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Porsche endows new 2021 Cayenne GTS with twin-turbocharged V8

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS
Porsche has brought back its Cayenne GTS for 2021, complete with twin-turbo V8 power.

Following Porsche’s usual product launch plan, a new Cayenne GTS has surfaced for the 2021 model year, and while this might normally be a small story about blackened trim, Alcantara interior detailing and a lowered suspension, quite a bit has changed since a Cayenne GTS was last offered three years ago.

As many reading this will already be aware, the Cayenne received a ground-up redesign for 2019, and while such would always occur before a new GTS release, this time around there are two third-generation Cayenne body styles instead of just one, including the regular Cayenne and the new Cayenne Coupe, both of which will be available in new GTS trim.

Also new, the two 2021 Cayenne GTS models will be powered by a twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 instead of the outgoing twin-turbocharged 3.6-litre V6, the change upping horsepower by 13 and torque by 14 lb-ft resulting in a new total of 453 horsepower and 457 lb-ft of torque.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS Coupe
The Cayenne GTS Coupe can be upgraded with a special high-frequency sport exhaust denoted by two larger oval tailpipes in the middle of a more aggressive rear diffuser.

Needless to say the new 2021 Cayenne GTS is faster than its three-year-old predecessor, with both body styles sprinting from standstill to 100 km/h in a scant 4.5 seconds when equipped with their Sport Chrono Packages, which is 0.6 seconds quicker than previous examples. The base Cayenne GTS achieves a zero to 100 km/h sprint in 4.8 seconds, by the way, while both are capable of a 270-km/h terminal velocity, this being an 8-km/h improvement of their predecessor.

The 4.0-litre direct-injection V8 utilizes a new intelligently designed thermal management system as well as adaptive cylinder control to achieve its performance targets, while Porsche’s eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic transmission was once again chosen for shifting duties. Additionally, Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive continues to be standard equipment.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS
The regular Cayenne GTS and base model GTS Coupe have their quad of tailpipes poking out either side of the rear valance.

A beefy standard exhaust system shows two large circular tailpipes poking through each side of a sportier rear fascia, for a total of four, the new look appearing menacing to say the least, while in a press release Porsche claimed they produce “a rich, sporty sound with a unique character.” Those opting for the Cayenne GTS Coupe can alternatively choose a special high frequency-tuned sports exhaust system when also upgrading to the Lightweight Sports Package, the tailpipes on this version of the SUV denoted by even larger oval tips emanating from the centre of the rear bumper.

The renewed Cayenne GTS also gets some suspension upgrades such as a set of redesigned Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) dampers that, when combined with the standard three-chamber Air Suspension, lower the utility’s ride height by 30 mm compared to the current Cayenne S, while Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus) is standard equipment too.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS Coupe
A carbon-fibre roof is available on the Cayenne GTS Coupe.

The base Cayenne GTS and Cayenne GTS Coupe models ride on a special set of black-silk gloss 21-inch RS Spyder Design alloy wheels, although take note that many wheel and tire packages are available. Likewise, grey cast iron 390 by 38 mm front and 358 by 28 mm rear brake rotors come standard, as are a set of red-painted calipers, but the new GTS can be had with the tungsten carbide-coated Porsche Surface Coated Brake (PSCB) system, or better yet the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system. Two additional options include rear-axle steering, and Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) active roll stabilization.

The two new GTS model wouldn’t be complete without a bevy of styling enhancements from the exterior to the interior, so Porsche has added the usual blackened trim bits outside via the standard Sport Design package, which darkens accents on the front air intakes, side window surrounds, exhaust tips, plus the Porsche badges and model designation in back. Likewise, the LED headlamps, which feature the Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS), are tinted black too, as is the new LED taillight bar.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS
The Cayenne GTS is once again enhanced with suede-like Alcantara trim.

As is normally the case with GTS models, Porsche covers the interior door and centre console armrests in rich suede-like Alcantara, not to mention the seat centre panels, the roof liner, and more, while dark-brushed aluminum accents separate the GTS’ cabin from the brighter aluminum used on other Cayenne trims.

