66.5 cu ft).

All Golfs include the convenience of a rear centre pass-through as well, making it easy to load in longer items like skis, poles, snowboards, 2x4s or what-have-you. This leaves the two more comfortable rear window seats available for passengers to enjoy. Also good, VW has added levers to each cargo wall for lowering those seatbacks automatically, but before doing you’ll want to remove the cargo cover within its ultimately over-engineered cross-member. Seriously, this part metal, part composite component weighs a lot more than you’re probably expecting, which is good if you want it to last for time and all eternity, yet maybe not so much if your muscles aren’t as toned as Patrik Baboumian’s (strongest man in Germany, just in case you were wondering).

Hopefully you won’t have any problem lifting the manual rear hatch because VW doesn’t offer a powered liftgate, but there is some extra stowage area below the load floor atop the space saver spare tire. Loads in mind, the Alltrack can manage 14 more kilos (31 lbs) of payload than the regular Golf, resulting in 459 kg (1,012 lbs) max.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
The rear seats are comfortable and there’s a lot of space in back to stretch out.

Just in case you’re considering the Alltrack instead of VW’s own Tiguan compact SUV, the Golf Alltrack is about 73 litres (2.6 cu ft) less spacious behind its rear seatbacks, however it can haul an extra 23 litres (0.8 litres) when those seats are folded down, which is pretty impressive when considering the Tiguan is one of the compact segment’s only three-row SUVs.

While the Tiguan is one of the more enjoyable compact SUVs to drive, I must admit to preferring the Golf Alltrack on the road. It’s cabin is finished to a higher standard as well, but all of that hardly matters now that this impressive German wagon is being phased out and the Tiguan will likely replace all collective Golf models as Canada’s top seller soon.

The recently redesigned Tiguan became 42.7 percent more popular year-over-year in calendar year 2018, growing to 21,449 unit sales, coming close to upstaging the Golf that edged it out by just 28 units. It took six different Golf models to achieve that tally, mind you, including the regular Golf hatchback, Golf GTI, Golf R, e-Golf, Golf SportWagen, and this Golf Alltrack. Calendar year 2019 saw Tiguan deliveries drop by 10.2 percent to 19,250 units from a previous high mark, whereas the Golf lost 8.4 percent to 19,668 examples through 2019. With the Golf Alltrack and SportWagen soon gone from the lineup, the Tiguan may potentially outsell the Golf range, although the way sales are looking right now due to the COVID-19 outbreak, 2020 won’t be a stellar year either way.

2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Execline
The long Golf Alltrack provides loads of cargo space, while a centre pass-through means rear passengers get window seats even when loading in long items like skis.

Still, it’s a good year to purchase a Golf Alltrack, and probably the only year you’ll be able to get a new one (unless a straggler or two manages to remain unsold until 2021). While I happen to believe it’s one of the best compact crossovers on the market, before you call your local VW retailer or connect with someone online, please do your homework at CarCostCanada first. Remember, a CarCostCanada membership will provide you a full 2019 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack report with information about manufacturer rebates, financing and leasing deals, plus best of all, dealer invoice pricing that could literally save you thousands when negotiating your best deal.

As for spending time behind the wheel, most dealers will bring the car you’re interested in to your home so you can take it for a drive, after fully disinfecting it of course. If you ask them to bring you the latest Golf Alltrack, I feel fairly confident you’ll like it.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door Road Test

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
Despite being three years into this current fifth-generation, the Impreza still looks very good.

Canada’s compact car class is amazingly competitive, but due to regularly enhancing its exterior design, massive improvements in cabin refinement, major gains made to its infotainment systems, and never-ending faith in its unique horizontally-opposed powertrain that connects through to standard all-wheel drive, Subaru has kept its Impreza wholly relevant at a time when competitors are cancelling their small cars.

News of discontinued models never goes over well with auto enthusiasts, even if the car in question is a rather mundane econobox. After all, the same marketplace sentiment that caused General Motors to axe the Chevrolet Cruze and its Volt EV counterpart is also responsible for the elimination of the Ford Focus along with its two sportiest trim lines, not to mention the once fun-to-drive Alfa Romeo-based Dodge Dart a few of years back. And these four are merely in the compact class; with many others falling by the wayside in the subcompact and full-size passenger car segments as well, all making way for new crossover SUVs and electric vehicles.

Subaru produces a full sleight of crossovers, its best-selling model being the Crosstrek that’s based on the Impreza 5-Door in this review. I happen to like that innovative little CUV very much, but I’m also a fan of compact wagons, which is pretty well what the Impreza 5-Door is.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The 5-Door is the sportiest of the two body styles.

We can call it a hatchback or maybe a liftback to make it seem sportier, but in reality the Impreza 5-Door is a compact wagon. Without doubt someone in Subaru Canada’s marketing division would rather I didn’t call it that, but they should also be aware enough to know this Japanese brand has a faithful following of wagon lovers. The Outback is little more than a lifted Legacy Wagon after all, the five-door Legacy unfortunately no longer available in our market.

The Impreza’s styling was improved with its most recent redesign in 2016, and it truly looks more upscale, even in its less expensive trim lines. This Sport model get fog lights and LED-enhanced headlamps even though it’s merely a mid-range trim, not to mention extended side sills, a discreet rear rooftop spoiler, and stylish LED tail lamps, while machine-finish double-Y-spoke 17-inch alloy wheels with black-painted pockets underpin the sophisticated look.

