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Chevy adds a new EUV crossover model to 2022 Bolt line

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV
Chevy new Bolt EUV adds more SUV-like presence along with extra rear legroom when compared to the regular redesigned Bolt EV.

Chevy has updated its Bolt EV plug-in electric car for 2022, and along with subtly reworked styling, a revised interior and more tech, the bowtie brand will add a second crossover-style variant dubbed EUV, to make the model appeal to more would-be buyers.

The Bolt EV is positioned within the subcompact hatchback segment, with a focus on practical four- to five-passenger capability and flexible cargo hauling utility, plus highly efficient, zero-emissions, battery-powered mobility. Despite all of this clean, green and easy-to-live-with pragmatism, today’s Bolt is actually a great deal more fun to drive than most would imagine before stepping inside, thanks to more than ample torque from its potent electric motor.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV
The revised 2022 Bolt EV loses its roof rails, but gains more distinctive styling up front.

In an interesting move, the outgoing Bolt will lose its roof rails as the new EUV takes over the SUV-style family role, or at least the version shown in GM’s press photos shows a clean roof without any rooftop load carrying capability. The original Bolt not only included a set of roof rails, but also featured a slightly taller ride height and black body cladding around its lower extremities, all in crossover-like fashion. The new 2022 Bolt will carry forward with the latter conventions, while the EUV’s roof rails are more prominent and (at least in the trim level shown in photos) black, adding to its SUV-like presence.

What’s more, the new Bolt EUV adds length, width and height over the regular model, now measuring 161 mm (6.3 in) more from nose to tail, 5 mm (0.2 in) extra from side-to-side, with 10 mm (0.4 in) of additional track, plus 5 mm (0.2 in) add from the base of its tires to the top of its just-noted roof rack. Most importantly, its extended length results in 75 mm (3 in) of extra wheelbase, allowing the EUV to increase rear legroom by 78 mm (3.1 in), but strangely the larger model’s cargo volume decreases slightly, from 470 litres (15.6 cu ft) behind the rear seats and 1,614 litres (57.0 cu ft) when folded down, to a respective 462 and 1,611 litres (16.3 and 56.9 cu ft).

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV
The Bolt EUV’s rear styling is attractive and quite rugged looking.

Odd yet again, despite the EUV increased height, its headroom drops by 0.2 mm (0.1 in) front to rear, plus it forgoes another 24 mm (0.9 in) in front when the optional glass sunroof is chosen. Second-row shoulder room is reduced slightly as well, but hip room grows by a similarly hair-like measurement yet shrinks a bit more in back, thus the upgrade to a larger EUV seems to only benefit rear passenger legroom, which was an issue that has reportedly caused complaints from first-generation Bolt owners. On the positive, the EUV’s curb weight only increases by 41 kg (90 lbs).

The extra poundage probably won’t be felt by EUV buyers, however, being that both Bolts will continue to zip along faster than anything else in their subcompact categories. This in mind, plus factoring in the regular Bolt’s exemplary 417 km (259 miles) range, caused no reason for Chevrolet to improve the power unit, although the same battery/motor setup in the EUV reduces range by about 15 km (9 miles) to 402 km (250 miles).

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV
The regular Bolt EV retains most of its crossover-like styling details, but appears more refined than its predecessor.

The powertrain in question is GM’s permanent magnetic electric drive motor and 65-kWh, 288-cell lithium-ion battery, which combine for a stealthy yet healthy 200 horsepower and 266 pound-feet of torque. Both Bolt models are front-wheel drive, similar to a number of other small crossover SUVs, so don’t take them onto a beach for photos like GM did for the press images.

Chevy makes DC fast charging capability standard, which allows for approximately 160 or 150 km (100 or 95 miles) of EV or EUV range respectively after 30 minutes of charging, while a special dual-level charge cord makes it possible for owners to hook up to a 240-volt charging station or 120-volt household-style three-prong outlet.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV
The new Bolt’s interior features a more conventional layout, this photo showing the new EUV model.

Those familiar with today’s Bolt will notice that Chevy left the biggest changes to their interiors, where both EV and EUV models feature more horizontally themed layouts for a wider visual effect. The new design is more conventionally laid out as well, replacing the pod-type centre stack with one that flows downward in a more traditional style, ending in a conventional lower console. The same standard 10.2-inch touchscreen remains, large for the subcompact category, while the infotainment graphics have been given a refresh. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone connectivity are still standard, with a navigation system optional, but most will probably be happiest to see a new standard wireless charging pad. Chevy saw no need to change the Bolt’s fully digital primary gauge cluster, however, which looks exactly the same as that in today’s model.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV
Both Bolt EV and EUV (shown) models get a new steering wheel design and new centre stack layouts with updated infotainment graphics, but the digital gauge cluster remains unchanged.

Together with the current Bolt’s less than ideal rear legroom, owners also complained about seat comfort and interior materials quality, which they deemed substandard for the many asked. While loading the Bolt up with an impressive list of kit, including that big infotainment display just noted, the car’s near $45k price point justifies higher quality surface treatments. Thus, the new 2022 Bolt models will get their just desserts, with softer surfaces in key areas, even including what appear to be padded leatherette on the dash. Chevy seems to have improved some cabin switchgear too, but we shouldn’t expect anything nearing Cadillac quality.

Knobs, levers and switches in mind, the new lower centre console includes an updated gear selector that replaces the current model’s conventional shifter for a slim row of Acura/Honda-style push and pull buttons. The green-lit button nearest to the driver engages one-pedal driving, which is a more effective design than slotting the shift lever into the “L” position, a system employed for the current Bolt and other EV and plug-in models within GM’s various lineups. The paddles on the backside of the new flat-bottom steering wheel will be more familiar to Bolt (and Volt) owners. These can be used for braking assistance, plus for recharging the battery through regenerative kinetic energy.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV
Switching gears is now done via a push/pull button interface on the lower console.

Tech in mind, the top-line EUV Premier will be first amongst Chevrolet vehicles to offer GM’s Super Cruise hands-free semi-self-driving technology, which is functional on median divided highways. The EUV Premier also features adaptive cruise control and an HD parking camera with a bird’s eye overhead view.

With respect to new Bolt family styling, the majority of onlookers should find the smaller EV better looking than its already reasonably attractive (for a subcompact hatchback) predecessor, unless a more traditional grille-filled front fascia is preferred. The new model says goodbye to the black mesh grille insert, instead replacing it with a grey-painted and patterned panel cut in an ovoid outline, with a slender slot below being the real air intake. This patterned effect does a better job creating family branding than Tesla’s Model 3, for instance, which looks like a non-branded car in an insurance commercial.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV
Dedicated cargo space in the EV (shown) is actually more plentiful than that in the larger EUV.

Following a theme from the first-gen Bolt and Volt predecessor, Chevy connects the new LED headlamps and side mirror housings with a thick black strip of fender trim, while the outgoing car’s traditional fog lights have been axed for more extended black trim, similar to Cadillac’s front fascia styling.

The EUV features a unique frontal design, which separates the headlight clusters and air intake-style fog lamp bezels, while providing a deeper air vent at the base of a similar solid grey grille insert. Black fender garnishes also flow into the mirror caps, while appearing to follow the black-painted window trim around the glass to a floating roof look, not unlike designs in use across the Chevrolet lineup.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV
Both Bolt EV and EUV (shown) models provide loads of luggage space when the second-row seatbacks are lowered.

The rear designs of both Bolt models are unique in their execution, but they have a similar design theme that features clean, horizontal, LED taillights at the corners, plus loads of gloss-black composite trim in between. Large matte black bumpers underscore the look, although in a change of pace the EUV appears somewhat dressier due to aluminum-like skid plates, both in the rear and up front.

The 2022 Bolt EV will be priced from $38,198 (plus freight and fees), which is a shocking $6,800 lower than today’s 2021 Bolt EV (those roof rails must have been expensive add-ons), while the new Bolt EUV will be available from $40,198. This means that fully loaded versions should keep them below $45,000, which is as high as possible before being disqualified for government rebate programs. Today’s base Bolt LT can be had for $44,998, incidentally, so it qualifies for the most generous of rebates, whereas the better equipped 2021 Bolt Premier’s $50,298 MSRP doesn’t.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV
The new 2022 Bolt EV (shown) and EUV should help Chevy grow its electric car marketshare.

Our 2021 Chevrolet Bolt EV Canada Prices page is current showing up to $1,500 in additional incentives available, with average member savings of $2,875, while our 2020 Chevrolet Bolt EV Canada Prices page shows up to $2,000 in incentives. GM is also offering factory leasing and financing rates from zero-percent for 2022 models. To get the best deal possible, become a member of CarCostCanada, which will provide the types of information above as well as dealer invoice pricing that can help you save thousands from your next new vehicle purchase. Also, remember to download the free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store.

 

Magic is Electric | Bolt EUV Reveal | Chevrolet (1:30):

Behind the Magic | Bolt EUV Reveal | Chevrolet (14:25):

Super Cruise | Bolt EUV | Chevrolet (0:30):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Chevrolet

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2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio Road Test

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
In this tranquil setting, Alfa Romeo’s Stelvio Quadrifoglio doesn’t appear so outrageously quick.