The standard eight-way powered front sport seats are improved with larger side bolstering too, as well as “GTS” embroidery on the head restraints, but this isn’t the only place you’ll find the renowned GTS emblem. Check out the primary gauge cluster’s tachometer dial, the door entry sills, and the front outer door panels too. Those wanting more can opt for a GTS interior package that features Carmine Red or Chalk colour accents, including decorative stitching.

The new 2021 Cayenne GTS and 2021 Cayenne GTS Coupe are now available to order from your local Porsche dealer ahead of arriving during Q4 of 2020, while respective pricing starts at $120,400 and $126,500, plus freight and fees.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

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Porsche grows 2020 911 line with new base Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Most will agree, the new 2020 911 Carrera Cabriolet looks fabulous. (Photo: Porsche)

It’s been less than a year since Porsche introduced the all-new eighth-generation 2020 911 at the LA auto show, and just seven months since the Cabriolet arrived, and now the German performance brand is readying those mid-range Carrera S models for production and upcoming deliveries this fall. Ahead of these 443 horsepower super cars, Porsche has just released photos and key information about a couple of 911 models that are a bit more down to earth, the more affordable base 911 Carrera Coupe and 911 Carrera Cabriolet. 

The new entry-level 911 hardtop and soft-top models share the same 3.0-litre twin-turbo six-cylinder “boxer” engine as those “S” trims, but they incorporate a unique set of turbos for less performance. Still, 379 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque is no laughing matter, unless the thrill of quick acceleration makes you giggle. The first number adds 9 horsepower over the outgoing 2019 model, which results in a zero to 100km/h sprint time of just 4.2 seconds, or 4.0 seconds with the optional Sport Chrono Package. This is a significant move up from the outgoing base Carrera that was only capable of 4.6 or 4.2 seconds to 100km/h respectively. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
A base model? Yes, it’s hard to believe this gorgeous new 2020 Carrera Coupe is the most affordable 911. (Photo: Porsche)

Surprisingly, the new 911 Carrera will only be available with Porsche’s new eight-speed dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission when it first arrives. This gearbox, which was originally announced for the Carrera S, adds one gear over the outgoing automatic, for stronger performance and improved fuel economy. Those who want the seven-speed manual will need to wait until later in the model. 

The new Carrera Coupe’s track speed is identical to the outgoing model at 293 km/h (182 mph), while the Cabriolet’s terminal velocity is 291 km/h (181 mph). It’s normal for a fabric-topped convertible to be slower at high speeds than its equivalent hardtop coupe, due to the cloth roof “ballooning” at high speeds, but Porsche incorporated magnesium surface elements dubbed “bows” within the redesigned roof’s structure, so it manages wind more effectively. 

By the way, that fabric roof, which is now bigger to accommodate for the 911’s larger interior, can open and close at speeds of up to 50 km/h (30 mph), and only needs 12 seconds to do so thanks to a reworked hydraulic system. What’s more, the updated process also extends an electrically extendable wind deflector so as to keep gusts of air from discomforting occupants. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Porsche promises a larger, more accommodating interior with greater refinement and more advanced technologies. (Photo: Porsche)

Inside that larger, more accommodating cabin, the new 911 Carrera receives a wholly renewed interior with a large 10.9-inch high-definition touchscreen on the centre stack, while an all-new safety feature dubbed “Wet Mode” provides greater control when it’s raining or otherwise slippery. 

All just-mentioned items come standard with the Carrera S, but take note the new base Carrera gets a smaller set of 19-inch alloys on 235/40 ZR performance tires up front, plus bigger 20-inch rims shod in 295/35 ZR rubber at the rear. Additionally, the base Carrera’s 330-millimetre brake rotors are smaller than the Carrera S’ discs, these biting onto black-coated four-piston monobloc fixed calipers for stopping power that should easily be up to task for dealing with this less potent car’s overall performance. Also notable, the 911 Carrera’s exhaust system gets unique individual tailpipe covers. 