Subaru produces the Impreza in two body styles, the second being a 4-Door sedan, but this 5-Door is the more popular option in the Canadian market. Both look good and serve their purpose well, and by that I don’t just mean the satisfaction of personal tastes, as the four-door provides the security of being able to lock valuables away in a trunk, and the five-door has more room for loading cargo. The sedan’s trunk can only carry 348 litres of gear, which while not all that bad for a compact sedan is nowhere near as accommodating as a hatchback. Case in point, the Impreza 5-Door’s 588 litres of cargo carrying capacity behind the second row of seats makes it much more useful, and that usefulness only gets better when dropping its 60/40-split rear seatbacks down to open up 1,565 litres of available space.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The sport gets fog lamps and 17-inch alloy wheels.

The model tested for this review was a 2019, and yes I’m quite aware that the 2020 Impreza is already available, and therefore this review won’t be helpful for very long. Still, consumers willing to opt for a 2019 Impreza can save up to $2,500 in additional incentives (at the time of writing), as seen right here on our 2019 Subaru Impreza Canada Prices page, while folks wanting the updated 2020 Impreza can only access up to $750 in additional incentives, unless of course they become CarCostCanada members and take advantage of dealer invoice pricing that can save them thousands.

For 2020, Subaru is making its EyeSight suite of advanced driver assistance systems standard with Imprezas featuring automatic transmissions, but take note that EyeSight is only available with this Sport trim and the top-line Sport-tech model for 2019. The car tested didn’t include the advanced features, which means that it was missing pre-collision braking, pre-collision brake assist, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure warning, lane sway warning, lane keep assist, lead vehicle start alert, and adaptive cruise control. Subaru is making its Starlink connected services package available for 2020 too, and it’s included with most Impreza trims, while the new model’s styling has been updated on 4- and 5-Door body styles.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
Cabin quality and design is really impressive.

Nothing changes with respect to trim lines from 2019 to 2020, with the Impreza’s four trims remaining Convenience, Touring, Sport and Sport-tech. Model year 2019 4-Door pricing ranges from $19,995 to $30,195, whereas the 5-Door can be had from $20,895 to $31,095. The Impreza’s base price stays the same for 2020, but some pricing in between increases, with the new 5-Door adding $100 to its new $20,995 base price, and the top-line Sport-tech trim costing $30,795 for the 4-Door and $31,695 for the 5-Door.

The 2019 Impreza Sport 5-Door being reviewed here has a retail price of $25,395, but take note the new 2020 version will increase its price to $26,195. Like its two lesser siblings the Sport can be had with a five-speed manual transmission or an available Lineartronic CVT (continuously variable transmission) with standard steering wheel shift paddles, the latter how Subaru upgraded my test car. As usual, the brand’s Symmetrical AWD is standard equipment, which not only makes the Impreza the only car to feature standard AWD in the compact segment, but also one of the only vehicles in this class with available AWD period.

To clarify, Mazda recently showed up with AWD for its compact 3, while the latest Toyota Prius now can be had with an electrified e-AWD setup. VW will offer its Golf Alltrack crossover wagon until it sells out (sadly it’s been discontinued), but to be fair it’s more of a Crosstrek challenger as it is, while the brand’s Golf R competes directly with the Subaru WRX STI.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The dash gets a very impressive contrast stitched leatherette facing.

Volkswagen in mind, am I the only one to find it odd that this relatively small Japanese automaker has managed to keep the German brand’s horizontally opposed engine design relevant for all of these decades? Subaru has long made the boxer configuration its own, now sharing it only with Porsche and, occasionally, Ferrari, with its newest 2.0-litre, DOHC, 16-valve four producing a dependable 152 horsepower and 145 lb-ft of torque by means of direct injection, dual active valve control, and electronic throttle control. This is considerably more engine output than most rivals’ base engines, with in fact just three competitors make more power, and then not much more, plus just four putting out greater torque.

On the road, the Impreza performs strongly in a straight line, from a standing start all the way up to highway speeds. Its torquey engine works really well with the CVT that provides particularly smooth, linear power, while the paddle shifters are helpful when downshifting mid-corner. Still, the engine and transmission combination worked best when left on its own. Also smooth, Impreza’s ride is excellent, while its capability through the curves is typical of its fully independent front strut and rear double wishbone suspension layout, improved with stabilizer bars at each end.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
This simple gauge cluster is easy to read under any light.

The Impreza therefore offers up a more sophisticated suspension setup than a number of its peers that incorporate less expensive torsion bar designs in back, and this is truly noticeable when driving it hard through fast-paced corners on less than ideal stretches of pavement. Instead of experiencing the rear end hopping over the uneven tarmac, my tester’s 205/50R17 all-seasons remained planted on course, the little wagon making its rally race-bred heritage apparent through each and every turn.

This was when I looked down at my tester’s centre console and longed for the standard five-speed manual gearbox, as it would have been more fun to drive and likely quicker as well, but as it was the paddle shifters worked well when more revs were required, even though they come hooked up to a CVT. It worked well enough, actually, that I’d even consider choosing the CVT if this one was staying in my personal collection, not only because it’d make city driving easier, but also because the automatic is better on fuel, with an estimated rating of just 8.3 L/100km in the city, 6.4 on the highway and 7.5 combined, compared to 10.1 city, 7.5 highway and 8.9 combined for the manual.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The multi-information display atop the dash comes loaded with features.

