Porsche rings in first decade of Panamera availability with new 10 Years Edition

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
Sensational looking gold on black 10 Years Edition can be had in other body colours too. (Photo: Porsche)

Take a look at your phone, or maybe your partner’s. Is it rimmed in gold? The colour of royalty, jewellery and all things decadent was a bit out of fashion for the past few decades, with most watches and trinkets finished in platinum, white gold, silver or (ahem) stainless steel, but more recently gold has made a comeback, now blinging up our electronic devices, accessories and even our cars.

Thoughts of glittering gold adorned Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz coupes and convertibles might be a painful a memory for some, so don’t worry, the new 2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition, which celebrates a full decade of the four-door coupe’s production, uses a softer hue dubbed White Gold Metallic that’s tastefully applied to the 21-inch Panamera Sport Design alloy wheels as well as a special “Panamera10” insignia painted onto the front doors, while simultaneously getting etched into the door treadplates and inlaid within the instrument panel inside.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
Exclusive “White Gold Metallic” painted 21-inch alloys and “Panamera10″ logos enhance exterior styling. (Photo: Porsche)

A number of global markets will be offering the new Panamera 10 Years Edition package for the Sport Turismo body style, but Porsche Canada will only make the stylish new upgrade available with its regular four-door design, particularly with its base Panamera, all-wheel drive Panamera 4, and electrified Panamera 4 E-Hybrid. This said Porsche is only providing prices for the latter two trims, with the Panamera 4 10 Years Edition beginning at $122,000 plus freight and fees, which is a $17,400 increase when compared to the regular Panamera 4, and the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid 10 Years Edition that starts at $132,700, a $14,900 increase over the regular base 4 E-Hybrid.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
The 10 Years Edition interior is all black other than for gold contrast stitching. (Photo: Porsche)

While the cars in Porsche’s launch photos are black, all the usual standard and optional Panamera 4 and 4 E-Hybrid colours are available with the 10 Years Edition, while the same can be said for the interior, although you may want to stay with the unique model’s black cabin with contrasting White Gold stitching, as you’ll be forced to pay more for alternative two-tone colourways.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
Elegant “Panamera10″ script adorns the instrument panel. (Photo: Porsche)

You can learn more about 2020 Panamera 10 Years Edition packages, options and pricing right here on CarCostCanada, where you can also find out about any available rebates and otherwise difficult to find dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

Standard Panamera 4 10 Years Edition features that haven’t been mentioned yet include LED matrix headlamps, ParkAssist with Surround View, Lane Change Assist with Lane Keep Assist (LKA), 14-way comfort seats featuring Porsche crests on their headrests, soft-close doors, plus Bose surround-sound audio, while standard performance features include Porsche’s adaptive three-chamber air suspension with Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and Power Steering Plus. Those choosing the hybrid will also benefit from a more capable 7.2-kW on-board charger instead of the usual base 3.6-kW charge system.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
The special edition gets the “Panamera10″ logo on the doorsills too. (Photo: Porsche)

The Panamera 4 10 Years Edition also comes standard with Porsche’s 3.0-litre turbo-V6 engine that makes 330 horsepower, whereas the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid 10 Years Edition joins a twin-turbo 2.9-litre V6 up with an electric motor for a combined total of 457 horsepower.

The first examples of the Panamera 10 Years Edition should start arriving at Canadian Porsche dealerships during the first quarter of 2020, so be sure to call to your local Porsche retailer to learn more.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Porsche introduces affordable new Taycan 4S

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
New 4S trim brings the new 2020 Taycan down to a more palatable level of affordability. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche revealed two final production Taycan EVs last month, but without doubt some potential buyers found the Turbo and Turbo S models’ respective $173,900 and $213,900 price tags a bit too rich for their budgets. Of course, the Stuttgart, Germany-based performance brand promised more affordable versions to follow, and therefore the $119,400 Taycan 4S is upon us. Priced much closer to the $108,990 base Tesla Model S, this is the EV “volume” model Porsche needs.

So what does the $55k (or $95k) buy you? Performance. Wheels aside there’s no obvious difference to exterior or interior design, or materials quality for that matter, but in place of the Taycan Turbo’s 671 horsepower, 627 lb-ft of torque, and launch control-assisted 3.2-second run to 100 km/h sprint from standstill to 100 km/h, or the Turbo S model’s even more outrageous 750 horsepower, 774 lb-ft of torque, and 2.8-second second run to 100 km/h, the new 4S uses makes due with “just” 522 horsepower, 472 lb-ft of torque and a 4.0-second dash to the 100-km/h mark.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
Great looking and brilliantly quick, the new Taycan 4S should be a popular EV. (Photo: Porsche)

A Performance Battery Plus package is available, boosting output to 562 horsepower and torque to 479 lb-ft for a nominal difference in naught to 100 km/h sprints (although Porsche rates it at 4.0 seconds as well), yet this upgraded Taycan 4S’ shoots from standstill to 160 km/h in a scant 8.5 seconds instead of dawdling along at just 8.7 seconds. Both 4S power units limit the Taycan’s terminal velocity to 250 km/h, which incidentally is 30 km/h less speedy than the Turbo or Turbo S.

Under the Taycan 4S floorboards are 79.2 kilowatt-hours of high-voltage lithium-ion battery capable of 407 km (253 miles) of estimated range, as per the European WLTP rating system, while the enhanced 93.4-kWh Performance Plus battery provides about 463 km (288 miles) of range. This compares well with next to the Taycan Turbo’s 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 mile) claimed range and the Turbo S’ 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 mile) estimates.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
These unique LED headlights set the Taycan apart. (Photo: Porsche)

No matter the trim, the Taycan uses an industry-first 800-volt electrical architecture that makes for faster recharging due to a charge-rate of 225 kW with the Performance Battery or 270 kW for the upgraded Performance Battery Plus, making 22.5-minute 5-to-80-percent refills possible with all power unit specs. Regular 400-volt high-speed DC recharging happens at 50 kW, but an available booster can increase the charge-rate to 150 kW. You can also use the standard AC charge system at any J1772-compatible charging station, or plug it in at in at home, but charging times will be considerably longer.

Topping the Taycan up is made easier via Porsche’s new Charging Planner, which allows you to plot your route by mapping out ideal charging stations along the way. For instance, it will choose a quicker 270-kW station that can save you time when compared to a regular 50-kW DC charger, even if the quicker charger necessitates a detour from the shortest route. The Charging Planner also preconditions the battery to 20 degrees Celsius, which is best for the fastest possible charge-rate.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
The singular body-wide tail lamp is standard fare on Porsches these days. (Photo: Porsche)

Like the Taycan Turbo and Turbo S, the new 4S incorporates an all-wheel drivetrain featuring front and back axle-mounted permanently excited synchronous motors plus a two-speed transmission in the rear. Additionally, Porsche’s centrally networked 4D Chassis Control system provides real-time analysis and synchronization for the Taycan’s standard electronic damper control Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) enhanced three-chamber adaptive air suspension, which should result in impressive road-holding capability.

What’s more, Taycan customers should enjoy improvements in reliability over Tesla Model S owners, thanks to Porsche designing a completely new hairpin winding technique for the electric motor stators’ copper solenoid coils, this allowing for a copper fill factor of 70 percent compared to 45 percent when wound using the conventional method, all of which results in stronger performance and less heat.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
The Taycan is family friendly thanks to four doors. (Photo: Porsche)

Monitoring the Taycan’s mobility status is a wholly digital primary gauge cluster filled with colourful high-resolution graphics and integrated within a free-standing, curved binnacle that pulls styling cues from the brand’s legendary 911. Just to the right, the Taycan 4S’ standard 10.9-inch high-definition capacitive infotainment touchscreen sits atop the centre stack. Most will also want the optional front passenger display that was introduced last month with the Taycan Turbo and Turbo S, this innovative addition extending the graphical experience across the rest of the instrument panel.