Transport Canada hasn’t provided fuel economy specs for the new 2020 911 models yet, but Porsche claims its new base Coupe and Cabriolet will be capable of a 9.0 and 9.2 L/100km city/highway combined rating respectively, when calculated on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). We can expect slightly different numbers when our five-cycle rating system is applied. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Porsche’s new eight-speed automatic will be standard until its seven-speed manual arrives later in the model year. (Photo: Porsche)

And what about pricing? Surprisingly the base 2020 911 Carrera Coupe’s window sticker gets pushed up $7,000 over its predecessor, from $104,000 to $111,000, while the Cabriolet’s starting price has been increased from $118,100 to $125,600, for a $7,500 increase. Then again, we need to factor in that the new eight-speed automated PDK transmission is now standard, and that prices will likely be lowered when the seven-speed manual arrives later in the model year. 

Just the same, Porsche is probably hoping that the new 2020 911 Carrera’s many enhancements will justify its sharp move up in price, but this said it will be interesting to witness how a more value-driven rival, like Chevy’s new 526-horsepower mid-engine C8 Corvette that hits the road for a mere $69,998, might erode 911 sales. Granted, Porsche clientele, particularly 911 buyers, are not normally Corvette buyers, but the C8 is no normal Corvette, and its more exotic mid-engine layout and styling, stronger performance, and bargain basement price might lure in those who aren’t as brand loyal. 

This said, if you still want a 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe or Cabriolet you can order it now and expect delivery early next year, while all-wheel drive C4 models will be available to order soon. 

And while waiting, be sure to flick through all the photos we’ve gathered in our gallery above, plus enjoy the short video below: 

The new 911 Carrera Coupé and 911 Carrera Cabriolet. (1:00):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

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Gorgeous 2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato debuts online

2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato
The beautiful new DBS GT Zagato promises brilliant performance and a level of exclusivity few Canadians can enjoy. (Photo: Aston Martin)

If you’re hoping to take delivery of a new 2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato, you’ve already made your deposit and accepted that you won’t just be purchasing one car, but actually buying two. 

The new model made its online debut this week, sporting three stunning vantage points thanks to a very talented artist, and despite only seeing graphic renderings with no physical preproduction example available, 19 well-to-do investors anted up sizeable deposits for a set of cars that will set them back a total of $9.8 million CAD (£6 million GBP). 

To clarify, the breathtakingly beautiful 1960s-style DB4 GT Zagato drawn into the background of each photo comes as part of the near $10 million package, the two cars making up Aston Martin’s “DBZ Centenary Collection.” The more contemporary model is actually based on the already impressive DBS Superleggera, a car that shoehorns a big twin-turbo 5.2-litre V12 engine under its long, elegant, shapely hood, this motor good for a supercar-like 715 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque. 

So far we haven’t been told anything about engine specifications regarding the new DBS GT Zagato, but we should expect at least as much performance as offered in the DBS Superleggera, and also consider that more might be coming thanks to the original ‘60s-era DB4 GT Zagato providing a great deal more at the rear wheels than the standard DB4. Still, no matter the powertrain behind the upcoming Aston’s massive new grille, all of its additional attributes are worthy of your attention. 

2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato
The car you can barely see in the background comes as part of the package for just under $10 million CAD. (Photo: Aston Martin)

For starters, it’s clear Aston wanted the new DBS GT Zagato to show a direct lineage to the outgoing Vanquish Zagato that arrived four years ago. They even painting both launch models in the same eye-arresting metallic red, while adorning key exterior accents in metallic gold, even painting the 20-inch twin-five-spoke alloy rims in the same rich hue. 

Additional styling elements adopted from old to new include the big front grille noted a moment ago, plus the double-bump floating-type black roof, a bulging set of rear fenders, and “rocket booster” style tail lamps, yet while the DBS GT Zagato nods to its predecessor with respect, there’s no denying it’s an entirely new model that shares little with the past. Specifically, the DBS Superleggera that underpins the new car has hard points that can’t be unseen, particularly its longer and lower shape that wows with plenty more folds and creases than the car from four years ago. 

Also interesting from a design and functional perspective, is the gold-painted active front grille that incorporates an insert comprised of 108 separate carbon fibre components. When turned off the DBS GT Zagato looks as if its grille is little more than a patterned panel without an opening, but then when the engine is fired up the many tiny segments open up for engine ventilation, this process making the grille appear as if it “flutters” in the wind, said Aston. 

2020 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato
This DB4 GT Zagato comes as part of the two-car package. (Photo: Aston Martin)

Yet more interesting details include angularly sculpted side vents highlighted with more gold trim, while the rocker panels just below don’t extend outward with Aston’s usual carbon fibre side sills, but instead get neatly rolled under the car like classic models did half a century ago. 

Unlike the ovoid headlamps found on the Vanquish Zagato, the new clusters are more in line with today’s Aston Martin design language, while the artfully constructed taillights sit on the outer edges of a large horizontal carbon fibre panel at back, which visually hovers over an even bigger working carbon fibre diffuser under the rear bumper. 

Carbon fibre gets used for the roof panel too, but the DBS GT Zagato doesn’t merely top itself off with any old hardtop. It gets a single section of CFRP that stretches from the top of the windshield to the forward edge of the rear deck lid, while the roof’s aforementioned twin-bubble design made even more unorthodox by not including a rear window or even a set of louvres for rearward visibility. Instead, Aston added a backup camera within a digital rearview mirror, which potentially has the ability to cover much more area than a conventional mirror would allow for. 

2020 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato
This two-car approach is strictly designed for collectors. (Photo: Aston Martin)

When your new DBS GT Zagato arrives at your local Aston Martin dealership next year, either bring along a friend or hire a flatbed driver to pick up your DB4 GT Zagato as well. This gorgeous classic was first shown in France at the 24 Hours of Le Mans last month, and is the newest in a growing line of continuation cars that was initiated with 25 examples of the DB4 GT Continuation in 2017, which retailed for $2.4 million CAD (£1.5 million), followed by another 25 Goldfinger DB5 Continuation models, which, as you may have just guessed, are exact replicas of the star-car that instantly became famous in the 1964 007 classic Goldfinger. It features all the innovative weapons and active armour the original offered James Bond (less any explosive charges or an actual ejecting passenger seat), so its no wonder this model sold out quickly.  

The Goldfinger DB5 Continuation will be delivered in 2020, by the way, just like the two new DBS GT Zagato and DB4 GT Zagato models described in this news story, but for only $4.5 million CAD (£2.75 million) each. 

While all of these prices are without doubt unreachable for the majority of Canadians, those who can afford this lofty point of entry aren’t merely throwing their money away. In fact, some might even see these cars as investments, especially when considering prices paid for earlier examples. For instance, a 1962 DB4 GT Zagato was purchased for $15.4 million CAD (£9.45 million) a few years ago, and that wasn’t even the highest price paid. 

2020 Aston Martin DBS GT Zagato
How would you like to have these two Aston Martin Zagatos in your garage? (Photo: Aston Martin)

Thanks to some unused chassis allocation numbers, Aston Martin produced four more DB4 GT Zagatos in 1988, these given “Sanction II” designations, and then a dozen years later in 2000 the British carmaker built an additional pair of these “Sanction II” specified cars with a unique “Sanction III” designation, and these two models fetched $18.6 million CAD ($14,300,000 USD) in 2015 and $16.5 million CAD (£10,081,500) in 2018 apiece, which made them two of the highest priced cars to ever roll across an auction block. 

It would be irresponsible for any of the 19 new DB4 GT Zagato owners to speculate on the future value of their cars, of course, yet the just noted past success of these highly sought after classics might make them better bets than many other rolling collectibles, and who knows? If one day they can sell their DB4 GT Zagatos for $10 million or more, they may end up paying nothing at all for the fabulous new 2020 DBS GT Zagato. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Aston Martin