While a great car to drive, the Impreza is wonderfully comfortable too, and not only because of its smooth ride. The front seats provide very good adjustability, but oddly the driver’s seat doesn’t have any lumbar adjustment in Sport trim. The seat is inherently supportive, thankfully, and due to plenty of reach from the tilt and telescoping steering column it was easy for me to get myself into an ideal driving position for good control of the leather-clad steering wheel and metal sport pedals. The steering wheel’s rim is shaped perfectly for a comfortable feel, while all the switchgear needed to control its audio, phone, cruise, and trip/multi-information display systems are on its spokes.

Unlike the majority of challengers, the Impreza’s mostly analogue instrument cluster simply divides its primary dials with a coloured TFT display for speed, gear selection, real-time fuel economy, the fuel level, plus the odometer and trip mileage readouts. Alternatively, Subaru houses the full multi-information display in a hooded 4.2-inch colour monitor on top of the centre dash. It incorporates a lot of information, with its top half-inch portion showing a digital clock, interior temperature reading, climate control settings, and the outside temperature, while the larger lower section can be organized as per a driver’s preference, with the options being audio system info, real-time fuel economy and projected range, all-wheel drive power distribution, a row of three digital gauges including water temperature, oil temperature and average speed, plus more.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The larger 8.0-inch touchscreen is superb.

The multi-information display’s quality of graphics and display resolution has made big gains this generation, but Subaru’s most impressive upgrades in recent years have been made to over in-car infotainment, specifically the main touchscreen on the centre stack, plus and host of functions. Choosing Sport trim means the centre display increases in size from 6.3 to 8.0 inches, while it’s also an ultra high-quality touchscreen with clear definition, beautifully vibrant colours, and wonderfully rich contrasts. Subaru’s tile design is attractive, with big colourful “buttons” overtop a starry blue background that-style graphic layout looks good and is really easy to operate, with its main features being radio, media, phone, apps, settings, and the automaker’s Starlink suite of apps. Navigation isn’t part of Sport trim, but Android Auto and Apple CarPlay is, and by integrating your smartphone can provide route guidance. The apps panel features Aha and iHeartRadio, plus two USB ports and an auxiliary plug provide smartphone connectivity. The reverse camera is good too, benefiting from active guidelines.

All heating, ventilation and air conditioning controls are located on a dedicated interface just under the centre display, while single-zone automatic climate control comes standard with Sport. It operates via three dials and two buttons, but don’t look there for the two-way seat heaters that get controlled via a pair of rocker switches on the lower console. This said, even in their hottest settings they don’t feel anywhere near therapeutic.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
These sport seats are truly supportive.

Subaru doesn’t provide a heatable steering wheel rim in Sport trim, which was a disappointment, but not as disappointing as not being able to get rear seat heaters in any trim at all. This is unusual for a car that would make an excellent family ski conveyance during the coldest season, but just the same the Impreza Sport 5-Door’s rear quarters were nicely furnished, although strangely without secondary air vents.

It’s plenty spacious in the rear passenger compartment, however, with about eight inches of room ahead of my knees when I sat behind the driver’s position that was set up for my five-foot-eight, short-torso, long-legged body type. I also had plenty of space to stretch my legs out with my feet below the front seat, while there was ample side-to-side either room along with a nice wide folding centre armrest with the usual two cupholders integrated within. Finally, I had approximately three inches of air space over my head, making the back seat a viable option for six-footers. The rear window seats also provide good lower back support, which I suppose makes it easier to look past the rear quarter’s lack of amenities.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
The rear seating area is very spacious and the outboard seats are comfortable.

Speaking of the seats, my Sport trim tester’s cloth upholstery is mighty attractive, made up of a sharp looking patterned insert flanked by grey bolsters featuring contrast stitching. I have to say, every Impreza generation makes major strides in cabin refinement, with this most recent fifth-gen model a much more inviting place for driver and passengers with respect to materials quality and overall styling. One look at the contrast-stitched, leather-like pliable composite dash top and you’ll be impressed, this easily as good as this compact segment gets. The high-end surface treatment even flows down the right side of the centre stack and gets duplicated on the left section as well. It’s stunning.

The door uppers get a similarly soft synthetic covering whereas the armrests felt like real stitched leather. Subaru spruces things up further by adding carbon-fibre-like inlays, satin-silver/grey accents, chrome embellishment and more, while the interior buttons, knobs and switches are fitted tightly throughout the interior.

2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport 5-Door
There’s no shortage of space in the 5-Door’s cargo compartment.

I’ve already spoken about the cargo compartment’s impressive capacity, with its average amount of space behind the rear seats and better-the-average volume when they’re flattened, but I wish Subaru had included a 40/20/40-split instead of the 60/40 divide, or at least a centre pass-through. I know owners in this class are used to squishing their rear passengers into the 60-percent portion when loading longer items like skis in back, but there’s a much more elegant way that Subaru should adopt in order to further differentiate itself from most compact rivals. The Impreza does include a retractable cargo cover for hiding valuables, and it’s housed within a well-made, good looking aluminum cross-member that’s easy to remove.

All in all, I could see myself owning an Impreza 5-Door at some point, if I ever choose to give up this career and am forced to purchase a new car. It’s an ideal size for me, provides enjoyable performance and agreeable comfort combined with good fuel economy, is rated highly from a reliability standpoint, and is much more refined than many in this class. I like that its infotainment system is now in the top 10-percent of this segment, and even though I would have appreciated some additional features in my Sport test model, I drove a top-tier Sport-tech version couple of years ago and found it even more appealing than this model. All things said, the Impreza is a car you should consider seriously.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited Road Test

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Subaru’s Outback is not only just as practical as most mid-size crossover SUVs, but it can out-perform the majority off-road too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Subaru has long provided a nicely balanced lineup of performance-oriented yet practical cars and crossover SUVs, with the Outback not only typifying this ideal, but together with the smaller compact Crosstrek it actually bridges the gap between family wagon and sport utility.