If you’re considering a performance SUV, I have four words of advice: Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio. Despite being compact in size, or maybe because of it, the feisty Italian is one of the fastest production utilities ever created.

How fast is it? It’s evenly matched against Mercedes-AMG’s similarly sized GLC 63 S off the line, both holding title to quickest in their compact luxury SUV class, while it edges out the segment’s second-fastest BMW X3 M Competition by 3 km/h at 283 km/h (176 mph) compared to 280 (174). Possibly more important from an all-round performance perspective, the Stelvio Quadrifoglio has earned more fastest lap records than any SUV available new today.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Only one SUV can outgun the Stelvio Quadrifoglio, another Italian that goes by the name of Urus.

It doesn’t hurt that it shares racing pedigree limelight with the aforementioned three-pointed star brand, even if Alfa Romeo Racing ORLEN is no Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula One Team. Afla’s just older, wiser and cooler than Merc, the Italian brand having been formed in 1915 compared to Mercedes’ 1922 (a technicality, but it’s F1 and I’m running with it). Likewise, I’d rather hang out with Alfa’s older, wiser and cooler driver and F1 champion Kimi Räikkönen than seven-times world champ Lewis Hamilton too. Kimi’s chill and hilarious, while Lewis is always so serious, and so political… but I digress.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Do you need to ask? Of course the hood louvres are functional.

Or did I? After all, when we buy a premium branded car, especially a performance model with awesome street cred, most of us buy into the company that builds it as much as the vehicle itself. Whether we want to admit it or not, branding sells, and while Alfa Romeo doesn’t reach as many luxury buyers are Mercedes-Benz, I’m willing to wager a bet the majority of those who buy into Alfa do so with more enthusiasm. Maybe it’s an Italian thing. Alfa is all about red-blooded passion.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Sticky Pirelli performance rubber helps keep the 2021 Quadrifoglio on the straight and narrow, or at least between the lines on a curving backroad.

That Alfa Romeo is infused with more racing pedigree than most of its competitors doesn’t hurt matters either, the brand even fielding a Formula One team, which can’t be said for all of its key competitors except Mercedes-AMG—Aston Martin’s larger and much pricier DBX isn’t a direct competitor. You don’t buy one of these things because you’re being practical. Sure, a Stelvio is easier to stow things inside than a Giulia or any other premium sedan, and it seats four large adults in comfort or five in a pinch, but you can do that in a RAV4, and go pretty quick to boot, if it’s the new plug-in hybrid.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
A quad of tailpipes seems fitting given this Alfa’s name.

Pretty quick is one thing, but the Stelvio Quadrifoglio’s top track speed is only beaten by Aston Martin’s new DBX amongst SUVs, the little Alfa managing 283 km/h (176 mph), as noted earlier, with the Aston whisking past at a heady 291 km/h (181 mph). The Quad is actually quicker from standstill to 100 km/h, leaving the exotic super-SUV behind as if it’s standing still, the two brands’ official 0-100 km/h times claimed to be 3.8 seconds to 4.5. That’s not even in the same ballpark, let alone on the same track (although the DBX looked fabulous pulling up behind the Merc, Red Bull, McLaren, Ferrari, AlphaTauri, Alfa, Alpine, Williams, Haas, and yes, Aston F1 cars as the official medical car at the Bahrain GP last weekend).

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The Stelvio Quadrifoglio’s cabin is downright exotic.

Aston will likely follow up the current DBX with a stronger performing version at some point, just like Porsche does with its various Cayenne trims. The German brand’s Turbo S E-Hybrid is monstrous, while Bentley’s massive Bentayga Speed completely defies physics, but at least for now we can’t deny the hard numbers. The Stelvio Quadrifoglio is even quicker from zero to 100 km/h than those just-noted uber utes. It’s not the quickest of all, mind you, this honour going to Lamborghini’s phenomenal Urus, which is capable of jettisoning from standstill to 100 km/h in a ferocious 3.4 seconds, while independent testers have claimed even quicker times.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The amount of leather, pseude, carbon fibre, aluminum, and other top-tier materials makes the little Alfa SUV feel like it’s worth tens of thousands more.

Of course, I haven’t even mentioned a host of super-fast SUVs, like the Dodge Durango SRT that’s good for a 4.6-second zero to 100km/h time and 250 km/h (155mph) of top speed, or the Mercedes-AMG GLA 45 that can sprint to 100 km/h in 4.5 seconds and also gets limited to 250 km/h (155 mph). Rolls-Royce’s Cullinan Black Badge also hits 100 km/h in a scant 4.5 seconds and tops out at 250 (155), while the Porsche Macan Turbo (4.5 and 269/167), Range Rover Velar SV Autobiography Dynamic Edition (4.5 and 273/170), and Range Rover Sport SVR (4.5s and 291/181 respectively) have similar performance numbers.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The Stelvio Quadrifoglio’s cockpit is comfortable, luxurious, and most importantly fully capable of holding driver in place during hard charging.

Jaguar’s F-Pace SVR is a bit quicker off the line (4.3 and 250/155), while Mercedes-AMG’s GLE 63 S is faster still (3.9 and 280/174), as is BMW’s X5 M Competition (3.9 and 285/177), Maserati’s Levante Trofeo (3.9 and 301/187), the Audi’s RS Q8 (3.9 and 306/190). Ford’s Mustang Mach-E GT SUV is even quicker (3.7 and 209/130), as is the Durango SRT Hellcat (3.7 and 289/180), Jeep’s Grand Cherokee Trackhawk (3.7 and 289/180), while Tesla’s Model X P100D (2.8 and 262/163) leaves everything in electric dust. BMW’s X3 M Competition zips to 100 km/h in 4.2 seconds, incidentally, while the Bentayga Speed and Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid require 4.0 seconds and 3.8 seconds respectively.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Disappointed the Quadrifoglio’s gauges aren’t fully digital? We weren’t.

I’ve driven some of the above and each were crazy fun, but all said there’s something extraordinarily special about the Stelvio Quadrifoglio. It feels lighter and nimbler than most, and the music made from its snarling sextet of pistons and rambunctious quartet of tailpipes is like nothing else this side of the fabulous Giulia Quadrifoglio. Combined with accompanying G forces bashing my backside into a perfectly formed leather- and Alcantara-covered driver’s seat, not to mention similar forces trying to expel me beyond that seat’s sizeable side bolsters when pushing the envelope through twisting backroads, this SUV is shockingly good.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The red engine start/stop button on the steering wheel is fabulous!

Trust me, I did my best to drive slowly. I truly did. In fact, I more or less succeeded in maintaining posted limits around the city and along rural highways, especially where joy-sucking regulation enforcers have been known to drink coffee and eat donuts while poking radar guns out windows of less inspirational Ford Explorers, but I failed miserably when beyond my city’s outer perimeter, where ideal strips of perfectly aligned pavement stretched diagonally across farmland to connect minuscule communities with circuitous secondary backroads and even quicker-paced byways. This is where Alfa’s Quadrifoglios were designed to run freely, and where I quickly learned how otherworldly this little utility is to drive.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Alfa has made big improvements with its infotainment system.

Spin its DNA drive selector to the “d” position for sportier Dynamic mode, or turn it one position farther for “RACE”, which results in even more intense performance, and prepare for ridiculous levels of speed, not to mention one of the most enticingly exhaustive snap, crackle and pop cacophonies to ever emanate from the rear of a vehicle.

Alfa Romeo wraps a beautiful set of 20-inch alloys in 255/45R20 front and 285/40R20 rear Pirelli P Zero performance rubber, which can cling to most any kind of road surface. The specially-chosen tires combine ideally with a smartly sorted chassis that feels as if it could run rings around any competitor.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
This is where you’ll find “RACE” mode.

My driving position was excellent. Alfa slightly squared-off the Quad’s leather-wrapped sport steering wheel, which was just large enough to feel substantive without being cumbersome. It features nicely formed thumb spats for a good grip, these just ahead of long alloy paddle shifters that are attached to the steering column instead of the wheel. This means they’re always where they’re supposed to be, even when the wheel’s rotated in a given direction multiple times. The steering column’s tilt and reach adjustability is generous as well, with the latter matching excellent seat adjustment. My long-legged, short-torso frame fit in well, not always the case with some rivals, which resulted in good control and much-appreciated comfort.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Few production vehicles have better seats.

No wonder Alfa Romeo’s team of professional drivers have had no issue setting global track lap records. The Stelvio Quadrifoglio leads every SUV made at Britain’s famed Silverstone (2:31.6) racetrack, not to mention Donington Park (1:21.1), and the Indy Circuit at Brands Hatch (55.9), but to be fair I must admit its record-setting 7:51.7-minute lap around the Nürburgring Nordschleife was recently broken by the aforementioned GLC 63 S, the hyper-Merc laying down a wickedly quick lap time of 7.49.369 minutes.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
A panoramic sunroof is always appreciated.

Both are faster in one lap of the 20.832-km mountainside racetrack than the next-best Porsche Cayenne Turbo S, however, which did the deed in 7:59.7 minutes, while the Range Rover Sport SVR could only manage the course in 8:14 minutes. Until one of the previously mentioned super-SUVs chooses to take these two little compacts on at the ‘Ring, they’ll likely remain top of the “Green Hell” podium.