Features in mind, the Taycan 4S receives standard Black or White exterior paint, a unique front fascia design, a glossy black painted rear diffuser and side skirts, LED headlamps with Porsche Dynamic Light System Plus (PDLS Plus), 19-inch five-spoke Taycan S Aero alloys, red-painted six-piston front and four-piston rear brake calipers (instead of the yellow-painted calipers found on the two Turbo models) biting down on 360-mm front and 358-mm rear discs, regenerative brakes (with a maximum regenerative force of 0.39 Gs and recuperation of up to 265 kWh), proximity keyless entry, ambient interior lighting, partial leather upholstery, eight-way power-adjustable front seats with driver’s side memory and more, but take note this base model won’t go into production until June, 2020. Before then, the $1,690 panoramic glass sunroof replaces the standard aluminum roof, while the optional Porsche Mobile Charger Plus isn’t available yet either, which leaves the standard Porsche Mobile Charger Connect system for early adapters.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
The Taycan 4S comes well equipped. (Photo: Porsche)

Available Taycan 4S options include a bevy of $910 metallic exterior colours, including the Taycan’s Frozen Blue launch colour shown in the photos, plus bright Mamba Green and deep Gentian Blue, as well as one $3,590 special colour, Carmine Red. Additionally, Porsche is offering two sets of optional 20-inch alloys and three 21-inch wheels, all ranging from $2,710 to $10,010, while the car’s black partial leather cabin can be upgraded to $4,710 black or multiple $5,360 two-tone leather, $7,490 solid or $8,150 two-tone Club leather, or alternatively $4,710 solid or $5,360 two-tone leather-free Race-Tex, the latter Porsche-first incorporating recycled materials that reduce the Taycan’s impact on the environmental.

The new Porsche should be near silent at speed too, due to an amazing Cd of 0.22, plus this ultra-aerodynamic design also minimizes energy use.

Porschephiles wanting a taller SUV model instead of this road-hugging four-door coupe will be glad to know that a crossover coupe dubbed Cross Turismo is on the way next year. It’s designed to go up against the Jaguar I-Pace, Tesla Model X and whatever else comes down the pike by then, so we can all look forward to that.

You can order the new 2020 Taycan 4S right now, however, just like its Turbo siblings, while its arrival date is set for summer 2020.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

New 2020 Porsche Macan Turbo almost 10 percent more powerful

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
The 2020 Macan Turbo receives a new front end design and plenty of other styling tweaks too. (Photo: Porsche)

The 2020 Macan has received such a thorough upgrade that many consider it more like newly designed generation, instead of a mid-cycle refresh. Porsche even revised its suspension, while also restyling its front and rear fascias, adding new standard LED headlamps and taillights, with those in the rear helping to give it a completely new look when viewed from behind. Now, instead of two distinct rear lighting clusters, the lenses to each side are bound together by a thin strip in between, similar to other vehicles in Porsche’s updated lineup like the entry-level 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster sports coupe and convertible, the mid-size Panamera four-door coupe, mid-size Cayenne SUV, the iconic 911, and entirely new Taycan all-electric four-door coupe. The 2020 Macan’s interior has been updated too, with a much larger standard 10.9-inch high-definition Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen display atop the centre stack. 

The renewed Macan Turbo will arrive later this year as a 2020 model, but can be ordered from your local Porsche retailer now for $94,200. If that’s a bit rich for your budget, you may be just as happy with the more fuel-efficient 2020 Macan or the seriously sporty Macan S, both base and mid-range models having arrived earlier this year, the most affordable trim starting at $56,100, with the S bridging the gap at $63,600. 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
New 20-inch Turbo wheels enhance the 2020 refresh. (Photo: Porsche)

The base Macan comes equipped with a 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine making 248 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque, capable of shooting it from zero to 100km/h in a mere 6.7 seconds, or 6.5 with its optional Sport Chrono Package, while its top speed is 227 km/h. 

Of note, all Macans feature a fully automated seven-speed dual-clutch PDK transmission with steering wheel paddle shifters, plus Porsche Traction Management (PTM) active all-wheel drive with an electronic map-controlled multi-plate clutch is also standard, as is an automatic brake differential (ABD) and anti-slip regulation (ASR). 

The second-rung Macan S sports a massive jump in straight-line performance due to a 3.0-litre V6 turbo behind its reshaped front grille, pushing 348 horsepower and 352 lb-ft of torque down to all wheels for a lickety-split acceleration time of just 5.3 seconds to 100km/h, or 5.1 with the Sport Chrono Package, while its new terminal velocity is 254 km/h. 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
The biggest change externally is a one-piece body-wide LED taillight cluster. (Photo: Porsche)

Yes, those Macan S performance numbers have been improved for 2020, so Porsche couldn’t arrive with a new Macan Turbo held back by the same engine specs. Instead, the new Turbo gets nearly 10 percent more thrust, its 2.9-litre twin-turbo V6 good for 34 more horsepower at 434, while torque remains the same at 406 lb-ft. This shaves 0.3 seconds from its zero to 100km/h sprint time, the result being 4.5 seconds or 4.3 with its Sport Chrono Package, while its terminal velocity rises by 5 km/h to 270 km/h. 

A few standard Macan Turbo performance features now include one-inch bigger 20-inch Macan Turbo alloys, Porsche Surface Coated Brakes (PSCB) that manage stops faster than the SUV’s outgoing standard braking setup, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) dampers, a sport exhaust system, and more, while a bevy of performance options include (but aren’t limited to) a height-adjustable air suspension system with rolling pistons and new shock absorber hydraulics, Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV +), and Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB). 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
Along with the 10.9-inch centre display all 2020 Macans receive, the Turbo gets Alcantara roof pillars and headliner, 18-way front seats, and more. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 2020 Macan Turbo adds some special touches inside as well, such as standard Alcantara-wrapped roof pillars and roofliner, 18-way front Adaptive Sport Seats with memory, a 665-watt Bose Surround Sound audio system boasting 14 speakers, and the list goes on. 

Its list of convenience and luxury options is long too, and includes a GT Sport steering wheel, wireless charging that comes in a package with a special Smartphone Compartment, semi-autonomous self-parking and traffic assistance systems, and more. 

The new 2020 Macan Turbo can be ordered now at your local Porsche dealer, and will arrive here in Canada toward the end of this year, while you can drive away in a new 2020 Macan and Macan S now.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

New 2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet just in time for winter

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The 2020 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet is a true all-season convertible. (Photo: Porsche)

This winter will be “colder than normal,” says The Old Farmer’s Almanac in this year’s Annual Weather Summary for Southern British Columbia, while “temperatures, precipitation, and snowfall will be above normal” in Southern Ontario. 

Yikes! Ready for the dark days of winter yet? Anyone with a reasonably good memory will get a chill when thinking back to the past two winter seasons, while February of 2019 was Vancouver’s coldest on record ever. Now, early storms are already rearing their ugly heads across Canada, bringing these bitter memories back earlier than expected, but you won’t need to concern yourself about getting around if you ante up for Porsche’s all-new redesigned 2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé or 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The new Carrera 4 sports rectangular tailpipes for a unique look. (Photo: Porsche)

The Stuttgart-based performance/luxury brand has been introducing its fresh new 911 throughout the year, and its latest Carrera 4 models couldn’t have timed their arrival better. Using the identical 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged six-cylinder “boxer” engine as found in the new Carrera 2, making 370 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque, the new Carrera 4 Coupe blasts from standstill to 100 km/h a scant 0.1 seconds faster than the Carrera 2 at just 4.5 seconds when shifted by its seven-speed manual transmission, or 4.3 seconds when mated up to its paddle-shift infused eight-speed PDK gearbox. Even better, the Carrera 4 can accomplish the same feat in a mere 4.1 seconds when Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package enhances the dual-clutch automated transmission. 

Furthermore, only 9.7 seconds is required to zip from zero to 160 km/h with the manual gearbox, or 9.3 seconds for the PDK, while the two model respectively top out at 292 and 290 km/h. If the convertible is your thing, the new Carrera 4 Cabriolet takes just 0.2 seconds longer to achieve each timed exercise, while its top speed is a lofty 289 km/h. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
Fabulous looking new Carrera 4 Coupé is even more stable in inclement weather than the previous generation. (Photo: Porsche)

Identical to the 2020 Carrera 4S released earlier this year, the redesigned Carrera 4 features a new water-cooled front differential, which includes reinforced clutches that increase load capacity and durability. Together with Porsche Traction Management (PTM), the new front axle drive system enhances the Carrera 4’s grip in slippery situations, while also improving performance in dry conditions. 

Additionally, all 2020 911 Carrera buyers get an innovative new Wet mode as part of the upgraded steering wheel-mounted driving mode selector. The smart technology automatically maintains greater control over slippery road surfaces when turned on, while all new 911 trims improve safety further via standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection, while a high-resolution rearview camera plus rear parking assist come standard too. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The new 911 incorporates all of Porsche’s most advanced electronics. (Photo: Porsche)

Also standard, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) improves high-speed handling thanks to electronically variable dampers with both Normal and Sport settings, while Porsche Torque Vectoring, which comes standard with the pricier S and 4S, is now offered as optional equipment when ordering the new Carrera 4 Coupe and Cabriolet. 

Other features include the optional Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system, plus staggered front and rear 20- and 21-inch alloy rims, while staggered 19- and 20-inch alloy wheels come standard. 