The Outback’s best of both world’s design means that it’s always been a strong seller for Subaru, but I think it would do even better if more mid-size crossover SUV buyers knew just how roomy it is inside. Despite its lower overall height, the Outback’s 1,005 litres (35.5 cubic feet) of dedicated cargo capacity and 2,075 litres (73.3 cubic feet) of space when the rear row is flattened is much more capable of swallowing up gear than Nissan’s Murano and Chevy’s new Blazer, while it’s on par with Ford’s Edge, Hyundai’s Santa Fe, and even Jeep’s off-road dominating Grand Cherokee.

Subaru could make it even more accommodating if they’d offer a second-row centre pass-through, mind you, or better yet 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks like some premium European brands, but the Outback does include a convenient set of cargo wall-mounted levers for laying its 60/40-split seats flat automatically, while a nice retractable cargo cover and rugged available cargo mat make it a perfect companion for the majority of family hauling duties such as carting four individuals plus their ski/snowboard gear up to the slopes.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
In today’s crossover SUV world, the Outback stands out for being different. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

That’s when you’ll be glad for the Outback’s standard all-wheel drive, and that it’s not just any AWD system. Subaru’s Symmetrical AWD is well respected for providing an even distribution of torque to each wheel and more even weight distribution overall, not to mention a lower centre of gravity due to its lineup of horizontally opposed “boxer” engines. I’ve been test driving Outbacks since I started covering the automotive industry two decades ago, and I even spent a week in a near identical (other than colour) 2018 Outback 3.6R Limited last year, so I’ve experienced how well its AWD system works in tandem with its standard electronic traction and stability control systems to deliver go-near-anywhere capability in almost any weather condition.

Of course, the Outback is capable of climbing out of much deeper snow than the mere wisp of white surrounding our test vehicle, with many of my weeklong tests including stints up the mountain trudging through thickly blanketed snow sport parking lots and a number of trips up country to visit family, where its family of flat four- and six-cylinder engines always provided strong highway performance and enough torque to dig the car out of deep snow banks.

Back to the here and now, Subaru gave the Outback a mid-cycle update for the 2018 model year, while the Japanese brand is smack dab in the middle of launching its fully redesigned 2020 model as this review gets published, so if you decide to drive on down to your local Subie retailer you’ll probably see the latest version parked in their showroom and a smattering of new 2019s outside on the lot, the latter cars no doubt reduced in price to find homes quickly.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
No matter whether choosing the 2019 or 2020, the Outback is a good looking tall wagon. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

CarCostCanada was reporting up to $3,000 in additional incentives for 2019 Outbacks at the time of writing, while you’ll also find trim, package and option prices there, as well as rebate information and even dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when you sit down to negotiate, therefore you really should consider a 2019 unless you really want the updated version.

Choosing the new replacement Outback or soon to be replaced model shouldn’t solely be up to finances, unless budget limitations demand, but I still don’t see most buyers of the 2020 version sold merely on styling. After all, while they’re obviously different when seen side-by-side, the updated model is no radical departure. In fact, I’d say it’s actually less rugged looking at a time when most car-based crossover SUVs are working overtime to pretend otherwise.

Inside, it gets the mainstream volume sector’s largest centre touchscreen at 11.6 inches, positioned vertically instead of horizontal, as with this 2019 model’s still amply sized 8.0-inch touchscreen. I won’t go into too much detail about the 2020 model, being that I haven’t tested one yet, but suffice to say the new centre display could very well make moving into the latest Outback worthwhile all on its own.

Then again, I could see someone choosing a 2019 Outback just to acquire my test model’s wonderful 3.6-litre six-cylinder engine, which is sadly on its way out of the entire Subaru lineup. It has recently only been available in upper-crust Outbacks and top-tier versions of the brand’s Legacy mid-size sedan, but the advent of Subaru’s new Ascent mid-size three-row crossover SUV last year, and its lack of H6 power, initially signified an uncertain end to six-cylinder performance within blue-oval, silver star products, and now the 2020 Legacy and Outback have confirmed such.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Many of the Outback Limited’s details are very upscale. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Looking back, Subaru’s flat-six came into being as an option for the 1988–1991 XT (Alcyone VX) sports coupe, and was based on the brand’s four-cylinder of the time. It was upgraded for that model’s successor, the 1991–1996 SVX (Alcyone), a car I tested and was thoroughly impressed by way back in ’94. Next came the EZ30, which was a complete engine redesign notably nearly as compact as the EJ25 four-cylinder of the era, the smaller 3.0-litre version being optional in Legacy/Outback models from 2002/2001-2008/2009, and the almost identically sized yet more formidable 3.6-litre EZ36 available optionally for respective 2009 and 2010 models. Both versions of the EZ were used for the new Ascent’s three-row crossover SUV predecessor, incidentally, the 2006-2007 Tribeca integrating the smaller version and 2008-2014 versions using the bigger engine.

As it is, 2019 Outback engines include a base 2.5-litre four-cylinder good for 175 horsepower and 174 lb-ft of torque, plus the 3.6-litre H6 I’ve already talked about a length, except for output figures that measure up to 256 horsepower and 247 lb-ft of torque. For 2020, the entry-level 2.5i gets a total overhaul including 90 percent of its components replaced for 6 more horsepower and 2 lb-ft of additional torque, which now equal 182 horsepower and 176 lb-ft of torque, while the aforementioned Ascent’s new 2.4-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine is optional as is its impressive 260 horsepower and 277 lb-ft of torque, which equals a small increase of 4 horsepower yet a robust 30 lb-ft of added torque over the old six-cylinder engine.