Back to my need for fairness, the Urus nabbed the title from this Stelvio Q at one of my favourite racecourses, California’s Laguna Seca. It makes sense for the 641-horsepower super-ute to beat the little Alfa, especially when factoring in the latter SUV’s comparatively bargain-basement price, but its 1:40.9-minute record lap wasn’t all that much better than the Stelvio’s 1:43.5-minute trip around the ultra-challenging track.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The second-row is amply large for this class, while it’s finished just as nicely as the passenger compartment up front.

You can get into a 2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio for just $98,995, by the way, which is merely a fraction of the Urus’ $285,000 price tag. The top-tier Merc-AMG GLC starts at $94,900, by the way, while a W12-enhanced Bentayga is even pricier than the Lambo. The super-quick Audi is a happy medium at $126,500, but that’s still a lot of extra moola for its slower straight-line speed and only slightly higher terminal velocity. There’s a lot more to any of these SUVs than only performance, mind you, but despite not being a Lamborghini or Bentley, the top-line Stelvio won’t exactly leave you feeling like you’re down and out.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The Stelvio’s 40/20/40-split rear seatbacks make for optimal cargo/passenger flexibility, while the track system is great for tying down cargo.

It doesn’t matter which premium branded super SUV you opt for, its interior will come stuffed full of contrast-stitched leather with ultra-suede accents, brushed and polished metals, plus glossy carbon-fibre trim, and more, while high-grade pliable composite surfaces are used where one of the above coverings won’t work. The Stelvio Quadrifoglio is no exception. That said, at just under $100k it’s not going to blow away a Bentayga owner, but its interior design is nevertheless alluring, quality of workmanship excellent, and overall sense of luxury impressive.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Release levers on the cargo area sidewalls will drop the second-row seatbacks.

I was happy to learn of its updated infotainment system too, the interface more user-friendly and graphically inspiring than a four-cylinder Stelvio I drove before. Its drag and drop tile/widget design made it more customizable too, while it can do most anything its competitors can, plus compile performance statistics via various “pages” showing boost, torque, lateral Gs, etcetera.

I was surprised, but not disappointed that a fully-digital gauge cluster wasn’t included, being that the analogue dials and sporty circular shrouds looked fabulous and worked well. A large speedo and tach bookended a big high-definition multi-information display in the middle, this screen complete with the usual functions.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
The Stelvio Quadrifoglio’s V6 is a real thing of beauty.

Along with the impeccably finished cabin and outrageous performance, the Stelvio Quadrifoglio is plenty practical too. It’s an SUV after all, and therefore came with a comfortable, sizeable second row with three seatbelts across, as well as three-way outboard seat heaters, two USB-A charge ports on the backside of the front console, great rear ventilation, and overall refinement as nicely finished as the front seating area.

The cargo compartment was similarly impressive, and roomy enough for the majority of peoples’ requirements. An especially useful 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatback expanded on its cargo carrying capacity further, while Alfa also included an smartly engineered aluminum track system for strapping down items that might otherwise fly about (for those moments when you temporarily forget you’re supposed to be carting cargo and start driving like Mario).

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
A closer look shows the green four-leaf clover that has adorned top models for decades.

Alfa Romeo is currently offering factory leasing and financing rates from zero-percent, by the way, so be sure to check out our 2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Canada Prices page where you can also configure your Stelvio with every available colour and option. A CarCostCanada membership will also provide information about available manufacturer rebates when available, plus dealer invoice pricing that can make sure you pay the lowest price possible during negotiations. Learn how the CarCostCanada system saves you money, and remember to download our free app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store so you can have all of this critical info immediately available.

2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio
Alfa Romeo’s Stelvio Quadrifoglio is a great way to wake up every morning.

To reiterate, the Stelvio Quadrifoglio is up against some very worthy premium competitors, but the fact that you’ll need to spend more than $250k in order to get something capable of outrunning it says everything you need to know. Mercedes’ fastest GLC is a more direct match and should be up for consideration, but its twin-turbo V8 doesn’t provide the same kind of high-strung audio track as Alfa’s 2.9-litre twin-turbo V6, making the Italian more like watching (and listening to) classic F1, and the Merc more akin to today’s fast yet dull sounding hybrid machinery.

We also need to consider standard features and options. The Stelvio Quadrifoglio comes mostly loaded up with features, other than approximately $4k worth of add-ons, whereas the AMG GLC 63 S can be had for slightly less in base form, but the German model needs to be optioned up with more than $26k of extras to come in line with the Italian SUV. This probably makes the Stelvio Quadrifoglio the wiser choice financially, even though you probably won’t care what it costs once behind the wheel.

Review and photos by Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

Tougher looking 2021 Nissan Kicks also improves infotainment systems

2021 Nissan Kicks
The 2021 Nissan Kicks gets a bold new grille and plenty of other updates, while pricing has only increased by $500.

Lovers of small hatchbacks like Nissan’s Micra and Versa Note will have noticed a disturbing trend in recent years, their cancellations.

The same has happened with most manufacturers, with Toyota having dropped its Yaris, Honda having nixed its Fit, Ford having axed its Fiesta (and Focus), and the list going on. All of the above have increased their allotment of small crossover SUVs, however, which on the surface seems as if we’re not all that concerned about fuel economy after all.

2021 Nissan Kicks
Side profile and rear styling hasn’t changed much, but it still looks attractive.

Fortunately, most of these new crossover SUVs are merely front-wheel drive economy cars on steroids. The various brands have slightly raised their suspensions and rooflines, sometimes making them more accommodating inside, but all come standard with front-wheel drivetrains and equally efficient powerplants, some not even offering all-wheel drive at all.

Yes, the concept of purchasing a new car for under $10k is now history, the Micra having sold for a measly $9,988 back in 2018 (albeit $10,488 in 2019, its last year of availability here), with even the previously cheaper Mitsubishi Mirage now selling for $13,858. While new car buyers can still purchase Chevy’s Spark for only $10,398, this now the lowest priced new vehicle in Canada, the least expensive Nissan, the Versa sedan, has crept up to $16,498, which while pricey compared to the old Versa Note or Micra, is still a great deal more affordable than Toyota’s least expensive car, its Corolla now starting at $19,350, or Honda’s Civic, now the Japanese brand’s entry-level offering at $23,400. That’s pricier than the $23,490 Mini Cooper 3-Door, which is considered (by some) to be premium.

2021 Nissan Kicks
Side mirror turn signals have been added for SV and SL trims.

This makes Nissan’s entry-level hatchback seem very affordable. The Kicks SUV is that vehicle, and with a starting price of $19,898 (plus freight and fees), up $500 from last year, it’s one of three Nissan models priced under $20k (the impressive new Sentra can be had for a bit less at $19,198).

For that extra $500, Nissan has grafted a big, imposing grille on the front of its smallest crossover, and for the most part we feel it looks quite good. Its chromed surround flows elegantly upwards and outward toward sharply chiselled headlamps, while a fresh set of LED fog lights are located just beneath, at least when viewing the Kicks’ sportiest top-line SR trim. Updates aren’t as noticeable at each side or hind end, the former featuring a new set of LED turn signals within revised side mirror housings, and the latter adding a reworked bumper cap.

2021 Nissan Kicks
The cabin mostly stays the same, except for some updated electronics.

The slight price increase also includes new standard features such as auto on/off headlamps, heated exterior mirrors, and a rear wiper/washer, while changes to the cabin include a new standard 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen with integrated Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. When moving up to mid-range SV and top-line SR trims, the display gets upsized to 8.0 inches in diameter, with additional features including a leather-clad steering wheel and shift knob, a single-zone auto HVAC system, and a Bose audio upgrade.

The Kicks’ 1.6-litre four-cylinder engine makes a reasonably peppy 122 horsepower and 114 lb-ft of torque, which means it wasn’t changed as part of the refresh. Likewise, its continuously variable transmission (CVT) remains standard too, resulting in the identical a fuel economy rating to last year: 7.7 L/100km city, 6.6 highway and 7.2 combined with its sole front-wheel drivetrain.

2021 Nissan Kicks
The improved infotainment touchscreen now gets standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration.

The 2021 Kicks also comes well equipped with advanced standard safety and convenience features such as automatic emergency braking, rear auto braking, lane-departure warning, blind-spot warning, rear cross-traffic alert, and auto high-beam assistance. The move up to SV or SR trims includes driver alert monitoring plus a rear door alert system that warns the driver when something (or someone) may still be in the rear seating area after parking, while top-tier SR Premium trim adds an overhead camera system.

Nissan is currently offering the 2021 Kicks with up to $750 in additional incentives, while CarCostCanada members are saving an average of $1,000 when purchasing a new Kicks, thanks to information about manufacturer rebates (when available), factory leasing and financing deals (when offered), and dealer invoice pricing. Be sure to download our free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store, so you can have all this critical money saving info available when you need it most.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Nissan

CarCostCanada

New Mercedes EQA brings electric power to entry-level luxury SUV segment

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
Mercedes is preparing its new EQA electric for sale, and we think it’ll eventually arrive here in Canada where small SUVs do very well.