As for exterior styling, you’ll have a difficult time trying to spot a Carrera 4 when it’s driving toward you, but you might catch its italicized “4” on the rear deck lid when it passes you by, or alternatively see if two rectangular tailpipes have replaced the base model’s twin oval tips. This isn’t an exact science, however, as it’s possible for Carrera 4 customers to purchase an available set of dual oval exhaust pipes, but take note if a quad of round ports are filling out the 911’s lower rear apron it’s a Carrera 2S or 4S. Got that? 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
These redesigned sport seats, standard with both Carrera 2 and Carrera 4 models, are classic Porsche designs. (Photo: Porsche)

This said nothing is so obviously unique inside either 911 Carrera 2 or 4. Both models arrive standard with the German brand’s almost entirely digital primary gauge cluster, with only its classic analogue tachometer at centre, while the new 10.9-inch Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen infotainment interface fills the top portion of the centre stack, featuring enhanced connectivity no less. Hardly last on an extensive list of standard features, both 911 Carreras feature the same reportedly comfortable and supportive redesigned seats. 

The fresh new 2020 Porsche Carrera 4 Coupé is now available to order from $111,900, plus freight and fees, as is the Carrera 4 Cabriolet, start at $126,000. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

The new Porsche Taycan is finally here and its top-line 750-hp Turbo S is awesome

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The 2020 Taycan Turbo S redefines electrified performance. (Photo: Porsche)

Not many cars have been as enthusiastically anticipated as the new Porsche Taycan, and now production model has finally arrived at the 2019 IAA in Frankfurt, Germany. 

To say that it’s powerful seems as bizarrely understated as merely calling it quick. Take a deep breath and then consider that its most formidable variant makes an outrageous 750 horsepower and even more mind-blowing 774 lb-ft of torque, its collective force allowing for a 2.8-second blast from zero to 100 km/h. 

Such performance is nothing new to Tesla aficionados, the California brand’s Model S P100D good for a 0 to 100 km/h run of only 2.6 seconds, but how it achieves that feat with just 613 horsepower and 686 lb-ft of torque available is beyond me (although the fact that its heaviest curb weight of 2,250 kg/4,960 lbs is lower than the Taycan’s 2,295-kg/5,059-lb unladen weight probably has something to do with it). Then again, Porsche has a tendency to understate performance specifications; this brewing up to be an epic drag race that every credible cable and YouTube automotive show will be covering. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The Taycan sports a stunning new design that will influence future Porsche models for years to come. (Photo: Porsche)

This said, Porsche’s faithful care more going fast around corners than merely burning up the asphalt in a straight line. To prove the Taycan’s dominance through tight twisting curves, Porsche took a pre-series example to the legendary Nürburgring-Nordschleife racetrack and quickly set an EV lap-record of 7:42 minutes, which just so happened to obliterate the last Tesla Model S P85D’s 8:50 lap time by over a minute. A minute off the pace around any racetrack is downright embarrassing, making us willing to bet that Tesla will soon show up in Nürburg, Rhineland-Palatinate with its more recently introduced P100D, plus a complete crew and an experienced driver. 

In Tesla’s corner is price, because any 2020 Taycan Turbo is much more expensive than even a fully featured Model S P100D. The 2020 Taycan Turbo, which makes 671 maximum horsepower in launch mode, 627 lb-ft of torque, and can achieve a 3.2-second run from zero to 100 km/h, is now ready to order for $173,900 plus freight, whereas the new top-tier Taycan Turbo S is available from $213,900. Making matters more interesting, these two models aren’t even fully loaded, with Porsche’s many pricey options capable of driving its price up and over $250,000, which is a range normally associated with Aston Martin Rapides, Bentley Flying Spurs and Rolls-Royce Ghosts (ok, maybe a used R-R). 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
While straight-line acceleration is important in this class, the Taycan’s forte is high-speed control around corners. (Photo: Porsche)

None of the super sedans above are capable of completing the 100-yard dash as quickly or scaling a mountain pass with the level of fleet finesse as a Taycan, however, while none will get the job done without chugging down a tanker’s full of premium unleaded gasoline. Back to electrics, a new 2019 Model S can be had for a comparatively bargain basement $108,990, while its sportier Performance trim line will set you back a mere $134,990 before creeping up to $155k when all options are added. Still, that seems like chump change next to a Taycan Turbo or Turbo S. 

If you’re starting to feel like Porsche has forgotten simpler folk that can barely afford anything into six figures, we can take a little comfort in knowing that these super-fast Turbo variants (in name only, as there are no turbos at play) are merely being introduced first for their jaw-dropping wow factor. Later this year additional less powerful trims will be added to bring the price down from their current cirrus-pheric levels to mere stratospheric realms, but the upcoming Cross Turismo crossover coupe, which will directly take on Jaguar’s I-Pace toward the end of 2020, will no doubt have a full range of more and less accessible window stickers. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The new Taycan’s interior looks very inviting. (Photo: Porsche)

While performance matters, styling will probably play a bigger role in consumer choices when opting for either the Taycan or Model S. The new Porsche is completely new and inarguably good looking, whereas the Model S has been in production for seven years with very few changes. Fit, finish and interior refinement isn’t exactly a Model S strong point either, but expect only the industry’s best materials and workmanship within the new Porsche, while Stuttgart’s various on-board electronic systems are as good as digital displays get. 

To that end the Taycan includes a fully digital pod-like gauge cluster that appears to float on its own behind the steering wheel. The black background of its classic Porsche curved oval area gets filled with colourful high-definition graphics that should appeal to both experienced EV users as well as long-time Porsche owners, while the two touchscreens that span the centre and right-side of the dash, the second display in front of the passenger, and the third capacitive touchscreen atop the sloped centre console (a la Range Rover), are digital eye candy and ideal for optimal control of the car’s myriad functions. 

One of those screens no doubt includes animated power-flow graphics that show a permanent-magnet synchronous motor powering each axle, combining for the previously noted output numbers depending on the model chosen, although it should be noted that both make 616 horsepower when not in launch mode. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The fully digital gauge cluster takes its overall oval shape from classic Porsche models. (Photo: Porsche)

With that overboost setting switched back on, the slower of the two Taycan models can launch from standstill to 200 km/h in a scant 10.6 seconds, while this car’s standing quarter mile arrives in just 11.1 seconds. Do the same with the more formidable Turbo S and the 200-km/h mark arrives in just 9.8 seconds, while the quarter mile zips past in only 10.8. Both trims top out at 280 km/h (161 mph), an electronically limited top speed. 

To achieve such performance the new Porsche incorporates some ultra-sophisticated tech, such as a single-speed front transmission and a larger two-speed rear gearbox. The latter transmission incorporates one gear for acceleration and another taller one for higher speed cruising. It chooses between rear gear sets automatically by monitoring a driver’s style, but it can also be done manually by selecting one of five drive modes. Just like it sounds, Range mode optimizes efficiency and therefore employs the taller second gear as often as possible while temporarily shutting down the front motor, whereas Normal mode makes the second gear the priority, yet uses the first gear a bit more. Sport mode, on the other hand, prioritizes first gear up to about 90 to 100 km/h, although it shifts to the second gear whenever throttle pressure is eased, and then goes back to first when needed. The Taycan also includes Sport Plus and Individual driving modes. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
Taycan infotainment is divided between three touchscreens, two across the top and one on the lower console. (Photo: Porsche)

Anyone who’s owned a Tesla knows about overheating, the Model S notorious for it, especially when trying to execute consecutive full-power standing starts. Rather than grandfather this problem onto new Taycan buyers, Porsche has designed cooler running electric motors that feature a special hairpin winding technique to the stators’ copper solenoid coils. The result is a copper fill factor of 70 percent compared to 45 percent when those coils are wound the traditional way, giving the Taycan better more reliable performance. 

In order to prove its point, Porsche endurance-tested the new Taycan in ultra-hot climates (of 42°C with a track temperature of nearly 54°C). A pre-production model circled Italy’s high-banked Nardò Ring oval racetrack at speeds ranging between 195 and 215 km/h for 24 hours straight, the marathon including six test drivers covering 3,425 km (2,128 m). Following up this punishing test program was another test that saw the new Porsche undergo 26 back-to-back launches from standstill to 200 km/h of less than 10 seconds each, with an average of 0.8 seconds variance between fastest and slowest acceleration times. Then we have the Nürburgring event noted earlier, with performance that should completely set the Taycan apart from the Model S. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The four-place interior appears plenty practical. (Photo: Porsche)

Below the floorboards of both Taycan Turbo models is a 93.4-kilowatt-hour high-voltage lithium-ion battery sourced from LG, with enough stored energy to drive for 381 to 450 km (237 to 280 miles) based on the European WLTP rating system. The more quicker Turbo S also offers more range, its expected distance from fully topped up to near empty being 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 miles). 