As you might expect, the updated 2020 engines are more efficient than their predecessors too, with the current 2019 Outback 2.5i achieving an estimated 9.4 L/100km city, 7.3 highway and 8.5 combined compared to 9.0, 7.1 and 8.0 for the new 2020 base engine, which is an obvious gain, while the 2019 Outback 3.6R manages a claimed 12.0 L/100km city, 8.7 highway and 10.5 combined rating compared to a much thriftier 10.1, 7.9 and 9.0 respectively for the new turbo-four. While Subaru certainly deserves credit for delivering such major gains in both efficiency and performance, I’ll miss the six-cylinder’s smooth, refined operation and throatier growl at higher revs.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
If you need to haul cargo on the roof, the Outback’s roof rails are heavy duty. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The brand’s High-Torque Lineartronic CVT (continuously variable transmission) is smooth too, and thanks to its ability to shift through its eight forward “gears” just like a conventional automatic, even via steering wheel paddle shifters, it’s relatively sporty as well. Then again, when revs climb higher it’s not quite as convincing as a sport model, which meant I didn’t end up using those paddles as much as I would normally have.

Either way the Outback 3.6R is no slouch off the line and fully capable of passing slower traffic on the freeway or better yet, a winding two-lane highway, and to that end it’s a pretty good handler too, even when pushed through tight curves at high speeds, but this said it’s no WRX STI. Of course, few vehicles can keep up to Subaru’s most famous performance model, let alone tall wagons primarily designed for comforting their occupants. Its comfort-oriented attitude is why I left the Outback’s super-smooth transmission is Drive and just enjoyed the ride more often than not. Its suspension is wonderfully compliant, making it perfect for managing rough backcountry roads and trips to the ski hill, plus of course overcoming some of the worst trails anywhere, those dreaded inner-city lanes.

If I were to claim Subaru’s standard full-time symmetrical all-wheel drive as the best AWD system in the mainstream industry I wouldn’t be alone, especially when factoring in “X-MODE” that controls the engine’s output, the transmission’s shift points, the AWD system’s torque-split, plus the braking and hill descent control systems so as to overachieve when off the beaten path. Obviously the Outback won’t walk away from a Jeep Wrangler on a level 8 or 9 trail (it wouldn’t even make it five feet on a level 8 or 9 trail), but its highly advanced AWD system and better than average 220 mm (8.7 inches) of ground clearance give it an advantage over most car-based crossover competitors when the going get tough.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Good looking, highly refined Outback Limited cabin provides most everything a luxury buyer wants and more. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I’m sure you can imagine that I’m intrigued by the new 2020 Outback and want to get behind the wheel, something I’ll be doing next week. Of course, its bigger centre touchscreen will be impressive, and I’m guessing Subaru will make improvements in refinement as well. Nevertheless it’ll need to be particularly good to beat the current model’s near premium details, such as fabric-wrapped A-pillars, soft synthetic dash-top and instrument panel that’s contrast-stitched and continues all the way down each side of the centre stack, padded door uppers, inserts and armrests front to back, and its leather upholstery with contrast stitching in my near top-line Limited tester.

The Outback Limited’s leather-clad steering wheel looks and feels great, the latter thanks to ideally shaped thumb spats. The comprehensive switchgear on the 9 and 3 o’clock spokes are high-quality too, while all of the interior’s buttons, knobs and switches are good, with the audio and two-zone auto HVAC dials on the centre stack especially so.

Some of Subaru’s biggest gains in recent years have been in the electronics department, with this 2019 Outback not as mind-blowing as the 2020 model, but still on par with rivals. Both 2019 and 2020 models utilize relatively conventional primary gauge clusters sporting a circular analogue tachometer and speedometer to the sides of a tall, vertical multi-information display (MID), but the 2020 car waves goodbye to the sportier dual-binnacle motorbike-like gauge design now in use, for a much more conventional look that I find a tad disappointing when focused on base trims, but this said the 2019 model’s 5.0-inch optional MID can now be upgraded to a full 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster in the 2020 car.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Complex gauge clusters like this will soon become a thing of the past. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

What this means for those interested in the outgoing 2019 Outback, particularly in Limited and Premier trims, is a gauge cluster that’s hardly more exciting than what you’ll find in more basic 2.5i, Convenience and Touring models, but the base 3.5-inch MID gets replaced by a significantly better colour 5.0-inch version when EyeSight gets added to the mix (I’ll talk about EyeSight shortly), but turn your eyes to the centre stack and it’s a completely different story.

The most basic 2020 Outbacks start off with a 7.0-inch touchscreen, which is an upgrade from the 2019 model’s 6.5-inch centre monitor, while the top-line 2019 model gets a reasonably large 8.0-inch touchscreen, as noted earlier. I can understand you may have seen something even more impressive if you’ve just stepped out of the updated Outback or something premium from Germany, but my tester’s infotainment interface was still well laid out and plenty attractive due to lots of gloss black surfacing around the touchscreen so that it all blends nicely together as if it’s one oversized display, while the background graphics offer up Subaru’s trademark starlit blue night sky and bright, colourful smartphone/tablet-style candy drop buttons for choosing functions.