Mercedes is expanding its electric vehicle lineup rapidly, due to the goal of providing a “Carbon Neutral” model lineup by 2039, with the latest plug-in offering possibly its most important being that it’s the gateway into three-pointed star EVs.

When (or if) the EQA is sold into the Canadian market (we shouldn’t expect it before calendar year 2022), it will most likely be Mercedes’ most affordable EV. Designed to slot below the EQC, which was originally scheduled to launch later this year but will likely arrive next year, the EQA will initially combine for a three-way EV lineup topped off by the full-size EQS luxury sedan and SUV variant (although the EQE sedan and SUV are expected to join below the EQS models, these targeting Tesla’s Model X and Audi’s E-Tron and E-Tron Sportback).

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
The long, wide strip of LED taillights does a good job of separating the EQA from its GLA-Class platform donor.

Mercedes is obviously targeting the Tesla Model S, Porsche Taycan, and Audi E-Tron GT Quattro with the latter (or maybe more so with the upcoming EQE sedan), as well as the Tesla Model Y and Jaguar i-Pace with the EQC, whereas only the Volvo XC40 Recharge competes directly with the EQA (and to some extent the BMW i3), allowing a fairly open market in the electrically-powered subcompact luxury SUV market segment. This could change in the next year or so, however.

According to Mercedes-Benz Canada President and CEO, Brian Fulton who was addressing journalists attending the Montreal International Auto Show in January of 2019, the EQS, EQC and this EQA model will initiate a 10-model EQ lineup of new EVs, with one of the others including an EQB (based on the GLB subcompact SUV).

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
The EQA is 100-percent electric, so you’ll need to plug it in to get power.

While the EQC’s dual electric motors produce 300 kilowatts (402 horsepower) and 564 lb-ft of torque, the smaller EQA’s initial 250 trim line will offer a single electric motor with 140 kW (188 hp), focusing more on efficiency than performance. A more capable performer is expected to make approximately 200 kW (268 hp) through a second electric motor driving an opposing set of wheels, this resulting in all-wheel drive. A thin battery gets spread out below the floor in order to maximize interior space, enhance weight distribution, and lower the model’s centre of gravity to optimize handling.

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
Anyone familiar with current Mercedes interiors will feel right at home in the highly advanced EQA.

Of utmost importance, the EQA’s range is said to be about 500 kilometres on a single charge (depending on the model chosen), based on Europe’s somewhat optimistic NEDC and WLTP standards (we should expect this number to be downsized when the EQA hits North American markets).

Making the most of stored electricity, the EQA will utilize an intelligent navigation system that plots out the most efficient routes possible after calculating real-time traffic information, as well as terrain, weather conditions, driving style, and charging requirements.

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
The EQA uses a modified version of the same MBUX gauge cluster/infotainment display found in the GLA.

Further aiding efficiency, Mercedes has incorporated a standard heat pump to channel the warmth generated from the EQA’s electric powertrain into the passenger compartment. Eco Assist aids battery usage too, while plenty of advanced driver assistive systems and electronic safety technologies have been designed to protect everyone onboard.

While most might think Mercedes used one of its wind tunnels to perfect the EQA’s impressive 0.28 drag coefficient, the reality is that such aerodynamics were achieved digitally, a first for the German carmaker. Therefore, the EQA’s smooth exterior shell with nearly flush headlights and grille, plus its arcing coupe-like roofline, wind-cheating alloys, and almost completely enclosed underbelly were the result of computer simulations.

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
EQA seating looks just as roomy and comfortable as in the gasoline-powered GLA-Class.

Just the same, there’s no denying the EQA’s GLA-Class roots. The new electric shares architectural hard points with Mercedes’ smallest gasoline-powered SUV, just like the brand’s other EQ models utilize the underpinnings of their similarly named counterparts.

Mercedes has added blue accents to the headlight clusters for a bit more personality, while an LED light strip visually connects those lenses with daytime running lamps that span across the grille. The theme gets used similarly for the SUV’s hind quarters too, which show organically-shaped LED taillights visually connecting through a narrow reflector that spans the back hatch.

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
The slim battery rides low under the EQA’s floor, aiding handling.

Inside, the EQA should look familiar to anyone who’s experienced a modern-day Mercedes model. The instrument panel is highlighted by the automaker’s dual-screen MBUX display, featuring a digital primary instrument cluster to the left and an infotainment touchscreen on the right, the latter controllable via a touchpad and buttons on the lower centre console as well. Together with such systems’ normal functions, the two EQA displays will feature a bevy of EV-specific graphic interfaces.

Just like with its gasoline-powered models, Mercedes also integrates ambient lighting to highlight key interior design elements in the EQA. Materials quality should be up to par as well, while an optional rose gold trim package should match similarly coloured smartphones.

2022 Mercedes-Benz EQA
Initially, a less potent EQA 250 model will debut.

Although Mercedes’ EQA is not yet available for purchase, those wanting an efficient subcompact luxury SUV should consider the brand’s GLA-Class, which is currently being offered with up to $1,000 in additional incentives, or if you can still manage to find a new 2020 model (2020 was a rough year for car sales after all) you may be able to save up to $5,000 in additional incentives.

To find out more, visit our 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLA Canada Prices and 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLA Canada Prices pages, plus remember that a CarCostCanada membership can provide yet more savings from factory rebates (when available), manufacturer leasing and financing deals (when available), and always available dealer invoice pricing that can save you thousands when negotiating your deal. Check out how easy the CarCostCanada system is to use and how affordable it is, plus be sure to download the free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Mercedes-Benz

CarCostCanada

Ford and Hyundai shine at 2021 North American Car, Utility and Truck of the Year awards

2021 Ford F-150
The 2021 Ford F-150 took home the coveted North American Truck of the Year award.

In case you missed it, Ford almost swept the 2021 North American Car, Utility and Truck of the Year (NACTOY) awards, with the industry’s best-selling F-150 claiming 2021 Truck of the Year, and the Mustang Mach-E earning 2021’s Utility of the Year.

The 2021 Car of the Year went to Hyundai’s redesigned Elantra, which might cause pause amongst blue-oval product planners questioning whether or not they might’ve enjoyed a three-way win if the much-lauded European-spec Focus was still offered on our shores.

2021 Hyundai Elantra
Hyundai’s redesigned Elantra earned the 2021 North American Car of the Year award.

Hyundai won the car sector’s second-place prize too, or at least its Genesis luxury brand did. That honour went to the redesigned G80 mid-size luxury sedan, whereas Nissan’s wholly redone Sentra took a respectable third in the yearly awards program.

Hyundai’s Genesis brand once again placed well in the Utility category, pulling in right behind the Mustang Mach-E with its new GV80 mid-size luxury crossover SUV, while the rugged looking Land Rover Defender claimed third.

Finally, the “Desert Rated” Jeep Gladiator Mojave took second in the Truck of the Year segment (the entire Gladiator line won this category in 2020), while the off-road “race replica” Ram 1500 TRX earned a solid third place.

2021 Ford Mach-E
Ford’s Mustang-inspired (and named) Mach-E, deservedly won Utility of the Year, despite the controversy surrounding its name.

Interestingly, the Truck of the Year finalists just mentioned were only significantly upgraded trims of models previously available in 2020, making the category-winning F-150 as the only winner to be completely redesigned.

To learn more about these NACTOY-winning vehicles, be sure to click on the associated link. It will send you to the correct CarCostCanada pricing page, where you can find out about any manufacturer incentives, average member savings (when available), special factory leasing and financing rates (when available), manufacturer rebates (when available), and (always available) dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands on your next new vehicle purchase. Find out more about how the CarCostCanada system works, and remember to download our free mobile app at the Google Play Store or Apple Store so you can have access to all of this critical info whenever you need it.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Dodge, Ford, Genesis, Hyundai, Jeep, Nissan

CarCostCanada

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS Road Test

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
Chevy’s Blazer RS certainly pulls eyeballs.

I want a new Blazer. Yah, you heard me right. There’s just one problem. The Blazer I want is a 4×4-capable compact/mid-sizer capable of going toe-to-toe with Ford’s new Bronco and Jeep’s legendary Wrangler, not an all-wheel drive soft-roader designed primarily for hauling kids. Fortunately for Chevy, most buyers want the latter, resulting in the new Blazer crossover being very popular.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
RS trim blackens out most of the Blazer’s chrome details.

Granted, General Motors’ best-selling bowtie brand would’ve had a hit on its hands if they’d called it something else, like Malibu X. Ok, that last comment, while mostly true, was a jab right into the solar plexus of the just-noted blue-oval brand that once did something near identical with its mid-size Taurus nameplate, which just happened to share underpinnings with their renamed Freestyle crossover SUV. In all seriousness, though, I would’ve rather seen Chevy bring out a new Colorado-based SUV wearing the Blazer badge than anything riding on the back of GM’s mid-size platform (although the Blazer’s C1XX architecture is actually a somewhat modified crossover variant of the Malibu’s E2XX platform). Now, if GM has a change of heart, wanting to take advantage of rough and rugged 4×4 popularity, they won’t be able to use the classic Blazer nameplate. At least Jimmy is still available for GMC.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
The details are very nice, particularly the standard LED headlamps.