Making all this happen is an industry-first 800-volt electrical architecture, this also providing for faster recharging when an appropriate 270-kW charge station can be found (or installed in your home). How fast can it be refilled? How does five to 80 percent in just 22.5 minutes sound? Sure that’s a long wait for those used to filling up at a gas station, but anyone familiar with an electric car will know this is incredibly quick. 

Porsche’s Charging Planner makes the process of charging even easier, or at least can maximize one’s efficiency when traveling. For instance, when it charts a given route it factors in the best places to recharge along the way, even if it driving a bit farther out of the way for a quicker 270-kW charge station (which will save a lot of time over a regular 50-kW DC charger) is needed. What’s more, the Charging Planner will precondition the battery to 20°C for faster recharging. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
Its 800-volt architecture means a 270-kW charger can fill its battery from 5 to 80 percent in just 22.5 minutes. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the new 2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo and Turbo S are now available to build and order from Porsche Canada’s retail website, or you can place an order through your neighbourhood Porsche dealer, but you’ll want to act quickly if being amongst the first in your city to own one matters. This is the first electric car ever capable of truly taking on Tesla’s quickest Model S, making it about as important as any EV built within the last seven years. 

And while waiting to take delivery of your new Taycan, or simply hoping for those lottery ticket numbers to match the bouncing balls on TV, enjoy the complete album of gallery photos above and generous supply of Porsche-sourced videos below: 

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

World Premiere Porsche Taycan (40:33):

 

The new Porsche Taycan – Designed to enliven (1:28):

 

The fully electric Porsche Taycan accelerates 0-90-0 mph on the USS Hornet (0:59):

 

Onboard Lap – Porsche Taycan Sets a Record at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife (8:09):

 

New Porsche Taycan sets a record at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife (0:58):

 

Taycan Prototype Convinces at Endurance Run in Nardò (0:57):

 

The new electric Porsche Taycan proves its repeatability of power before upcoming World Premiere (1:05):

 

A thank you to electricity: The Porsche Taycan (0:45):

 

Porsche adds 670 hp plug-in hybrid drivetrain to 2020 Cayenne and Cayenne Coupe

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The new 670-hp Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid can sprint from 0-100km/h in just 3.6 seconds. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche introduced its completely redesigned third-generation Cayenne for model year 2018, and as is normally the case for the Stuttgart, Germany-headquartered luxury brand, has been continually expanding the mid-size crossover SUV line with new trim levels ever since. 

From the modest yet still energetic 335 horsepower base V6 up to the rip-roaring 541 horsepower Turbo, with the 434 horsepower Cayenne S and 455 net horsepower Cayenne E-Hybrid plug-in in between, the Cayenne portfolio is wide and diverse, but now, taking its cue from last year’s Panamera, Porsche is about to add a much more formidable 670 net horsepower (541 hp from the Internal Combustion Engine/ICE and 134 hp from the electric motor) Turbo S E-Hybrid model to its mid-size SUV lineup. 

The premium brand’s performance-tuned eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic gearbox comes as standard equipment, as does the Porsche Traction Management (PTM) active all-wheel drive system with an electronically variable, map-controlled multi-plate clutch, plus an automatic brake differential (ABD) and anti-slip regulation (ASR). 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
Both the conventional Cayenne and the new Cayenne Coupe can be had in Turbo S E-Hybrid trim. (Photo: Porsche)

The new plug-in hybrid powertrain will be the top-level trim on the regular Cayenne as well as the new Cayenne Coupe, the latter (in lesser trims) expected to arrive at Porsche Canada dealerships soon, and along with heaps of electrified and twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 horsepower it makes a shocking 663 lb-ft of combined torque (567 lb-ft from the ICE and 295 lb-ft from the electric motor), making the new model capable of blasting from zero to 100 km/h in just 3.8 seconds with its standard Sport Chrono Package, or 3.6 seconds with its available Lightweight Sport Package, all ahead of achieving a terminal velocity of 295 km/h (183.3 mph). 

Being that it’s a plug-in hybrid (PHEV), the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid’s completely charged 14.1 kWh battery is reportedly good for zero-local-emissions commutes and errand runs over short durations thanks to a maximum EV range of about 40 kilometres. The lithium-ion battery, which hides below the cargo compartment floor, takes a mere 6 hours to fully recharge when connected to a 230-volt Level 2 household charging station, but Porsche claims that a 400-volt supercharger is capable of reducing charge times to only 2.4 hours. 

Additionally, owners can download a smartphone app that can remotely monitor the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid’s charging process, plus the same app can pre-condition the auto climate control system and other features before the owner returns, similarly to how a remote engine start system can do likewise, but the Cayenne PHEV app only utilizes the battery for ancillary power, rather than the gasoline-portion of the SUV’s powertrain. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid needs just 2.4 hours to completely recharge on a 400-volt supercharger. (Photo: Porsche)

Those not yet familiar with Porsche’s all-new Cayenne Coupe should know that it gets a 20-millimetre roofline drop featuring a reworked front windshield framed within a shallower set of A pillars, plus much more tapered rear side windows, completely remoulded rear side doors, redesigned rear quarter panels, and a new rear bumper, with the latter composite panel also getting a new integrated license plate holder. This results in a small 19-mm (0.7-inch) increase to overall width, which when combined together with its just-noted lower ride height makes for an even more aggressive stance than the regular Cayenne. 

A few more Cayenne Coupe improvements include a special adaptive rear spoiler, individual rear bucket-style sport seats divided by a shallow centre console storage bin, and a standard 2.16-cubic-metre fixed glass panoramic moonroof that can be cloaked from sunlight by an integrated roller-type shade, or optionally the roof panel can be made from lightweight carbon-fibre. 

The all-new 2020 Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid, which is available to order now with deliveries expected early next year, will set you back another $40,400 over the already pricey 2019 Cayenne Turbo, at $182,200 plus freight and fees, this more than twice the price of a base 2019 Cayenne that’s available from only $76,700. As for the new Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe, its $187,100 retail price is $39,100 loftier than the 2019 Cayenne Turbo Coupe, and likewise is more than double that of the $86,400 base Cayenne Coupe. Interestingly, both Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid and Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe perform identically.  

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The new Cayenne’s interior is beautifully crafted from some of the industry’s best materials. (Photo: Porsche)

Incidentally, you can find detailed 2020 Porsche Cayenne pricing right here on CarCostCanada, including its various trims, packages and individual options, plus you can also save big by learning about available rebates and even source dealer invoice pricing that could keep thousands more in your wallet. 

If you want to get your hands on either new Porsche model, make sure to contact your local dealer as quickly as possible, and while you’re waiting make sure to enjoy the sole video the German automaker provided below. 

 

The new Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé: A master of balance (1:00):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
The new 2nd-generation Panamera is arguably a more attractive design than the original. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Porsche’s Panamera is a sport sedan like no other. Certainly there are a number of low-slung four-door coupes within the premium sector, but the Panamera is longer, wider and lower than most, and looks as close to the iconic 911 Carrera than any other car on the road. 

The four-door coupe category is still relatively new, but it’s expanding while other segments are contracting. Mercedes-Benz created this segment along with the CLS-Class 15 years ago, five years before the Panamera became its first competitor in 2009. Audi’s A7 and Aston Martin’s Rapide quickly followed in 2010, a fair bit before BMW showed up in 2012 with its 6 Series Gran Coupe. Perfectly timed with the latter Bavarian model’s cancellation and the new 2020 8 Series Gran Coupe’s arrival, Mercedes will soon deliver a four-door coupe triple threat thanks to the all-new higher-priced (and clearly named) GT 4-Door Coupe, which will soon join the recently updated second-generation CLA-Class and third-gen CLS, so it’s not as if growth in this category is slowing, or at least sales aren’t falling off as quickly as they are amongst more traditional luxury sedans. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
The Panamera is the sportiest of four-door coupes currently available, and beautifully proportioned front to back. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Some notable four-door coupe mentions at higher and lower levels of the auto market include the limited production (120 units) Aston Martin Rapide-based 2015 to 2016 Lagonda Taraf, which was gorgeous to my eyes at least, but priced at a stratospherically $1 million-plus, while possibly more interesting has been the success of smaller entries, including the just-noted Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class, the BMW 4 Series Gran Coupe, and the Audi A5 Sportback, which have pulled this rakish body type down-market nearly as far as the Volkswagen Arteon (previously the CC) and Kia Stinger. 