The backup camera is very good, helped along by active guidelines, while features include Android Auto, Apple CarPlay and Subaru’s own StarLink smartphone integration. Of course, the usual AM/FM/CD/MP3/WMA audio sources can be found too, plus satellite and Aha radio, USB and aux ports, SiriusXM advanced audio services, SiriusXM Travel Link, and Bluetooth with audio streaming. It all gets funneled through four speakers in lower trims and six speakers in Touring trims and above, while the latter also includes the aforementioned 1.5-inch larger touchscreen and a second USB port.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The 2019 Outback’s infotainment display only looks old when compared to the new 2020 version. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Being that you won’t be able to factory order a 2019 Outback, I won’t delve into all the trim line details, but some as yet mentioned features found in my Limited trimmed test model include 18-inch alloy wheels, auto on/off LED headlights with steering-responsive capability, fog lights, welcome and approach lights, proximity keyless access, pushbutton ignition, brushed aluminum front doorsill protectors, authentic looking matte woodgrain and silver metallic interior accents, auto-dimming side and centre mirrors, a heated steering wheel rim, three-way heatable front seats, a navigation/route guidance system, dynamic cruise control, a 10-way powered driver’s seat with power lumbar and two-way memory, a four-way power front passenger’s seat, a universal garage door opener, a great sounding 12-speaker, 576-watt Harman/Kardon audio system, a power glass sunroof, two-way heated rear outboard seats, a power rear tailgate, plus more.

Those EyeSight advanced driver assistance systems mentioned earlier include pre-collision braking, pre-collision brake assistance, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure warning, lane sway warning, lane keep assist, lead vehicle start alert, reverse automatic braking, adaptive cruise control, and auto high beams.

My as-tested Limited 3.6R with the EyeSight tester can be had for $41,395 plus freight and fees, which is $1,500 more than the Limited 3.6R with no EyeSight, while that model is also $3,000 more than Limited trim with the four-cylinder powerplant. A base Outback 2.5i can be purchased for just $29,295, incidentally, while additional 2019 trims include the $32,795 Touring 2.5i and $39,295 Premier 2.5i, the latter trim coming standard with EyeSight. You can upgrade Touring trim with the Eyesight package and engine upgrade, but, no-cost colour choices aside, the flat-six is the only available option with Premier trim.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
There’s no shortage of room in the Outback. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The 2019 Outback’s retail price ranges from $29,295 to $42,295, but take note that up to $3,000 in additional incentives were available at the time of writing, so be sure to check out our 2019 Subaru Outback page for all the details, plus pricing, rebate, and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

As I explained when starting this review, the Outback can manage mid-size SUV-levels of cargo, so as you might expect there’s also ample space for adult passengers in both rows of seats. It’s comfortable too, the front seats ideally shaped for optimal support, particularly at the lower lumbar region, while the side bolsters also support well laterally. The rear seating area is amply large as well, particularly with respect to headroom.

Also important, the rear compartment is just as refined as the front. Along with surface treatments and other details finished nicely, a large armrest flips down from the centre position filled with well designed cupholders that actually hold drinks in place when underway thanks to rubber grips (most are nowhere near as useful), while the backside of the front centre console features a covered compartment with two USB chargers plus an auxiliary plug, as well as a set of rocker switches for the previously noted rear seat heaters and the rear HVAC vents. Rear passengers needing overhead light will appreciate the reading lamps above, while each door panel includes a big bottle holder.

2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Rear seat comfort and roominess is superb. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It seems just about perfect to finish this Subaru Outback review on such a practical subject matter, even after factoring in the premium-like cabin, luxuriously smooth powertrain and equally plush ride. It’s a crossover wagon/SUV that’s actually better than advertised, and that makes it a truly rare commodity. Believe me, you’ll be well served whether you opt for this impressive 2019 Outback or the new 2020 version.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD Road Test Review

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
Volvo’s new V60 takes styling cues from the rest of the Swedish brand’s renewed lineup and mixes in a few of its own elements for a stunning new design. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

If you think the auto industry has given up on cars and is only relying on SUVs to turn a profit, look no further than the thoroughly reinvigorated Volvo brand and its wonderfully renewed lineup of sport wagons and crossover-styled variations on the same five-door theme. 

The first to arrive was the beautiful new V90 and V90 Cross Country duo, both having respectively replaced the old V70 and XC70 for the 2017 model year, albeit the former hasn’t been with us for a decade or so. Fast forward to 2019 and Volvo’s wagon lineup just expanded with all-new 2019 V60 and V60 Cross Country crossover models, and thanks to Volvo’s Canadian PR team leaving the sportier of the two in my driveway for three weeks last month we’ll be starting off closer to the ground. 

I suppose referencing the more conventional V60 as sportier may not sit well with those who consider a trip down a gravel road with a kayak strapped to the top of the V60 Cross Country T5 AWD a more sport-oriented exercise than fast-tracking through a curving two-lane highway at the wheel of our V60 T6 AWD Inscription, not that the former car can’t manage the latter activity quite well, or vise versa. It’s just that the regular V60 is quicker when upgraded with its as-tested turbocharged and supercharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine, and as noted a moment ago sits a bit lower to the ground for better pavement-hugging handling, whereas the raised ride height of the Cross Country allows for greater ground clearance when traversing less hospitable backwater roads and trails. Either way, Volvo has you covered. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
The V60 is unmistakably Volvo from behind, yet there’s nothing else quite like it on the road. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I suppose this is as good a time as any to talk powertrains, being that both V60 models incorporate Volvo’s innovative 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine, the T5 featuring turbocharging and the T6 adding the just-noted supercharger to the mix. The former makes a laudable 258 horsepower and 250 lb-ft of torque for thoroughly enjoyable performance from standstill up to highway speeds and beyond via eight quick-shifting automatic gears and standard all-wheel drive, whereas the latter puts 316 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque down to the road via the same all-wheel drivetrain. 