The General has made a lot of mistakes in the past and this latest misnomer may one day be perceived as a significant missed opportunity that simultaneously sullied a once-great name, but for now the majority of thirty- to forty-something parents buying this new five-seat Chevrolet will be happy it looks like a bulked-up Camaro (and wasn’t actually named Camaro… ahem, another knock on Ford that dubbed its two-row crossover SUV the Mustang Mach-E) and leave it at that.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
Sporty dual exhaust system sounds good for the class.

The RS I spent a week with is the most Camaro-like trim of the lot, particularly in red. Like it or lose it, this SUV is an attention-getter. This said, no one should expect its rectangular dual exhaust to bark like a ZL1, let alone an LT1 with the upgraded V6. What’s more, the Blazer’s spin on Chevy’s 3.6-litre V6 doesn’t put out the Camaro’s 335 horsepower and 284 lb-ft of torque either, but in this fairly staid consumer-driven category its 308 horsepower and 270 ft-lb of torque is impressive. It manages a zero-to-100 km/h sprint of 6.5 seconds too, and while this is half-a-second off Ford’s Edge ST, at least the Chevy looks quicker.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
Chevy continues the red and black theme inside.

The Blazer boasts an extra forward gear as well, counting in at nine compared to eight for Ford’s mid-size alternative, while both use all-wheel drive systems that are best kept on pavement, or light-duty gravel at worst.

Not all Blazers receive this upmarket V6, by the way, with lesser trims incorporating GM’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder that also comes in the base Camaro. Can you see a pattern here? Like the V6, the base Blazer’s output is detuned from the sporty muscle car’s, making 227 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque instead of a respective 275 and 295, but that’s better than the U.S.-spec base model’s naturally-aspirated 2.5-litre engine that only manages 193 literal ponies and 188 lb-ft (ok, they’re not literal ponies, but they’re much smaller horses). As for the Edge, it’s base 2.0-litre turbo-four makes 250 horsepower and 275 lb-ft of torque in both markets, which is what we’d call competitive.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
The Blazer interior is well organized and nicely finished.

The Blazer’s nine-speed autobox mentioned a moment ago doesn’t include steering column-mounted paddle shifters, even in this sporty RS trim line, but Chevy does include a thumb-controlled rocker switch directly on the shift knob, which isn’t any more engaging than pushing a gear lever to and fro. At least the transmission is a soothingly smooth shifter, if not particularly quick about the job at hand. Yes, once again this Blazer RS is no Camaro crossover, in spirit at least, but it’s highly unlikely the majority of its buyers would drive it like it was stolen, so it’s probably a moot point.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
The primary gauges aren’t fully digital, but it comes close.

More importantly, this SUV is easy on fuel. Chevy claims estimated mileage of 13.1 L/100km city, 9.4 highway and 11.4 combined for this V6-powered version, achievable because its part-time all-wheel drive system pushes all of its power to the front wheels when extra traction isn’t required. When needed, simply rotate a console-mounted knob from x2” to “x4” and Bob’s your uncle. The same dial can be used to select sport mode as well, or for that matter a towing mode.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
Chevy does infotainment systems well.

With the former mode chosen, the Blazer RS really moves off the line, almost completely fulfilling the promise made by its fast-when-standing-still styling. If only the nine-speed automatic’s response to shifts was quicker, the smooth and comforting transmission needing more than two seconds to set up the next shift. I suppose it’s more fun to row through the gears than the majority of CVTs, but only just. It kicks down well enough for passing procedures, and there’s plenty of power and torque afoot, so the engine makes up for the gearbox once engaged. Even better, the Blazer RS handles.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
The Blazer’s 9-speed automatic is smooth, but not very sporty.

Yup, this SUV can snake through corners with ease, with some thanks to the sizeable 265/45R21 Continental CrossContact all-season tires attached to the ground below. I made a point of seeking out some favourite curving riverside two-laners and a relatively local mountainside switchback to be sure of its capabilities, and was rewarded with confidence-inspiring poise under pressure. Even when pushing harder than I probably should have, the Blazer never deviated from my chosen lane and hardly seemed to lean much at all. Even more important in this class, suspension compliancy was just right, always smooth and comfortable and never harsh.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
The red-highlighted black leather driver’s seat is very comfortable.

Comfort’s where it’s at in this mid-size SUV segment, and to that end Chevy has done a good job finishing off the Blazer RS interior. Style-wise it’s no walnut-laden, camel-coloured leather luxury ute, but instead once again does its best impersonation of a tall, five-seat Camaro. Of course, I only mean that when it comes to interior design, as this Chevy RS is a lot more utile than any 2+2 muscle car, thanks to generous front and rear seat room for all sizes in all seating positions. It’s cargo area is accommodating too, complete with 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks to expand on its usefulness when needed.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
Let the light shine in! How we love big, beautiful panoramic sunroofs.

As far as luxury accoutrements go, Chevy made sure to infuse the cabin with padded surfaces aplenty. Most composites and leathers were in a dark anthracite bordering on black, with red being the highlight colour, as if you couldn’t have guessed without looking inside. I say most composites because the design team chose to ring each dash-mounted air vent with a red bezel, the bright splash of colour at least not clashing with the red and blue heating and cooling arrows positioned nearby. There’s a tiny drop of red plastic on the gear shift lever too, providing a backdrop to the “RS” logo, and no shortage of red thread throughout the rest of the cabin, not to mention some red dye visible through the leather seats’ perforations. It all looks appropriately sporty, with fit, finish and materials quality that matches most others in the segment.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
The second row is generously sized and very comfortable.

I will give a special nod to Chevy’s mostly digital primary gauge cluster and centre-mounted infotainment display, however, which are a touch above most rivals. The former, which includes an 8.0-inch multi-information display at centre, features stylish, tasteful graphics and plenty of bright colours, plus clear, high-resolution screen quality, and a solid collection of useful functions. Over to the right, the infotainment display is a touchscreen for easy use, especially when using smartphone/tablet-like tap, swipe and pinch finger gestures, and once again its graphically attractive and filled with functions, such as Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, accurate navigation, a good backup camera, etcetera.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
No shortage for all your gear in this mid-size Chevy crossover.

The RS comes equipped with some other notable features too, such as a big panoramic glass sunroof up above, a heated steering wheel rim and heatable front seats, dual-zone automatic climate control, a hands-free powered liftgate, a sportier front grille, and 99.9-percent of its exterior chrome trim replaced by glossy black (the “RS” logo gets trimmed in metal brightwork for tradition’s sake).

After everything is said and done, Chevy’s Blazer RS will either make you race over to the brand’s website to deliberate over colours before checking out local dealer sites in order to see what’s in stock, or leave you questioning how the heartbeat of America could’ve missed such a great opportunity to bring back a real off-road capable SUV. Sure you can still step up to a full-size Tahoe or Suburban, both worthy 4x4s in their own rights, but something smaller to compete with the Broncos, Wranglers and even the Toyota 4Runners of the world would’ve been nice… and smart.

2021 Chevrolet Blazer RS
One of the sportier engines in the mid-size crossover SUV class.

As it is, the 2021 Blazer RS starts at $46,698 plus freight and fees, whereas a base Blazer LT can be had for $37,198. Take note that our 2021 Chevrolet Blazer Canada Prices page was showing up to $1,000 in additional incentives at the time of writing, while CarCostCanada members are saving an average of $3,625 after using our dealer invoice pricing info when negotiating their best deal. CarCostCanada members are also privy to information about manufacturer financing and leasing deals, plus they get the latest news on factory rebates. Make sure to learn more about how the CarCostCanada system works, and remember to download our free app so you can have everything you need at your fingertips before walking into a new car showroom.

Story and photos by Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro Road Test

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
Audi’s Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro looks fabulous, even with a utilitarian roof rack on top.

Style. Some have it, and others just don’t. A small handful, on the other hand, are not only in style, but in fact set the trends. Audi has long been one such brand, often lauded for its leadership in design and execution, while the new Q8 has become one of the automaker’s key style-setters.

While hardly an initiator in the SUV coupe category, the Q8’s edgy lines and sleek, low-slung profile has certainly made up for lost time. As you may already know, it shares hard points with a number of other Volkswagen group crossover utilities, namely Porsche’s Cayenne Coupe and Lamborghini’s Urus, while its MLB platform underpinnings can be found in Audi’s own Q7, plus the regular Cayenne, Volkswagen’s Touareg (in other markets) and at the other end of the spectrum, Bentley’s Bentayga.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The Q8’s rear design is easily as attractive as its front end.

This means that along with its dashing good looks it’s an SUV that can run with the best in the industry, and believe me the Q8 can hold its own on a curving backroad. The Q8 plays alongside BMW’s X6 and Mercedes’ GLE Coupe, the former being the first-ever SUV coupe, while most others in this sector are much higher priced alternatives such as Maserati’s Levante (which is more of a regular crossover SUV despite being very sleek), Aston Martin’s DBX, and soon Ferrari’s Purosangue.

The Q8 is not only more affordable than the exotics just mentioned, but my tester’s Technik 55 TFSI Quattro trim line is considerably more approachable than the mid-range SQ8 or top-line RS Q8. Our 2021 Audi Q8 Canada Prices page shows suggested pricing of $91,200 plus freight and fees, which adds $8,650 to the price of a base Q8 Progressiv model, while Audi is currently offering up to $4,000 in additional incentives on both 2021 and 2020 models, and average CarCostCanada member savings are $3,875.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The standard LED headlamps are stunning.