Returning to the loftier price bracket, Lamborghini has been teasing us with a potential production model along the lines of the beautiful 2008 Estoque concept for more than a decade (I think it would’ve been a strong seller), while Bentley hasn’t stopped talking up the possibility of an even sleeker sport sedan. Otherworldly to some, these two models could actually be sensible business cases due to their Volkswagen group ownership and familial connection to this very Panamera. Bentley, for one, already uses the same VW AG-created MSB architecture found under this Panamera for its new Continental GT coupe and convertible plus its Flying Spur sedan, a version of which could also be modified to work with a future Estoque. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
Everything but the glossy black trim and the 21-inch alloys are standard Panamera 4S fare. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s not like this would be an unusual move, with the Bentley Bentayga and Lamborghini Urus sharing underpinnings with the Porsche Cayenne and new Cayenne Coupe respectively, not to mention the Audi Q7, Q8 and new global market Volkswagen Touareg (that we no longer get here), but as exciting as it might be for these exotic players to dip their toes in the four-door coupe waters, buyers who want to spend $300,000-plus in this class, yet still requiring a reliable option, have no other choice but a loaded up Panamera. 

And yes, if you check off every 2019 Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Executive box on Porsche’s online configurator you’ll be paying north of $320k, which will provide you with an optional exclusive colour, the car’s largest set of 21-inch alloys coated in the same exclusive paint choice, an upgraded interior with the highest quality of leathers covering almost every possible surface that’s not already trimmed in hardwood or carbon-fibre, plus all available technologies. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
Get ready to be impressed with the Panamera’s beautifully finished interior. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid was new for 2018, and thanks to Porsche I was able to drive it along with a number of other new and updated models last year. The version I tested featured the regular sloped trunk lid and normal non-extended wheelbase, and it was mind-blowingly fast thanks to 680 net horsepower. I also tested last year’s entirely new Sport Turismo wagon, that I happen to like best, although that car’s drivetrain was identical to the Panamera 4S shown right here in this review, and therefore made 440-horsepower from a 2.9-litre twin-turbo V6. 

Bringing all things Panamera up to 2019 speed, no changes have been made to any of the models mentioned in this review so far, other than minor increases to pricing across the line, the car on this page precisely as it was for the 2017 model year when the second-generation Panamera was introduced. This said 2019 hasn’t been without improvements to the Panamera line, thanks to the addition of a 453-horsepower twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8-powered GTS model that now slots between this 4S and the Panamera Turbo in both performance and price. The car I’m reviewing here starts at $119,600, by the way, while the new GTS can be had for $147,400, and the Turbo for $174,200. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
Sitting in the driver’s seat feels like a roomy sports car. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

No GTS was available at the time of testing, unfortunately, but I was truly okay having another stint in a 4S. It makes 110 more horsepower than the 330-horsepower base Panamera after all, and uses all four wheels for added grip. The snarling exhaust note is fabulous in Sport mode, crackling and popping when lifting off the throttle, but rest assured that the fiercer Hyde side of its personality becomes a docile Jekyll when the drive mode selector is moved over to its default setting. 

The Panamera’s ideal balance between opulent luxury and outrageous performance is its best asset. No other four-door combines its level of sports car-like agility with such impressively detailed interior finishings. Its low-slung bodywork bucks against today’s taller SUV trend; Porsche providing its Macan and Cayenne for folks who want go-fast performance with a better view of the road. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
It looks like a traditional Porsche gauge cluster, but it’s mostly digital. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Panamera manoeuvres through serpentine corners like nothing so sizeable has ever been able to before, yet its ride is impressively smooth. Whether enduring inner-city laneways, overcoming inadequately paved railroad crossings and aging bridge expansion joints, or coursing down a circuitous backcountry road inundated with broken asphalt, the Panamera offers ample suspension travel for dealing with the worst bumps and potholes without becoming unsettled. Its compliance and/or firmness depends on the trim and wheel options chosen, of course, but I’ve driven every grade on offer other than the new GTS, and all provide track-worthy performance with comfort levels that I’d be more than satisfied to live with for all regular commutes and errand runs, let alone weekend getaways. 

My test car’s optional Satin Platinum finished 21-inch alloy wheels on 275/35 front and 315/30 rear Pirelli Cinturato P7 performance tires are the biggest available, so it wasn’t like I was cossetted with the base 4S model’s 19s, which are identical to the most entry-level of Panamera’s 265/45 front and 295/40 rear ZRs, by the way, a car that can be had for only $99,300 plus freight and fees. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
The right side of the gauge cluster can be used for route guidance. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

That base Panamera in mind, it’s hardly a slouch thanks to a 5.7-second launch from zero to 100km/h, or 5.5 seconds with its available Sport Chrono Package, whereas my 4S tester can do the deed in a mere 4.4 seconds in standard trim or 4.2 seconds with its Sport Chrono Package. The 4S also blasts past 160km/h in only 10.3 seconds, slicing 3.3 seconds off of the base trim’s zero to 160km/h time, all ahead of a terminal velocity of 289km/h, a stunning 25km/h faster on the track than the most basic Panamera. 

As phenomenally fun as all this high-speed action sounds, there are plenty of quicker Panameras available. The new GTS, for instance, can hit 100km/h from standstill in only 4.1 seconds, while the Turbo blasts past the mark in a scant 3.8 seconds, and finally the sensational Turbo S E-Hybrid needs just 3.4 seconds to charge past 100km/h. Top speeds increase similarly, with the Turbo S E-Hybrid capable of a lofty 310 km/h, but when compared to the majority of sport sedans even this Panamera 4S performs better. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
Check out the stunning graphics. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Its new eight-speed twin-clutch PDK transmission delivers fast, smooth, paddle-activated shifts, and torque-vectoring all-wheel drive maintains the chassis’ awesome adhesion to tarmac no matter the weather or road conditions, while I must also say it looks just as eye-arresting when blurring past at high speed as it does when cruising around town. 

As mentioned earlier, glossy black exterior trim isn’t standard, but nevertheless my test car’s darkened accents were an attractive contrast against its white paint. Normally the Panamera gets satin silver and/or bright metal detailing, but on the other hand you can also have the mirror caps, door handles, badges, etcetera painted in gloss black. 

This said the possibilities are almost limitless inside, but each Panamera’s incredibly fine attention to detail is what makes its interior stand out above many peers, such as all of the industry’s best composites and leathers, available hardwoods, aluminum or carbon-fibre inlays, plus digital interfaces that are so brilliantly high in definition that it seems like you can dip your fingers right into the depths of their fabulously rich contrasted displays and graphically illustrated imagery. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
The front seats are ideally comfortable and supportive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Yes, the Panamera provides some of the best digital displays available, whether ogling the classic Porsche-style five-dial instrument cluster, its centre ring being the only analogue component in an otherwise wonderfully colourful arrangement of screens, the one on the left for driving-related info and the right-side monitor incorporating a comprehensive multi-information display including mapping for the route guidance system. 

Alternatively you can choose to view that map over on the long, horizontal infotainment display atop the centre stack, which looks nearly three-dimensional when doing so. All the usual touchscreen gesture controls make this as simple to use as a smartphone or tablet, and speaking of your phone it also syncs with Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, while providing all of the types of functions expected in this class including an as-tested surround camera system that, together with audible and visual front and rear sonar, makes parking a lot easier. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
A dual-pane panoramic sunroof sheds light on the beautifully finished cabin. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The majority of controls on the raked centre console are touch-sensitive, needing only a slight push and click to engage. All the buttons, knobs and switches feel very high in quality too, the Panamera’s interior second to none for quality construction. The console’s surrounding surface treatment is glossy black, but nevertheless it’s quite easy to keep clean due to a glass-like smartphone material, although the piano black lacquered detailing found elsewhere in my tester’s cabin, particularly a section on the ashtray at the very base of that centre console, was always covered in grime, dust, etcetera. On the positive you don’t have to opt for piano black, but can choose one of many options that will keep the cabin looking tidier even when dirty, although it should be said there’s absolutely nothing wrong with being able to see what needs cleaning for the sake of sanitation. 

Fortunately the leather-clad sport steering wheel, where my hands were most of the time, had no such yucky buildup of filth. Instead, I was greeted to one of the best of its type in the industry. Its narrow spokes are elegant, hollowed out at centre for an even lighter, more performance-oriented appearance, while its integrated buttons and scrolling knurled-metal dials are well crafted with especially tight fitment and good damping. As per usual, the button for the heatable rim is hidden within the base of the lowest spoke, an intelligent design for sure, but some may find it too easy to turn on or off when spinning the wheel. I like that it automatically turns on when starting the car, or likewise stays off, depending on the way you’ve set it up. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
The rear seating area is spacious enough for most body types. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Features in mind, my test car came stocked up with three-way heated and ventilated front seats, plus a superb optional 710-watt 15-speaker Bose Centerpoint 14-channel surround sound stereo upgrade, which should only be shown the door if going for the 1,455-watt 22-speaker Burmester 3D High-End Surround system (I’ve tested this top-line system before and it’s amazing). As good as the audio performance was, my tester didn’t include the previously noted Sport Chrono Package, so it was 0.2 seconds slower off the line (not that I could notice), and the clock on top of the dash only featured an attractive looking black dial with white numerals and indices, instead of the upgraded chronometer version with both analogue and digital readouts. 