By the numbers, the V60 T5 AWD allows for an energetic zero to 100km/h sprint of 6.6 seconds and a top speed of 225 km/h (140 mph), whereas the T6 AWD cuts standstill acceleration runs down to 5.7 seconds while upping maximum velocity to 249 km/h (155 mph). 

Volvo’s T6 engine seems to make a more sporting note at full throttle than I last remember, while the zero-to-100 times quoted a moment ago feel as good as they look. The drivetrain is especially engaging when set to Dynamic sport mode via the jeweled switch on the lower console, which heightens the performance of all controls. Bend it into a sharp, fast-pace curve and the V60 immediately takes on the role of unflappable sport wagon, providing an adept level of poise that almost seems too capable when simultaneously taking in its luxurious Inscription-trimmed surroundings. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
The V60’s finer details look even better up close, especially in top-line Inscription trim and wearing these optional 19-inch alloy wheels. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The V60’s cabin is absolutely stunning, which caused me to leave the drive mode selector in Comfort more often than not, and Eco when I was paying attention, which together with auto engine start/stop provided best-possible fuel economy at a claimed 10.9 L/100km city, 7.7 highway and 9.5 combined with the as-tested T6 AWD, or alternatively 10.2, 6.8 and 8.7 for the less potent T5 FWD, and made the most of the impressively smooth ride and wonderfully quiet cabin, ideal for such resplendent accoutrements. 

As already executed to near perfection in the crossover SUV classes, Volvo once again creates the D-segment leader for interior design and execution thanks to the highest grades of materials and the finest attention to detail. From its myriad soft-touch surfaces above the waistline and below, including plush perforated leathers, to its beautifully executed decorative metal accents and matte hardwood inlays, the V60 Inscription provides a richness and elegance that’s been sorely missing from this more compact five-door luxury category. 

Then there’s comfort, which has always been Volvo’s strength. The Inscription seats are superb, and that’s even before making the myriad adjustments they allow for. The seat squabs extend forward, cupping below each knee, while the backrest side bolsters power inward or outward to fit most any body type, whether you want a snuggly hug or more relaxing support. Support in mind, four-way powered lumbar means you can position extra lower back pressure just about anywhere you want it, but surprisingly not all models the V60 competes against offer four-way powered lumbar. Then again some offer powered steering columns, which is not available with the V60, so therefore the Inscription’s two-way memory settings don’t affect the steering wheel, but if it were one or the other I’d optimize seat comfort and control. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
The V60 Inscription’s cabin is exquisitely finished, not to mention wonderfully comfortable and plenty spacious. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Driver setup in mind, the V60’s tilt and telescopic steering column offers ample rake and reach for all bodily forms, my long-legged, short-torso five-foot-eight medium-build frame fully capable of clasping the leather-wrapped steering wheel rim with elbows optimally bent while my legs were easily within reach yet not too crowded by pedals, while plenty of small adjustments remained for tweaking during long road trips. 

Looking forward, the gauge cluster is digital, which is nothing new for the V60 that along with its S60 sibling was one of the first cars in its class to offer a colour TFT display in place of the usual analogue primary instruments. Still, this 12.3-inch driver display, upsized from the base Momentum trim’s 8.0-inch unit, is a much more advanced bit of kit than the old V60’s. In fact, it takes up all available space below the instrument hood, and even better it defaults to the navigation system’s colour map that features 3D building block graphics that are fabulous fun to watch when tooling amongst the high-rises of any downtown core. 

Of course, that map can be shown over on the V60’s standard 9.0-inch vertical centre touchscreen, Volvo’s Sensus interface continuing to be one of the best in the industry. It’s not that it wows with bright colours and exciting graphics, but rather because it’s more tablet-like than any of its rivals and therefore is easier to figure out. It features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, all of the usual gesture controls, 4G LTE in-car Wi-Fi, responds 50 percent faster than earlier versions, although my tester’s otherwise excellent 360-degree surround parking camera was a bit lethargic at startup resulting in fashionably late appearances after I’d finished reversing out of my driveway when leaving in a rush, and thanks to an upgrade to the $3,750 optional 19-speaker 1,400-watt Bowers & Wilkins audio system provided sensational sound quality, while the satellite radio colour album cover graphics were wonderful. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
The available 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster doubles as a 3D navigation map. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Incidentally, that B&W stereo does more than just sound good, it improves the interior design thanks to a lovely little tweeter at dash central, featuring a stylish aluminum grille, while the similarly drilled aluminum door speakers let you see through to coloured cones within. 

Those speaker grilles are surrounded by some of the only hard composite in the entire car, the rest of each door panel soft touch synthetic from top to bottom, excepting the armrest that’s covered in contrast-stitched leather. Likewise for the centre armrest/bin lid, the front edge of the dash top, and the instrument panel just below, which is why I was a bit miffed that Volvo chose not to finish the glove box lid to the same standard, leaving it hard plastic in a segment that normally softens this surface. Volvo leaves the sides of the centre console hard plastic too, but this is more than made up for by a beautiful set of satin-silver framed matte hardwood scroll-top lids for the connectors, tray and cupholders below. 