The Q8 arrived for 2019, by the way, and other than an assortment of tech features that have been added to the base Progressiv trim since its initial year, 2019, 2020 and 2021 versions are mostly the same. The Q8 Technik shown on this page is pretty well fully loaded, so it’s pretty well the same vehicle as a 2021.

Obviously the Q8’s base price makes its placement within Audi’s SUV hierarchy clear, the sporty mid-sizer positioned above the Q7, the two Q5 models, and of course the Q3, at least as far as non-electrics go. Audi has a lineup of EVs now, including the E-Tron and new E-Tron Sportback (Audi-speak for an SUV Coupe), while the second Q5 I just mentioned is another Sportback, making a total of three SUV coupes in the Ingolstadt brand’s lineup.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
These painted alloys help this all-black Q8 look particularly menacing.

SUV coupes are arguably better looking, unless you’re more of a traditionalist, but there is a trade-off. It comes in the way of rear headroom and cargo capacity, the second row more than adequately sized for most adults, but the Q8’s dedicated luggage space down significantly from the Q7 and even some of the regularly proportioned five-passenger SUVs it might be up against. Even the GLE Coupe offers more room behind its rear seats, but the Q8 edges out the X6.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The Q8’s cabin is impeccably finished.

Now that we’re talking about practical issues, the base Q8 powertrain delivers decent fuel economy. Driven with a tempered right foot you’ll be able to eke out 13.8 L/100km in the city, 11.7 on the highway and 12.7 combined, but that’s probably not how you’re going to want to drive it.

Sorry for the yawn-fest, but I needed to get the mundanities out of the way before talking performance. Fortunately for enthusiasts like us, Audi chose not to go all pragmatic with its Q8 powertrains, leaving the Q7’s 248 horsepower turbocharged four-cylinder off the menu and instead opting for its 335 horsepower V6 in base models. That’s a healthy dose of energy for any SUV, but even more for a lighter weight five-passenger ute like the Q8. It pushes out 369 lb-ft of torque as well, all from a 3.0-litre V6-powered with a single turbo, so off-the-line acceleration is strong and highway passing manoeuvres are effortless.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The Q8’s driving environment is amongst the best in its class.

Not as effortless as passing would be in a 500 horsepower SQ8, mind you, or for that matter the near Urus levels of straight-line power offered up by the 591 horsepower RS Q8. These two put 568 and 590 lb-ft of torque down to the tarmac respectively, so launching from standstill would be exhilarating to say the least. Is 3.8 seconds to 100 km/h good enough for you? That’s as quick as Bentley’s W12-powered Bentayga, and only 0.2 seconds off the Urus’ 3.6-second sprint. The mid-range SQ8 is fast too, but 4.3 seconds from zero to 100 km/h is not quite as awe-inspiring, while the 55 TFSI Quattro’s 6.0-second run is definitely quick enough to leave most traffic behind when the light goes green.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The digital gauge cluster’s multi-info display can be enlarged to take up most o the area.

Speaking of fast, the Q8’s ZF-sourced eight-speed auto is both silky smooth and wonderfully quick-shifting when pushing hard, while Quattro continues Audi’s advanced tradition in all-wheel drive, delivering superb traction in all conditions. Adding to the experience, Audi provides Comfort, Auto, Dynamic (sport), Individual and Off Road “drive select” modes, the sportiest enhancing the Q8’s direct electromechanical steering design and nicely-tuned five-link front and rear suspension setup, resulting in a luxury SUV that’s comfortable when needed, and plenty of fun through the curves.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The Q8’s centre display will impress.

Comfort is the Q8 55 TFSI Quattro’s primary purpose, however, and one look inside makes this immediately known. Its interior design typifies Audi’s contemporary minimalism, while the quality of materials is second to none. My test model’s cabin was mostly done out in a subdued charcoal grey, other than the large sections of piano black lacquered trim running across the instrument panel and lower console. These perfectly bled into the numerous electronic displays, while Audi added some stylish brown details to visually warm up what could come across as a cold grey motif. Yes, even the open-pore hardwood inlays were stained grey, although ample brushed aluminum trim and the big panoramic sunroof overhead helped to lighten the mood.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
A separate display for the HVAC system frees up space on the infotainment screen.

The aforementioned displays brightened the gauge cluster and centre stack too, with attractive graphics and brilliantly clear high-definition resolution. The former, dubbed “Audi Virtual Cockpit,” is 100-percent digital and wonderfully customizable, plus can be modded so that the centre-mounted multi-information display takes over the entire screen via a “VIEW” button located on the steering wheel spoke. My favourite choice of multi-info functions for this full-size view is the navigation map, which looks fabulous and frees the centre display for other duties, like scrolling through satellite radio stations, while multi-zone heating and ventilation controls can be found on a separate touchscreen just below.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
This is one smooth eight-speed operator.

The previously noted “drive select” modes can be found on a thin strip of touch-sensitive interface just under the HVAC display. Also included is a button for cancelling traction and stability control, turning on the hazard lights, and selecting defog/defrost settings. This switchgear, plus all others in the Q8’s well laid out interior, is impressively made.

Of course, we’ve all come to expect this level of detail from Audi, as is the case for cabin comfort. Of upmost importance to me is any vehicle’s driving position, due to a torso that’s not as long as my legs, therefore once my seat has been powered rearward enough to accommodate the latter, I often require more reach from the telescopic steering column than some models provide in order to achieve maximum control while comfortably holding the rim of the wheel. If that reach isn’t there, I’ve got to crank my seatback to a less than ideal vertical position, which is never a good first impression. In the Q8’s case, nothing I just said was even necessary, other than to point out that its driving position is near perfect.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
Ready for supreme comfort? Even including a massage?

Of course, the amply adjustable driver’s seat had much to do with that. It includes an extendable lower cushion that nicely cups under the knees, a favourite feature, while together with the usual fore/aft, up/down, recline and four-way lumbar support functions was a wonderful massage feature that gently eased back pain via wave, pulse, stretch, relaxation, shoulder, and activation modes, not to mention three intensity levels. Industry norm three-temperature heatable cushions were combined with three-way cooling, making a very good thing just that much better.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
An expansive panoramic sunroof opens up the world.

With my seat pushed back far enough to fit my long-legged albeit still short five-foot-eight frame, I still had more than enough space in all directions, while I could nearly stretch out fully when sitting behind the driver’s seat in the second row. With only two seated in back, the Q8’s wide, comfortable centre armrest can be folded down. It features the usual twin cupholders, plus controls for the power-operated side-window sunshades, which can be operated by someone seated on either side of the rear bench. A climate control interface allows adjustment of another two zones in back, for a total of four. This is where you’ll find buttons for the rear outboard seat heaters.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
Rear seat comfort and roominess is above par.

I’ve already mentioned the Q8’s cargo volume, so rather than going down this memory hole one more time I’ll just reiterate that most should find it adequate. It’s very well finished, as you might expect, with full carpeting and a stylish aluminum protective plate on the hatch sill, plus bright metal tie-down hooks at each corner, not to mention a useful webbed storage area to the side. I especially appreciation folding rear seatbacks split in the optimal 40/20/40 configuration, which allows for longer items like skis to be stored down the middle while rear occupants benefit from the more comfortable heatable window seats.

2020 Audi Q8 Technik 55 TFSI Quattro
The Q8’s cargo compartment isn’t the largest in the class, but it’s not the smallest either.

I’ve already mentioned pricing and likely discounts, but you’ll need to go to CarCostCanada to find out how to access the deals. Their very affordable membership gives you money-saving info on available manufacturer rebates, factory financing and leasing deals, plus dealer invoice pricing that’s like having insider information before negotiating your best deal. Find out how a CarCostCanada membership will save you money on your next new vehicle, and download their free app too, so you can access critical info when you need it most.

All said, the Q8 would be a good way to apply all knowledge you’ll gain from a CarCostCanada membership. While practical and fuel efficient, it’s drop-dead gorgeous from the outside in, includes some of the best quality materials available, comes equipped with an impressive assortment of standard and optional features, is wonderfully comfortable in every seating position, and delivers strong performance no matter the road conditions.

Story by Trevor Hofmann

Photos by Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

Porsche increases battery size and EV range of the 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
All 2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid models get a bump in battery size for increased range.

Just in case you’re having a déjà vu moment, rest assured that you previously read an article on this site about Porsche E-Hybrid battery improvements, but at that time we were covering Panamera variants and now it’s all about the electrified Cayenne.

Like last year, both the regular Cayenne crossover SUV and the sportier looking Cayenne Coupe will receive Porsche’s E-Hybrid and Turbo S E-Hybrid power units, but new for 2021 are battery cells that are better optimized and improve on energy density, thus allowing a 27-percent increase in output and nearly 30 percent greater EV range.

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe
Although it looks as if it should be faster, the 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe is a fraction slower to 100 km/h than the regular body style.

The new battery, up from 14.1 kWh to 17.9, expands the Cayenne E-Hybrid’s range from about 22 or 23 km between charges to almost 30 km, which will force fewer trips to the gas station when using their plug-in Porsches for daily commutes. Likewise, the heftier Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid gets an EV range bump up from approximately 19 or 20 km to 24 or 25 km.

Added to this, Porsche has reworked how these Cayenne plug-ins utilize their internal combustion engines (ICE) when charging the battery. The battery now tops off at 80 percent instead of 100, which in fact saves fuel while reducing emissions. Say what? While this might initially seem counterintuitive, it all comes down to the E-Hybrid’s various kinetic energy harvesting systems, like regenerative braking, that aren’t put to use if the battery reaches a 100-percent fill. Cap off the charge at 80 percent and these systems are always in use, and therefore do their part in increasing efficiency.

2021 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The regular Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid body style and the Coupe are identically quick.

Additionally, the larger 17.9 kWh battery can charge quicker in Sport and Sport Plus performance modes and default or Eco modes, making sure the drive system always has ample boost when a driver wants to maximize acceleration or pass a slower vehicle.

Net horsepower and combined torque remain the same as last year’s Cayenne plug-in hybrid models despite the bigger battery, with the 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid retaining its 455 net horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque rating, and both Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid body styles pushing out a sensational 670 net horsepower along with 663 lb-ft of twist.

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
No matter the 2021 Cayenne body style or trim line, the view from inside is impressive.

Standard Cayenne E-Hybrid models can sprint from zero to 100 km/h in just 5.0 seconds when equipped with the Sport Chrono Package, before maxing out at a terminal velocity of 253 km/h, while the Sport Chrono Package equipped Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe requires an additional 0.1-second to achieve the same top speed. Alternatively, both regular and coupe Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid body styles catapult from standstill to 100 km/h in an identical 3.8 seconds, with the duo also topping out at 295 km/h.

The 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid starts at $93,800 plus freight and fees, while the Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe is available from $100,400. After that, the Turbo S E-Hybrid can be had from $185,600, and lastly the Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe starts at $191,200. You can order the new electrified Cayenne models now, with first deliveries expected by spring.

Take note that Porsche is offering factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent, so be sure to visit our 2021 Porsche Cayenne Canada Prices page to find out all the details. CarCostCanada also provides manufacturer rebate information, when available, plus dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands on your next purchase. Learn how it all works by clicking on this link, and also download our free app.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550 Road Test

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
The new second-gen G-Class stays true to its iconic design and purpose.

Few vehicles ever earn “icon” status. They’re either not around long enough, or their manufacturers change them so dramatically from their original purpose that only the name remains.

Case in point, Chevy’s new car-based Blazer family hauler compared to Ford’s go-anywhere Bronco. One is a complete departure from the arguably iconic truck-based original, whereas the other resurrects a beloved nameplate with new levels of on- and off-road prowess.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
For crossover buyers the G will be too boxy, but to serious SUV fans it’s just right.

Land Rover has done something similar with its new Defender, yet due to radically departing from the beloved 1990-2016 first-generation Defender 90 and 110 models’ styling (which was based on the even more legendary 1948-1958 Series I, 1958-1961 Series II, 1961-1971 Series IIA, and 1971-1990 Series III) it runs the risk of losing the nameplate’s iconic status.

In fact, a British billionaire eager to cash in on Land Rover’s possible mistake is building a modernized version of the classic Defender 110 for those with deep pockets, dubbed the Ineos Grenadier (Ineos being the multinational British chemical company partly owned by said billionaire, Jim Ratcliffe). That the Grenadier was partly developed and is being produced by Magna Steyr in its Graz, Austria facility, yes, the same Magna Steyr that builds the Mercedes-Benz G-Class being tested here, is an interesting coincidence, but I digress. The more important point being made is that Mercedes’ G-Class never needed resurrecting. Like Jeep’s Wrangler, albeit at a much loftier price point, the G-wagon has remained true to its longstanding design and defined purpose from day one, endowing it with cult-like status.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
The G 550’s LED headlights look much the same as the old model’s from a distance, but inside they’re much more advanced.

The G-Class was thoroughly overhauled for the 2019 model year, this being the SUV’s second generation despite more than 40 years of production, so as you can likely imagine, changes to this 2020 model and the upcoming 2021 version are minimal. The same G 550 and sportier AMG G 63 trims remain available, but the more trail-specified 2017-2018 G 550 4×4 Squared, as well as the more pavement-performance focused 2016-2018 AMG G 65 haven’t been offered yet, nor for that matter has the awesome six-wheel version, therefore we’ll need to watch and wait to see what Mercedes has in store.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
This G 550’s wheel and tire package meant it remained on-road.

The 2019 exterior updates included plenty of new body panels, plus revised head and tail lamp designs (that aren’t too much of a departure from the original in shape and size), and lastly trim modifications all-round. The model’s squared-off, utilitarian body style remains fully intact, which is most important to the SUV’s myriad hardcore fans.

While I’m supposed to be an unbiased reporter, truth be told I’m also a fan of this chunky off-roader. In fact, I’m actually in the market for a diesel-powered four-door Geländewagen (or a left-hand drive, long-wheelbase Toyota Land Cruiser 70 Series diesel in decent shape), an earlier version more aligned with my budget restraints and less likely to cause tears when inevitably scratching it up off-road. Of course, if personal finances allowed me to keep the very G 550 in my possession for this weeklong test, I’d be more than ok with that too, as it’s as good as 4×4-capable SUVs get.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
Simple and small, yet filled with LEDs for faster response to brake input.

While first- to second-generation G-Class models won’t be immediately noticeable to casual onlookers, step inside and the differences are dramatic. The new model features a totally new dash design and higher level of refinement overall, including the brand’s usual jewel-like metalwork trim, and bevy of new digital interfaces that fully transform its human/machine operation. Your eyes will likely lock onto Mercedes’ new MBUX digital instrument cluster/infotainment touchscreen first, which incorporates dual 12.3-inch displays within one long, horizontal, glass-like surface.

The right-side display is a touchscreen, but can alternatively be controlled by switchgear on the lower centre console, while the main driver display can be modulated via an old Blackberry-style micro-pad on the left steering wheel spoke. Together, the seemingly singular interface is one of my industry favourites, not only in functionality, which is superb, but from a styling perspective as well.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
Everything about the new G’s interior is better.

The majority of other interior switchgear is satin-silver-finished or made from knurled aluminum, resulting in a real sense of occasion, which while hardly new for Mercedes is a major improvement for the G-Class. Likewise, the drilled Burmester surround sound speaker grilles are some of the prettiest available anywhere, as are the deep, rich open-pore hardwood inlays that envelope the primary gauge cluster/infotainment binnacle, the surface of the lower console, and the trim around the doors’ armrests.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
Compared to the outgoing G-Class, the new model is over the top in refinement and luxury.

The G isn’t devoid of hard composites, but centre console side panels that don’t quite meet pricey expectations aren’t enough to complain about, particularly when the SUV’s door panel and seat upholstery leatherwork is so fine. My test model’s interior also featured beautiful chocolate brown details that contrasted its sensational blue exterior paint well.

Driver’s seat bolstering is more than adequate, as are the chair’s other powered adjustments, the only missing element being an adjustable thigh support extension. Still, its lower cushion cupped below my knees nicely enough, which, while possibly a problem for drivers on the short side, managed my five-foot-eight frame adequately. At least the SUV’s four-way powered lumbar support applied the right amount of pressure to the exact spot on my lower back requiring relief, as it should for most body types. Likewise, the G 550’s tilt and telescopic steering column provided plenty of reach, resulting in a near perfect driving position despite my short-torso, long-legged body.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
The left half of the large driving display is for the primary instruments and multi-info display, controllable via steering wheel switchgear, whereas the right half is an infotainment touchscreen.

As part of the redesign, Mercedes increased rear seat legroom to allow taller passengers the ability to stretch out in comfort. What’s more, those back seats are nearly as supportive as the ones in front, other than the centre position that’s best left for smaller adults or kids.

All of this refinement is hardly inexpensive, with the base 2020 G 550 priced at $147,900 plus freight and fees, and the 2021 version starting at an even heftier $154,900. This said, our 2020 and 2021 Mercedes-Benz G-Class Canada Prices pages are currently reporting factory leasing and financing rates from zero-percent, which could go far in making a new G-Class more affordable. The zero-interest rate deal seems to apply to the $195,900 2020 G 63 AMG as well, plus the $211,900 2021 G 63 AMG, so it might make sense to buy this SUV on credit and invest the money otherwise spent (I’m guessing commodities are a good shot considering government promises of infrastructure builds, inflated currencies, runaway debt, market bubbles, etcetera, but in no way take my miscellaneous ramblings as investment advice).

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
All of the G 550’s buttons, switches and knobs are superbly crafted.

By the way, along with information about factory financing and leasing deals, CarCostCanada provides Canadian consumers with info about manufacturer rebates when available, plus dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. Find out more about how CarCostCanada’s very affordable membership can work for you, and remember to download our free smartphone app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store, so you can have all of this great information at your fingertips anytime, anywhere.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
If you’d rather not use the touchscreen, Mercedes offers this well-designed controller on the lower console.

Anytime or anywhere in mind, the G 550 can pretty well get you everywhere in Canada, anytime of the year. There’s absolutely no need to expend more investment to buy aftermarket off-road components when at the wheel of this big Merc, as it can out-hustle most any other 4×4-capable SUV on the market. While I would’ve liked even more opportunities to shake the G-Class out on unpaved roads, I certainly enjoyed the number of instances I did so, and can attest to their greatness off the beaten path. I’ve waded them over rock-strewn hills, negotiated them around jagged canyon walls and between narrow treed trails, coaxed them through fast-paced rivers and muddy marshes, and even felt their tires slip when dipped into soft, sandy stretches of beach, so my desire to own one comes from experience. Just the same I didn’t want to risk damaging my G 550 test model’s stylish 14-spoke alloys on pavement-spec 275/50 Pirelli Scorpion Zero rubber, so I kept this example on the street.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
The G 550’s driver’s seat is sublime.

The G 550’s ride was sublime even with these lower-profile performance tires, which goes to show that car-based unibody designs don’t really improve ride quality, as much as at-the-limit handling. The G-Class’ frame is rigid after all, as is its body structure, while its significant suspension travel only aids ride compliance. Therefore, it made the ideal city companion, its suspension nearly eliminating the types of ruts and bridge expansion joints that intrude on the comfort levels of lesser SUVs, while its extreme height provides excellent visibility all around.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
Even rear passengers get the royal treatment, the Burmester audio system’s speaker grille’s beautifully made.

Those who spend more time on the open highway shouldn’t be wary of the G 550 either, as its ride continued to please and high-speed stability inspired confidence. I would’ve loved to have been towing an Airstream Flying Cloud in back to test its 7,000-lb rating (and given me more comfort than my tent), but I’m sure it can manage the load well, especially when factoring in its 2,650-kg (5,845-lb) curb weight.

Despite that heft, the G 550 performs fairly well when cornering, the previously noted Pirellis proving to be a good choice for everyday driving. I’ve previously driven the AMG-tuned G 63 on road and track, so the G 550’s abilities didn’t blow me away, but it certainly handles curves better than its blocky, brick-like shape alludes.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
Mercedes increased rear passenger legroom in the second-gen G-Class, making it more comfortable for larger occupants.

Braking is strong for such a big, heavy ute too, and while the G 550’s 416-horsepower 4.0-litre, twin-turbocharged V8 can’t send it from standstill to 100 km/h at the same 4.5-second rate as the 577-hp G 63, its 5.9 seconds for the same feat is nonetheless respectable, its 450 lb-ft of torque, quick-shifting eight-speed automatic, and standard four-wheel drive aiding the process perfectly, not to mention a very engaging Sport mode.

Engaging might not be the best word for it, mind you. In fact, I found the G 550’s Sport mode a bit too aggressive for my tastes, bordering on uncomfortable. It helps the big SUV shoot off the line with aggression, but the sheer force of it all snapped my head back into the seat’s pillowy headrests too often for comfort’s sake, but only when trying to move off the line in particularly quick fashion. When first feathering the throttle, as I usually drive, and then shortly thereafter dipping into it for stronger acceleration, it worked fine. I wish Mercedes’ had integrated a smoother start into the SUV’s firmware, but the requirement to use skill in order to get the most out of it was kind of nice too. All said, at the end of such tests I just left it in Eco mode for blissfully smooth performance and better economy.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
The G’s cargo door swings to the side in order to support the rear-mounted full-size spare, but unlike Jeep’s Wrangler it provides easy curb-side access.

Fuel sipping in mind, no amount of technology this side of turbo-diesel power (how I miss those days) can make this brute eco-friendly, with Transport Canada’s fuel economy rating measuring 18.0 L/100km city, 14.1 highway, and 16.3 combined. It’s not worse than some other full-size, V8-powered utilities, nor does it thirst for pricier premium fuel, but this might be an issue for those with a greener conscious.

Speaking of pragmatic issues, the G-Class is a bit short on cargo capacity when comparing to some of those full-size SUV rivals just noted, especially American branded alternatives such as the Cadillac Escalade and Lincoln Navigator. Then again, the G fares better when measuring up to similarly equipped European luxury utes, with the 1,079-litre (38.1 cu-ft) dedicated cargo area a sizeable 178 litres (6.3 cu ft) greater than the full-size Range Rover’s maximum luggage volume. Interestingly, both luxury SUV’s load-carrying capacity is an identical 1,942 litres (68.6 cu ft), which is ample in my books.

2020 Mercedes-Benz G 550
There’s lots of room for gear in the back of the G, but take note the rear seats don’t fold flat.

After my week with Mercedes’ top-line SUV, I can’t complain. Certainly, I would’ve liked a larger sunroof or, even better, something along the lines of the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited’s new Sky One-Touch Power Top that turns the entire rooftop into open air while still maintaining solid sides and back with windows, but this might weaken the G’s body structure and limit its 4×4 prowess. I also would’ve liked a wireless phone charger, and would have one installed if this was my personal ride.

Hopefully my next G-Class tester will be more suitable to wilderness forays, possibly as an updated gen-2 G 550 4×4²? Previous examples included portal axles like Mercedes’ fabulously capable Unimog, but in just about every other respect I was thoroughly impressed with this well-made luxury utility, and glad Mercedes stayed true to this model’s iconic 4×4 heritage. To me, the G-Glass is the ultimate on-road, off-road compromise, and I’d own one if money allowed.

Story and photos by Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

Genesis expanding luxury lineup to include new 2022 GV70 compact crossover

2022 Genesis GV70
The upcoming 2022 GV70 looks a lot like Genesis’ larger mid-size GV80.

Only last year we were wondering when Hyundai Motor’s new Genesis luxury division would enter the profitable crossover SUV sector, and now we not only have the GV80 mid-size model, but an all-new GV70 compact is on the way as well.

The GV70, which will be introduced for the 2022 model year, should arrive towards the end of this year, and if any of the brand’s other new models are a sign of things to come, it’ll be worth the wait.

2022 Genesis GV70
Sleek and stylish GV70 lines should make this small crossover SUV a crowd pleaser.

If you were expecting anything other than a shrunken GV80 you’ll be disappointed, because the new GV70 merely takes Genesis’ latest design language to more affordable proportions. Squarely fitting within the compact luxury crossover SUV category, to duke it out with such stalwarts as Mercedes’ GLC, Audi’s Q5, Acura’s RDX, BMW’s X3 and the like, the GV70 proudly wears Genesis’ now trademark twinned horizontal LED headlamp clusters and similarly straked LED taillights at the rear, albeit forgoes the GV80’s front fender garnishes that follow the same pattern (there was likely no room to fit them into the smaller SUV’s design). We think the design looks cleaner without them, but no doubt many will disagree.

2022 Genesis GV70
Long and lean, the new GV70 should seat five comfortably and haul ample cargo for the class.

While the engine vent-style fender trim is a minor differentiator, the GV70 takes some significant departures from the GV80 inside, where the entire lower portion of the instrument panel appears inspired by surfboarding. The oval interface sits just under the gauge cluster before stretching across to the centre stack area, houses a bevy of controls that would normally be found on separate panels to the left of the driver’s knees and further down the centre console, but instead are placed on this horizontal housing. The design works aesthetically, and appears to follow a traditional layout as far as control placement goes, with the overall appearance being the only departure from the norm.

2022 Genesis GV70
The GV70 breaks the mould with its new instrument panel design.

Up above, a fully digital instrument cluster can be found in the usual spot ahead of the driver, plus a large centre display is placed upright atop the dash, with infotainment and driving controls beautifully integrated within the lower console. The interior succeeds in making everything next to Mercedes’ GLC look outdated, which is a good way to cause newcomers to take notice of the Genesis brand.

Following compact luxury SUV tradition, the new GV70 shares underpinnings with the sporty G70 compact sedan, so it will no doubt be a lot of fun for its driver and require good seat bolstering for any passengers that come along for the ride (the GV70 seats up to five), as Genesis’ entry-level car is one of the better handlers in its highly competitive class.

2022 Genesis GV70
The surfboard-styled interface below the primary instruments houses switchgear normally separated onto separate panels.

As far as engines and transmissions go, we expect the base powertrain to be Genesis’ 2.5-litre turbocharged four-cylinder that makes 290 horsepower and 310 and lb-ft of torque in G70 trim, while an updated V6 will probably power higher priced GV70 models, the current six-cylinder putting out 375 horsepower and 391 lb-ft of torque in the GV80.

Speaking of new, Genesis has promised two new models per year until they fill up their lineup, so we can expect an even smaller subcompact luxury SUV as well as a smaller entry-level car, mostly likely along the lines of Audi’s popular A3 (it is the top seller in its class after all), but no one knows how many market segments (and niches) the brand will attempt to fill.

2022 Genesis GV70
Infotainment is a Genesis strong suit.

For the time being, Genesis offers the compact G70, mid-size G80 and full-size G90 sport-luxury sedans, as well as the new GV80 mid-size luxury crossover SUV, which can all be priced out with trims and options by going to their individual pages within CarCostCanada, where you’ll also be able to find out about any manufacturer rebates, manufacturer backed leasing and financing deals, and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. Learn how a CarCostCanada membership works too, and be sure to download the free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store in order to have all of this key information at hand when you need it most.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Genesis