Still, due to including an available full rear console incorporating a large high-definition touchscreen, three-way heatable seat switches, twin rear auto climate controls resulting in a four-way auto HVAC system front to rear, powered side and rear window sunshades, plus a large two-pane panoramic moonroof above, not to mention the Panamera’s usual set of ideally shaped sport bucket rear seats that are as comfortable and supportive as those up front, I might have been just as happy being chauffeured as I was driving, but as life has it I didn’t have the means (or an available friend) to do the driving, so I simply enjoyed my nice quiet rest in the back seat while taking notes. 

2019 Porsche Panamera 4S Road Test
Got stuff? The Panamera can haul a reasonable amount of life’s gear. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be clear, the second-gen Panamera is now so excellent in every way that it’s near impossible to find much to complain about. Of course there’s not as much room in the rear as a 7 Series or S-Class, but providing limousine levels of roominess is hardly the Panamera’s purpose. Truth be told, no matter the model tested I have never been uncomfortable in back, and let’s not forget that Porsche would be more than happy to provide you with a longer-wheelbase Executive body style if driving around larger passengers is part of your routine, which means that you won’t have to say goodbye to beautiful design and sensational performance just to maintain a practical lifestyle. 

And that’s the gist of the Panamera. Thanks to its wide variety of trims, packages and options, all of which are viewable right here on CarCostCanada, where you can also learn about manufacturer rebates and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands, this four-door Porsche provides something for almost every sport/luxury car shopper. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

New Porsche Taycan EV on three-continent Shanghai, Goodwood and NYC tour

2020 Porsche Taycan
Porsche has taken its new Taycan EV on a three-continent tour, starting at its Experience Centre in Shanghai. (Photo: Porsche)

Fans of electric vehicles have been over the moon about the soon to arrive 2020 Taycan, and now that Porsche has a pre-production model strutting its stuff on a global tour, we’re all getting a taste of what’s to come. 

The sleek four-door coupe-style Taycan is currently on a “Triple Demo Run” that started off on the first week of July on the Porsche Experience Centre (PEC) handling track in Shanghai, China, where Porsche Carrera Cup Asia driver Li Chao coaxed it around 1.4 kilometres of high-speed curves. This particular Taycan was closest to a street-ready production model anyone outside of Porsche’s inner circle has seen yet, the black-painted model adorned with a stunning red dragon graphic upon its roof. 

“The exceptional performance typical for Porsche was a clear development objective for the Taycan. You can sense that right from the start,” an enthusiastic Chao, who was especially impressed by the Taycan’s handling, stated after his initial run. “From uncompromisingly sporty to surprisingly comfortable, the chassis of the new Taycan covers a wide range and successfully combines the precise handling of a sports car and the long-distance comfort of a saloon. In addition to its low centre of gravity, the rear-axle steering also plays a crucial role. The Taycan steers into corners very directly and has plenty of grip.” 

2020 Porsche Taycan
Porsche Carrera Cup Asia driver Li Chao was at the Taycan’s wheel for the event in China. (Photo: Porsche)

The new Taycan houses a quick-charging 800-volt architecture plus a 90-kWh lithium-ion battery, resulting in 592 horsepower (600 PS). The new Porsche catapults from 0 to 100km/h in less than 3.5 seconds, continues on to 200 km/h in under 12 seconds, and tops out above 250 km/h, making it one of the fastest four-door production sedans ever made. 

Continuing on its worldwide journey, the new Taycan silently sped up the popular “Hill Run” at the famed West Sussex, England-based Goodwood Estate that hosts the Goodwood Festival of Speed each year. Tasked with driving duties, multiple racing-winning Formula 1 veteran and LMP1/Porsche 919 Hybrid World Endurance Championship (WEC) contender Mark Webber, showed just how awesomely quick the new Porsche can be (make sure to watch the videos below for more).  

“The Taycan’s power delivery is awesome,” said Webber. “I took part in this event in a Porsche 911 GT2 RS two years ago, so I already knew that it all comes down to power and traction. But, even for a thoroughbred racing driver like me, it is amazing how the Taycan – even though it’s still a prototype – accelerates off the start and out of the corners.” 

2020 Porsche Taycan
The start of the Goodwood Festival of Speed “Hill Run” with F1 race-winning driver Mark Webber at the wheel. (Photo: Porsche)

Next on the agenda is a New York City stint as part of the ABB FIA Formula E Championship season finale, a fitting event for an electric super sedan. This final demo run will see Formula E driver and 2016 24 Hours of Le Mans winner (while driving a WEC Porsche LMP1 car no less) Neel Jani at the wheel, so be sure to watch all the action on your favourite video streaming site. 

While all this ultra-fast electrification is fun for auto enthusiasts everywhere, and mostly seen as a positive for the green movement, no one can say for sure how the Taycan will measure up to its most obvious EV rival when it comes to sales success. The now somewhat long-in-tooth Tesla Model S had led all battery-powered competitors on the sales charts up to the point its own Tesla Model 3 sibling arrived on the scene, so the question now remains whether the Taycan can truly pose a threat to the Model S, or will remain as a niche player like all non-Tesla EV entries so far. 

Let’s face it. Tesla virtually owns the electrified sport-luxury market. The Model S, which arrived in 2012, not only outsells all other electric competitors in its mid-size E-segment, but actually outperforms every conventionally powered mid-size luxury model other than the BMW 5 Series and top-selling Mercedes-Benz E-Class. This said, Model S deliveries fell 6.3 percent in 2018, and a much more sizeable 56 percent during the first three months of this year, but this may have more to do with its four-door sedan body style than any lack of interest in the Tesla brand, because both the E-Class and 5 Series found themselves in the same downward spiral, with Audi’s recently redesigned A6 and A7, plus Porsche’s Panamera bucking the trend. Still, despite its downturn, the Model S managed to hang onto third place in the mid-size E-segment. 

2020 Porsche Taycan
At less than 3.5 seconds from standstill to 100km/h, the Taycan is blisteringly quick. (Photo: Porsche)

The Panamera grew by 40.1 percent in calendar year 2018, and didn’t lose much of that market share during Q1 of 2019 either after experiencing a small loss of 0.8 percent. Tesla’s Model S, however, outpaced the Panamera by a near three-to-one ratio last year, and 2.5-to-one over the initial three months of 2019, but it’s nevertheless safe say the recent sales strength of both premium cars is a good sign for potential future success of the new Taycan. 

The Panamera, which available with various conventional engines plus two electrified hybrid powertrains, is very close in size to the Model S, at least before taking overall length into account. So far Porsche hasn’t released official Taycan dimensions, but if the production model ends up being close to in size to the Mission E concept it will be slightly shorter, albeit quite a bit wider and significantly lower than either the Panamera or Model S, but it will still fit ideally within the mid-size E-segment. 

This brings us to a question: As impressive as the new Taycan appears to be, can the upstart Porsche EV punt the longstanding Tesla titleholder off the top sales-leadership podium? That Jaguar has had difficulty attracting EV customers to its new I-Pace, despite that model being a crossover utility and therefore more in line with current automotive trends, actually makes sense because the British luxury brand already has major problems finding buyers for its conventionally powered models, but Audi, amongst the auto industry’s hotter luxury brands, recently introduced the all-electric E-Tron, a crossover that’s even more traditionally SUV-like, and it hasn’t made much of a dent into Tesla Model X territory either. 

2020 Porsche Taycan
“It is amazing how the Taycan – even though it’s still a prototype – accelerates off the start and out of the corners,” said ex-F1 star Mark Webber. (Photo: Porsche)

To bring you up to date on U.S. EV market growth, June saw increased sector sales of 120 percent, but take note that most of the 29,632 deliveries were attributed to Tesla, its 23,914-unit total accounting for 83 percent of market share growth due to 20,550 Model 3 (a compact luxury D-segment four-door sedan) buyers, 2,725 Model X (a mid-size luxury crossover SUV) customers, and new 1,750 Model S owners. Tesla aside, EV sales from other brands increased by 30 percent in June, which is excellent, but of course this number was comparatively small at 4,718 units total. 