Volvo chose not to add the same wood to the doors, but surrounding the steering column and just ahead of the front passenger are lovely sculpted sections next to an equally artistic inlay of flowing satin-silver aluminum, the V60’s interior design coming across much more zen-like than anything from Japan, or Germany for that matter. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
Infotainment touchscreen’s don’t come much better than Volvo’s Sensus system, while the V60’s surrounding dash design is stunning. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I could continue on about cabin styling, the volume dial, vent controls, rotating ignition switch and cylindrical drive mode selector rimmed in a grippy diamond-patterned bright metal that sparkles as jewel-like as in any Bentley, while those aforementioned seats are as eye-arresting as sore back-alleviating, but there are still some as yet unmentioned details to cover. 

For one, the V60 is spacious. In fact, I think the new V60 is targeting previous V70 customers just as much as those who loved the outgoing V60, thanks to 124 mm (4.9 inches) more length overall, plus a 9.6-mm (3.8-inch) longer wheelbase that results in the most spacious rear seating area in the luxury D-segment. The new model is 51 mm (2.0 inches) lower than its predecessor too, which adds to its long, sleek visual stance, but nevertheless it provides ample headroom and legroom for a six-foot passenger behind a six-foot driver, although I wasn’t able to substantiate this claim due to my previously noted five-foot-eight height. Nevertheless, I can attest to an obvious increase in cargo space, the new V60 boasting 20 percent more than the outgoing car. 

Reason enough for its growth is Volvo’s new Scalable Product Architecture (SPA) that also underpins the larger V90 sport wagon, not to mention everything else in today’s Volvo lineup other than the compact XC40 crossover. Everything riding on SPA gets regularly praised by owners and auto pundits alike, with aforementioned ride-quality and quietness given near universal accolades, so it only makes sense the V60 delivers to the same high level. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
Bentley? No, just a modern-day Volvo. The V60’s cabin is truly a cut above. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I’ve touched on features throughout this review, but have yet to go into trim details, so without further adieu the base 2019 V60 Momentum T5 FWD starts at just $43,900 plus freight and fees, which is only $50 above than last year’s base V60 yet includes standard LED headlamps, rain-sensing wipers, a powered panoramic glass sunroof, dual-zone auto climate control, leather upholstery, power-adjustable heated front seats with driver’s memory, a powered liftgate, power-folding rear seat headrests, power-folding rear seatbacks with controls in the cargo compartment, a semi-automatic cargo cover that conveniently slides up and out of the way when opening the tailgate, and much more. 

Of course, plenty of safety gear comes standard too, including standard City Safety automatic front collision warning with full low- and high-speed autonomous emergency braking, plus Driver Alert Control, steering support, Run-Off Road Mitigation, Lane Keeping Aid and Oncoming Lane Mitigation, and more. 

Of special note, the new V60 introduces an Oncoming Braking system that, if sensing an imminent head-on collision will automatically actuate maximum braking force two-tenths of a second before impact. This is said to reduce vehicle speed by 10 km/h before impact, which could potentially save lives and certainly minimize injury. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
The V60’s driver’s seat is one of the most comfortable and supportive in the industry. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I won’t go into all standard and optional features available with Momentum or $55,400 Inscription trim, although if interested feel free to check out my previous story that covered everything in detail, but suffice to say the latter as-tested model gets a special chromed waterfall grille, cornering headlights, fog lamps, a really nice leather-wrapped and metal edged key fob, Power Steering Personal Settings with low, medium or high assistance, the gorgeous Driftwood decor inlays, digital gauge cluster and four-way powered lumbar noted earlier, Nappa leather upholstery that’s perforated for allowing through forced ventilation up front, etcetera. 

Option out a V60 Inscription T6 AWD and you can have the same $1,000 19-inch multi-spoke alloys as seen on my test car, the previously noted audio upgrade, $1,300 massaging front seats and a $1,150 graphical head-up display. Additionally, my tester included a $1,250 Climate Package with heated Aquablades windshield wipers, a much-welcome heatable steering wheel, and heated rear seats; a $1,500 Convenience Package with Volvo’s Pilot Assist semi-autonomous drive system that uses the Adaptive Cruise Control, Lane Keeping Aid and other advanced driver assistance features to keep the V60 within its chosen lane, plus a Homelink garage door opener and a compass; plus an $1,800 Vision Package with the aforementioned 360-degree surround parking camera, Park Assist Pilot semi-autonomous self parking, front parking sensors, auto-dimming side mirrors, and blindspot monitoring with rear cross traffic alert. 

And by the way, all 2019 Volvo V60 pricing was sourced right here on CarCostCanada, where you can find detailed pricing on trims, packages and standalone options for every other new vehicle sold in Canada, plus otherwise hard to get rebate information and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

2019 Volvo V60 Inscription T6 AWD
Rear seat roominess and cargo capacity is class leading. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The only V60 attribute that arguably outshines all of the above is exterior styling, which to my eyes makes it the best-looking sport wagon in the compact luxury D-segment, and possibly the most attractive combination of new Volvo design elements to date. I love the shape of the new grille and the way the headlamps flow rearward over the front fenders, not to mention the motorsport-inspired wing strut design of the lower front fascia. Yet most of all I like this wagon’s profile, culminating at two of the most unorthodox taillights on today’s market, the V60’s sharply cut L-shaped lenses paying obvious tribute to Volvo’s recent past, but all-new and totally unique as well. 

It won’t be hard for you to tell that I really like the look of this car, and I must admit to liking everything else about it too. It made the recent holiday season all the more enjoyable and helped ring in the first week of 2019 with style, comfort and all-round class.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press

Copyright: Canadian Auto Press Inc.