As anyone can surmise, earning a profit while selling in small numbers is not going to happen, with the next best-selling Nissan Leaf only able to deliver 1,156 units, Chevy’ impressive Bolt only finding 1,190 buyers (its worst YTD result), Honda positively surprising all with 1,092 Clarity FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle) deliveries, Audi’s aforementioned E-Tron sales actually dropping from 856 units in May to 726 (after 253 down the road during its first month of April), BMW’s i3 having its best month so far this year with 473 sales, Jaguar’s new I-Pace managing its second-best month with 236 deliveries, Toyota pushing 166 Mirai FCVs out the door, Hyundai’s Kona EV finding 127 new owners, and other EV models like Kia’s Soul EV, Volkswagen’s E-Golf, etcetera not being accounted for due to having their sales numbers combined with conventionally models bearing the same nameplate. 

Just which list the new Porsche Taycan gets added to, either alongside Tesla’s strong sales or somewhere mixed in with all other EV makers, is unknown for now, but we only have to wait until later this year to find out. Until the new production Taycan gets officially revealed in September and then arrives in Porsche dealerships later this year, makes sure to enjoy our photo gallery above and collection of videos below. 

 

Kicking off in China: the Porsche Taycan prototype visits Shanghai (1:00):

Porsche Taycan prototype visits Goodwood Festival of Speed 2019 (1:41):

Hey Porsche, watch this video. Love, Electricity (1:03):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 now available to order

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Thanks to 414-hp and plenty of performance upgrades the new 2020 718 Cayman GT4 is the most capable of its kind yet. (Photo: Porsche)

Decades ago Porsche was criticized for not making entry-level models that measured up to the much mightier 911, examples being the now 50-year-old ‘69-‘76 mid-engine 914 and ‘76–‘88 front-engine 924, but since the mid-engine Boxster convertible and Cayman coupe arrived on the scene, complainants haven’t been anywhere near as vocal. 

Just the same, the brand’s new line of turbocharged flat-four powerplants that arrived in the current fourth-gen 718 series models have had their share of naysayers, yet while these engines’ barks aren’t quite as vicious sounding as the flat-six 911’s meatier growl, the 2.5-litre mill’s bite has kept most critics silent, particularly when tuned to GTS heights. 

With respect to the 986, 987, 981 and today’s 982 platform architectures, the Cayman and Boxster were near perfect performers from the very beginning thanks to their relatively light curb weights and inherently well-balanced mid-engine layouts, and every generation became even better at managing high-speed road and racetrack performance. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
Choose the 718 Spyder if going topless in the quickest and most stylish Boxster ever is more to your liking. (Photo: Porsche)

As with the previous-gen Boxster and Cayman, the 718 series’ many more fans should also be happy to know that 2020 models are about to be built in their most formidable production trims yet, the upcoming 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4 even capable of sprinting away from and outmaneuvering some 911 models. 

To fill you in on some background information, the 718 Cayman (currently on sale from $63,700), can be had in base 300-horsepower Cayman trim that’s capable of zero to 100km/h in just 5.1 seconds, or 4.9 seconds when hooked up to its optional paddle shift-operated dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission, or a speedy 4.7 seconds with the PDK and the car’s available Sport Chrono Package, while if you keep its right pedal planted it can hit a top track speed of 275 km/h. 

The entry-level coupe can also be upgraded to 350-horsepower Cayman S trim ($78,600), which can spirit away from standstill to 100km/h in only 4.6, 4.4 and 4.2 seconds respectively, plus it tops out at an even higher 285 km/h, while lastly the 365-horsepower Cayman GTS ($92,600) is capable of running from 0 to 100km/h in 4.6, 4.3 and 4.1 seconds respectively, while it claims a top speed of 290 km/h. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
The 718 Cayman GT4 has a massive rear wing. (Photo: Porsche)

The just-noted 718 Cayman GT4 arrives at the top of this pecking order, just like the previous version did when introduced in 2015. Where the old Cayenne (and Boxster) had flat-six engines throughout its range, the new GT4 replaces the 718’s 2.0- and 2.5-litre turbocharged flat-four engines with a downgraded (but still amazing) version of the wonderfully high-revving naturally-aspirated 4.0-litre H-6 from the 911 GT3, producing a generous 414-horsepower and 309 lb-ft of torque, which is a 29-hp bump over the previous GT4 due in part to a sonorous 8,000-rpm redline, while it’s solely conjoined to a six-speed manual transmission just like the 911 GT3, all combining for a zero to 100km/h sprint time of 4.4 seconds, plus a terminal velocity of 304 km/h. 

As for the 718 Spyder, which also updates a previous 2016 model, it shares all of the same mechanical bits as the Cayman GT4. This means it’s 39 hp more potent than the outgoing Spyder, resulting in the same 4.4-second 100-km/h sprint time as the Cayman GT4, although its top speed is fractionally lower at 301 km/h. Unlike the GT4, mind you, the open-top Spyder is quite different than the model using the Boxster nameplate, despite housed in its basic tub. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
The 718 Spyder gets two “streamliners” on its backside as well as an auto-deploying spoiler. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the two new cars’ utilize a six-speed manual gearbox, which isn’t all that unusual in the class, but interestingly this transmission includes downshift rev-matching, or rather what Porsche refers to as an “Auto Blip” function, which automatically matches a given cog to engine speed when dropping a gear. Fortunately, Porsche makes this feature optional, in that a driver can individually activate or defeat it via a button. Also standard, both new models feature a totally new and exclusively designed sport exhaust system that works its way around the cars’ complex rear diffusers while making the most of the “exciting flat-six sound of the engine,” noted Porsche in its press release. 

With respect to the two models’ outward designs, some key elements of the 718 Spyder appear like they were pulled from the 918 Spyder, not to mention the more recently introduced 911 Speedster. The 918 may have helped to inspire the 718 Spyder’s lower front fascia and similar, albeit much more pronounced, double-hump rear deck lid buttresses, while the new 911 Speedster may have influenced the 718 Spyder’s aggressive frontal treatment and double-bubble rear deck “streamliners”, as well as the new convertible’s vented hood, the “Spyder” lettering on its shortened B-pillars (which read “Speedster” on the 911), the similarly sculpted automatically-deploying rear spoiler, and the working rear diffuser. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Aerodynamics play a key role with both new 718 cars. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 718 Cayman GT4, on the other hand, pulls forward a number of similar styling cues and aero details from its 2016 predecessor, including the aggressively shaped front fascia, the horizontal black strip of hood venting, the large fixed rear wing, the wind-cheating rear diffuser, and the uniquely designed alloys, all developed with a focus on minimizing weight and maximizing downforce. The fact Porsche even painted both GT4 launch cars in a seemingly identical yellow hue is no coincidence either, just like they once again coated the latest 718 Spyder launch model in white. 

With an eye looking back to aerodynamics, each and every 718 Cayman GT4 exterior upgrade combines for 50 percent greater downforce with no negative affects on drag. Most of the aero advantages can be attributed to the new diffuser and rear wing elements, the latter feature good for 20-percent greater aero-efficiency than the outgoing GT4 wing. At the other end of the car, a deep lip spoiler joins up with air curtains to each side, this helping to channel air around the front wheels. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
Both models get unique interior trims, including plenty of soft Alcantara psuede. (Photo: Porsche)

Now with our focus on the 718 Spyder’s aero upgrades, its adaptive rear wing automatically powers upwards at 120 km/h, but unlike the conventional 718 Boxster’s retractable fabric roof, the Spyder’s top doesn’t benefit from electrical assistance, but instead requires manual removal and stowage below the rear deck cover. When replaced on top of the passenger compartment, Porsche promises a roof that can manage the Spyder’s high top speed without issue, providing full protection from wind, rain and more. 

Behind the scenes, both new models integrate a lightweight, high-performance chassis design that’s capable of keeping the engine and aero capabilities in check. Porsche leaned on its extensive motorsport heritage in order to achieve an ideal balance for the new Spyder and GT4, choosing to equip both with a model-exclusive rear axle, and a front axle adopted from the 2018 911 GT3. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Form-fitting sport seats come standard. (Photo: Porsche)

Additional standard features include Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), providing a 30-millimetre ride-height reduction when compared to regular 718 models, this lowering the new models’ centre of gravity, thus improving overall handling. Still, owners have the ability to manually adjust the suspensions’ camber, toe, ride-height and anti-roll bar settings, important for those who regularly hone their skills on the track. 

The now legendary 911 GT3 also provided the two new models’ braking setup, including their larger 380-mm cast iron rotors and fixed aluminum calipers, while buyers of either car can choose to upgrade to a set of ceramic composite brakes if desired, these 50-percent lighter and featuring discs that measure 410 mm up front and 390 mm in the rear. Additionally, the 718 Spyder and Cayman GT4 feature specially tuned ABS, electronic stability control (ESC) and traction control (TC) systems that enhance the cars’ performance, with these ESC and TC systems capable of being switched off via a two-stage process. 

Yet more upgrades include a standard mechanical limited-slip differential with Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), plus unique 20-inch alloy rims shod with 245/35ZR20 front and 295/30ZR20 rear UHP rubber. 

2020 Porsche 718 Spyder
The 414-hp flat-six gets an exclusive sport exhaust system. (Photo: Porsche)

As you may have noticed, the many performance upgrades mentioned up to this point don’t necessarily make the new 718 Spyder or 718 Cayman GT4 quicker off the line than GTS versions of either model, but both are faster on the track, and therefore should be better for everyday driving, at least when pushing the limits. With respect to racetrack limits, Porsche claims its new 718 Cayman GT4 is capable of lapping the Nürburgring Nordschleife “more than ten seconds faster than its predecessor.” 

Making the two new models more enjoyable to live with are upgraded interiors that include a special 360-mm GT Sport steering wheel with a cool yellow top-centre “marker” in Cayman GT4 trim. Additionally, both 718 Spyder and Cayman GT4 receive a 20-mm shorter shift lever that provides a “more direct and crisp feel” when changing gears. What’s more, a new Sport Seats Plus package comes standard, boasting seats with larger side bolsters to enhance lateral support, plus suede-like Alcantara inserts to improve backside grip. Alcantara also gets applied to a lower portion of the instrument panel, as well as the shift knob and boot, and the previously mentioned steering wheel rim. 

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
Porsche offers plenty of upgrades, including multi-colour interior accents. (Photo: Porsche)

On top of this, some cabin accents include body-colour trim for the 718 Spyder, and brushed aluminum details for the 718 Cayman GT4, while Porsche offers plenty of available décor upgrades as well. What’s more, you can opt for a set of full bucket seats or an 18-way power-adjustable Adaptive Sport Seats Plus package, but take note you won’t be required to pay more for air conditioning or the brand’s newest Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system that also features Sound Package Plus. This said, a navigation system and Porsche Connect, featuring Apple CarPlay, are optional. 

Also noteworthy, the 718 Spyder can be ordered with a Spyder Classic Interior Package that includes two-tone Bordeaux Red and Black leather upholstery, extended Alcantara, GT silver metallic interior trim, and a two-tone black and red fabric top, the latter “reminiscent of historic Porsche racing cars” says Porsche. Alternatively, red, silver, or yellow contrast stitching is available. 

However you’d like to order yours, I wouldn’t recommend waiting too long as Canada’s allotment will soon be spoken for. They’re currently available to order, with pricing beginning at $110,500 for the 718 Spyder, and $113,800 for the 718 Cayman GT4, plus a freight charge and other fees of course. 

While you’re waiting for your new 2020 718 Spyder or 718 Cayman GT4 to arrive, make sure to check out all the videos Porsche provided below: 

The new Porsche 718 Spyder. Perfectly irrational. (1:03):

The new Porsche 718 Spyder. Product highlights. (2:25):

The new Porsche 718 Cayman GT4. Product highlights. (2:13):

The new Porsche 718 GT4. Perfectly irrational. (1:01):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

New 911 Speedster pays tribute to Porsche’s storied motorsport past

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The new 911 Speedster has a very unique look from up front. (Photo: Porsche)

Last year, Porsche celebrated its 70th anniversary by producing the one-off 911 Speedster Concept, a beautiful modernization of its first-ever model, the 356 ‘No. 1’ Roadster from 1948. This sent the motoring press and many fans of the brand into an uproar about future production, resulting in the 2019 911 Speedster seen here. 

The Speedster is now available to order from you local Porsche retailer for just $312,500, a mere $149,200 more than the 911 GT3 Coupe that it’s based on. And yes, that means the all-new Speedster rides on outgoing 991 hardware, not the upcoming 2020 911 (992) that’s been top of the news headlines lately. 

We’re guessing the exclusive club of 1,948 buyers receiving their limited edition Speedsters toward the end of 2019 won’t care one whit about which chassis it rides on, chiefly because the Speedster is gorgeous and 991 underpinnings have been arguably Porsche’s best yet, at least when uprated to GT3 or GT2 guise. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The 911 Speedster’s rear design is even more distinct, the model shown here with its special Heritage Package. (Photo: Porsche)

Also notable, the renewed GT3 Coupe won’t arrive in 992 form for quite some time, and therefore the only way you’re going to get your hands on a 500-plus horsepower 4.0-litre flat-six crammed aft of the rear axle, capable of a screaming 9,000-rpm redline and generous 346 lb-ft of torque, is to opt for a current GT3 or choose the instantly collectable 911 Speedster, the newer model in fact good for a minor increase to 502 horsepower thanks to throttle bodies added from the GT3 R race car. 

The results of all this go-fast tech is a 4.0-second run from zero to 100km/h, which is just 0.1 seconds off the GT3’s pace, while its terminal velocity is 310 km/h, a mere 10 km/h slower than the GT3, despite not having its massive rear wing. 

What’s more, when you factor in that the Speedster only provides Porsche’s GT Sport six-speed manual transmission, which is also pulled from the GT3 and shaves four kilos from the seven-speed manual used for the regular 911, that standstill sprint to 100km/h score is even more amazing, because Porsche’s paddle shift-actuated dual-clutch PDK automated transmission is always quicker. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The Speedster includes a six-speed manual gearbox from the GT3. (Photo: Porsche)

Together with the GT3 powertrain, which comes with dynamic engine mounts from the GT3 by the way, the Speedster utilizes the supercar-beating model’s uprated chassis that incorporates a uniquely calibrated rear axle steering system, although this is where similarities between the two Porsche models end, because body mods are so significant that it’s hard to tell whether the two cars have much of anything in common. These include lower cut front and side windows, twin “streamliners” shaped from carbon fibre on the rear deck, these completely consuming the rear seating area, carbon fibre composite front fenders and hood, front and rear fascias formed from polyurethane, plus a lightweight manual fabric top. 

It was smart for Porsche to upgrade the roof for easier day-to-day usability, as the concept only featured a button-down tonneau cover that would’ve caused nothing but aggravation to its potential owners, while the automaker also deleted the “X” markings on the headlamp lenses that stylistically reminded history buffs about the tape once used to make sure broken glass didn’t end up on the racetrack to puncture tires; the removal of the 1950s-type aluminum fuel filler cap on the concept’s hood for fast refueling of the gas tank below; plus replacement of the Talbot mirror housings that were popular back when the 356 was around, to stock side mirrors. 

Fans of that now highly collectible classic 356 will no doubt be happy that Porsche left the gold-coloured “Speedster” lettering on the thick B-pillars and rear engine cover unmolested, but this said you’ll need to add a special upgrade package (see below) to get them. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
The regular Speedster gets a modern look… (Photo: Porsche)

All the carbon fibre mentioned earlier should make it clear that Porsche wanted its Speedster to be as light as possible, with the premium brand even going so far as to delete the stereo and air conditioning in base trim (they’re optional), but with a focus on performance they added a standard set of beefed up, lighter weight carbon ceramic brakes, boasting bright yellow six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers in the front and four-piston aluminium monobloc fixed calipers at back, these slicing a whopping 50 percent of weight from the regular 911’s cast iron rotors. Ringing those brakes are centre-lock Satin Black-painted 20-inch alloy wheels on Ultra High Performance (UHP) tires, aiding grip even further. 

Looking inside, the Speedster includes lighter weight door panels with storage nets and door pulls, plus the standard black leather can be improved with red stitching on the instrument panel and headrests with embroidered “Speedster” lettering. The door pulls come in red with the upgrade, while Porsche adds a unique GT Sport steering wheel infused with a red centre marker at the 12 o’clock marker. The Speedster interior also features a beautiful carbon fibre shift knob, and carbon fibre doorsill kick plates with “Speedster” monikers. 

2019 Porsche 911 Speedster
While the Heritage Package more classic touches. (Photo: Porsche)

Those attracted to the new 911 Speedster for its classic proportions and design can opt for a special Heritage Design Package that comes much closer to last year’s concept and ‘50s-era 356 Speedsters. The upgrade adds white front bumper and fender “arrows” on top of GT Silver Metallic paint, while this is how you get the aforementioned gold Speedster lettering too, plus classic Porsche crests. Also, the door-mounted racing-style number stickers can be removed if you don’t like them, but then again if you choose to keep them you can also include your own personal number. Lastly, the upgraded Heritage interior gets two-tone leather with classic Porsche crests sewn onto the headrests, plus body-colour trim gets added to the dash and seatbacks. 

If the new 911 Speedster sounds like your kind of car, be sure to call your local Porsche dealer quickly, and while you’re waiting for delivery of this ultimate drop-top, enjoy a couple of videos below:
 
 
The new Porsche 911 Speedster: First Driving Footage (1:13):
 

 
The new Porsche 911 Speedster: Highlight Film (2:10):
 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche