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Porsche announces new 2021 911 Turbo with pricing and specs

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
As beautiful as it is powerful, the new 911 Turbo is here sporting 572 horsepower.

We’ve all been waiting for it. Now Porsche’s 911 Turbo has been officially unveiled and is available to order as a 2021 model, with deliveries expected later this year.

The 2021 911 Turbo fills one of two holes in Porsche’s lineup between the 911 Carrera S and 911 Turbo S, with the newest generation 911 GTS, which will slot in just below the Turbo, still awaiting official announcement.

Last April the 911 Turbo S was announced first, and considering the output of its 3.8-litre horizontally opposed engine is a staggering 640 horsepower it might at first seem as if the advent of the new Turbo becomes less eventful. Still, the non-S variant’s near identical flat-six has the highest output of any Turbo in history at 572 horsepower, and being that many more Porschephiles will purchase the much more affordable version it remains the more significant new model launch.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
Even those this is an all-new model with no body panel remaining the same as the previous 2019 911 Turbo, it’s unmistakably a Porsche.

Of note, the new 911 Turbo makes 32 more horsepower than its 2019 predecessor, not to mention 30 lb-ft of extra torque for a total of 553 lb-ft. That allows it to blast past 100 km/h in just 2.8 seconds with the optional Sport Chrono Package added onto its slightly lighter Coupe body style, or 2.9 seconds from zero to hero in the Cabriolet. Both times are 0.2 seconds quicker than the 2019 911 Turbo Coupe and 911 Turbo Cabriolet, incidentally, which is a major leap forward on paper, at least (it’s more difficult to feel by the seat of the pants).

All of its performance gains can be attributed in part to new symmetrical VTG (variable turbine geometry) turbochargers that incorporate electrically controlled bypass valves, a reworked charge air cooling system, plus piezo fuel injectors. These improvements result in quicker throttle response, a freer rev range, stronger torque delivery, and improved performance all-round.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
The new 911 Turbo strikes a powerful pose.

The new 2021 911 Turbo sports the identical standard eight-speed dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission as the 911 Turbo S, by the way, while both models also include standard Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive. With the 911 Turbo, a car that can attain track speeds up to 320 km/h (198 mph), such control is needed.

What’s more, the new 2021 911 Turbo boasts the same buffed up exterior contours as the Turbo S, including 46 mm (1.8 in) of extra width than the Carrera between the front fenders and 20 mm (0.8 in) more between the fenders at back. This provides more room for bigger performance rubber measuring 10 mm (0.4 in) more front to rear.

Similarly, the front brake discs are 28 mm (1.1 in) wider than those on the previous 911 Turbo, while those opting for the upcoming 2021 Turbo can also purchase the same 10-piston caliper-infused ceramic brakes made optional with the new Turbo S. Additional extras include the aforementioned Sport Chrono Package, a Sport suspension upgrade, Porsche Active Suspension Management, and a rear-wheel steering system.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
The new 911 Turbo includes all of the interior updates as all new 911 models, plus more.

As you might have expected, Porsche has modified the new 911 Turbo’s cabin with all of the same updates as found in the regular Carrera models, plus some of the features found in the new Turbo S. Standard 14-way powered Sport seats will no doubt provide as much comfort as support, while a standard Bose audio system will keep those not solely enamoured with the sound of the powertrain entertained. Also available, a Lightweight package deletes the rear jump seats (that are only useful if you have small kids or grandkids), and exchanges the standard 14-way front Sport seats for a special set of lightweight performance buckets, while also removing some sound deadening material (that make the engine and exhaust sound better), resulting in 30 kg (66 lbs) of weight savings.

A 911 Turbo Sport package is also on the menu, including some SportDesign upgrades like black and carbon-fibre exterior trim plus clear tail lamps, while a unique sounding Sport exhaust system is also available. Additionally, the options list includes lane keep assist, dynamic cruise control, night vision assist, an overhead parking camera with a 360-degree bird’s-eye view, a Burmester audio system upgrade, etcetera.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
Infotainment and other interior features have been dramatically improved in this latest generation 911.

The all-new 2021 Turbo Coupe is now available to order from your local Porsche retailer for $194,400, while the new 2021 Turbo Cabriolet is available from $209,000, plus fees and freight charges.

Before making that call, mind you, you should check out our 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page as there are factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent that you’ll want to get more info on. Also, take note of any rebates that only CarCostCanada members will find out about, while CarCostCanada members also have access to dealer invoice pricing that could save you even more. See how the CarCostCanada system works now, and remember to download our free CarCostCanada app onto your smartphone or tablet from the Google Android Store or Apple Store, so you can get access to all the most important car shopping info wherever you are.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche endows new 2021 Cayenne GTS with twin-turbocharged V8

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS
Porsche has brought back its Cayenne GTS for 2021, complete with twin-turbo V8 power.

Following Porsche’s usual product launch plan, a new Cayenne GTS has surfaced for the 2021 model year, and while this might normally be a small story about blackened trim, Alcantara interior detailing and a lowered suspension, quite a bit has changed since a Cayenne GTS was last offered three years ago.

As many reading this will already be aware, the Cayenne received a ground-up redesign for 2019, and while such would always occur before a new GTS release, this time around there are two third-generation Cayenne body styles instead of just one, including the regular Cayenne and the new Cayenne Coupe, both of which will be available in new GTS trim.

Also new, the two 2021 Cayenne GTS models will be powered by a twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 instead of the outgoing twin-turbocharged 3.6-litre V6, the change upping horsepower by 13 and torque by 14 lb-ft resulting in a new total of 453 horsepower and 457 lb-ft of torque.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS Coupe
The Cayenne GTS Coupe can be upgraded with a special high-frequency sport exhaust denoted by two larger oval tailpipes in the middle of a more aggressive rear diffuser.

Needless to say the new 2021 Cayenne GTS is faster than its three-year-old predecessor, with both body styles sprinting from standstill to 100 km/h in a scant 4.5 seconds when equipped with their Sport Chrono Packages, which is 0.6 seconds quicker than previous examples. The base Cayenne GTS achieves a zero to 100 km/h sprint in 4.8 seconds, by the way, while both are capable of a 270-km/h terminal velocity, this being an 8-km/h improvement of their predecessor.

The 4.0-litre direct-injection V8 utilizes a new intelligently designed thermal management system as well as adaptive cylinder control to achieve its performance targets, while Porsche’s eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic transmission was once again chosen for shifting duties. Additionally, Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive continues to be standard equipment.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS
The regular Cayenne GTS and base model GTS Coupe have their quad of tailpipes poking out either side of the rear valance.

A beefy standard exhaust system shows two large circular tailpipes poking through each side of a sportier rear fascia, for a total of four, the new look appearing menacing to say the least, while in a press release Porsche claimed they produce “a rich, sporty sound with a unique character.” Those opting for the Cayenne GTS Coupe can alternatively choose a special high frequency-tuned sports exhaust system when also upgrading to the Lightweight Sports Package, the tailpipes on this version of the SUV denoted by even larger oval tips emanating from the centre of the rear bumper.

The renewed Cayenne GTS also gets some suspension upgrades such as a set of redesigned Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) dampers that, when combined with the standard three-chamber Air Suspension, lower the utility’s ride height by 30 mm compared to the current Cayenne S, while Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus) is standard equipment too.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS Coupe
A carbon-fibre roof is available on the Cayenne GTS Coupe.

The base Cayenne GTS and Cayenne GTS Coupe models ride on a special set of black-silk gloss 21-inch RS Spyder Design alloy wheels, although take note that many wheel and tire packages are available. Likewise, grey cast iron 390 by 38 mm front and 358 by 28 mm rear brake rotors come standard, as are a set of red-painted calipers, but the new GTS can be had with the tungsten carbide-coated Porsche Surface Coated Brake (PSCB) system, or better yet the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system. Two additional options include rear-axle steering, and Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) active roll stabilization.

The two new GTS model wouldn’t be complete without a bevy of styling enhancements from the exterior to the interior, so Porsche has added the usual blackened trim bits outside via the standard Sport Design package, which darkens accents on the front air intakes, side window surrounds, exhaust tips, plus the Porsche badges and model designation in back. Likewise, the LED headlamps, which feature the Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS), are tinted black too, as is the new LED taillight bar.

2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS
The Cayenne GTS is once again enhanced with suede-like Alcantara trim.

As is normally the case with GTS models, Porsche covers the interior door and centre console armrests in rich suede-like Alcantara, not to mention the seat centre panels, the roof liner, and more, while dark-brushed aluminum accents separate the GTS’ cabin from the brighter aluminum used on other Cayenne trims.

The standard eight-way powered front sport seats are improved with larger side bolstering too, as well as “GTS” embroidery on the head restraints, but this isn’t the only place you’ll find the renowned GTS emblem. Check out the primary gauge cluster’s tachometer dial, the door entry sills, and the front outer door panels too. Those wanting more can opt for a GTS interior package that features Carmine Red or Chalk colour accents, including decorative stitching.

The new 2021 Cayenne GTS and 2021 Cayenne GTS Coupe are now available to order from your local Porsche dealer ahead of arriving during Q4 of 2020, while respective pricing starts at $120,400 and $126,500, plus freight and fees.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Stunning new Prophecy Concept EV offers window into Hyundai’s future

2020 Hyundai Prophecy Concept EV
We certainly like what we see. Hyundai’s new Optimistic Futurism design language looks to the past as well.

As new vehicles are turning into little more than rolling computers for transporting people and their gear, they’re in fact becoming less complicated than their predecessors, at least from a driving and styling perspective.

Hyundai’s new Prophecy Concept EV is a good example of minimalism meets modern-day tech thanks to the automaker’s new Optimistic Futurism design language that’s been created with the purpose of connecting consumers more completely with their vehicles, or so says the head of Hyundai’s global design center, SangYup Lee, as part of the electric’s car’s press release.

“We have brought to life yet another icon that establishes a new standard for the EV segment as well as pushing Hyundai’s design vision to even broader horizons,” commented Lee. “A part of that expansion is what we call Optimistic Futurism, a design concept embodied by ‘Prophecy’. With Optimistic Futurism, our aim is to forge an emotional connection between humans and automobiles.”

2020 Hyundai Prophecy Concept EV
Would Hyundai be able to sell its Prophecy if built today?

Developing emotional ties between buyers and products is a top priority of every effective brand, and this in mind Hyundai should do well with whatever comes of its new Prophecy, or at least the design language behind it. With the Prophecy, the Korean automaker’s namesake brand has created a styling exercise that’s both retrospectively minimalist and brilliantly detailed, resulting in a look that pulls cues from some iconic rivals, yet sets off on its own course too.

Yes, the complex curves that make up its outward design could have just as easily been concocted by Porsche for a future Panamera or even the new Taycan EV, not that it appears like either, but this said few automakers dare attempt to style a car with as many rounded edges as Porsche, let alone a grille-less front end like Tesla’s Model 3.

This said its seemingly vented rear end styling, which pulls attention from the large transparent acrylic rear wing resting above, reminds of the post-war Tucker 48, also particularly aerodynamic for its time, while mixed in with its pixelated 3D elements are LEDs for a set of protruding tail lamps. A similar pattern can be seen in the headlamp clusters up front, which use the same transparent acrylic as the rear spoiler and in the camera monitoring system, but the two headlights look a great deal more conventional than the eye-catching taillight design.

2020 Hyundai Prophecy Concept EV
These taillights are wild!

All of the features above improve aerodynamics, of course, which is why forerunning EVs have chosen their own unique variations of the Prophecy’s familiar design theme, but Hyundai’s propeller-inspired alloy wheels, which direct air down each side of the car’s body, are unique.

Hyundai hasn’t released any exterior or interior dimensions, but an open set of clamshell doors makes its mid-size four-door coupe layout clear, while the only available technical specifications depict a 100-percent electric power unit with a battery housed under the passenger compartment floor. Therefore, we expect it will ride on a completely new architecture that could provide multiple body styles on top.

The Prophecy’s interior features tartan-patterned upholstery that pays yet more homage to Porsche, particularly its 1975-1980 911, 924 and 928 models with blue-green being a popular colour combination at the time, yet nothing the Stuttgart-headquartered performance marque has ever done managed to achieve the eyeball-popping wow factor of Hyundai’s new creation, and not only because the South Koreans use the aforementioned Scottish kilt pattern for the seats’ side bolsters as well as their central insets.

2020 Hyundai Prophecy Concept EV
The Prophecy’s interior is ultra-future think.

The Prophecy’s sizeable wraparound digital display, which frames the windshield’s base, isn’t all that impressive these days either, but the pop-out primary instrument cluster is, yet even that won’t upstage the car’s driving controls. Obviously missing is a steering wheel, which has been replaced by a pair of pivoting joysticks, this ode to gaming apropos in a car that’s designed to be driven autonomously.

Of course, we won’t ever see the Prophecy on the road, its existence designed only to show new car buyers that Hyundai has an exciting future styling direction. If produced as is, we think Hyundai would have a hit in their hands. 

 

Hyundai | “Prophecy” Concept EV Unveiling (16:04):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo and video credits: Hyundai

CarCostCanada

Porsche reveals new 394 hp 718 Cayman and Boxster GTS 4.0

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
The upcoming 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 gets similar blackened exterior trim to other GTS models. (Photo: Porsche)

It was only a couple of weeks after Porsche put out a press release announcing Canadian pricing, features and specs for their new 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T lightweight performance models, plus details about the base, S, GT4 and Spyder variants of the same updated 2020 Cayman and Boxster, and surprisingly the upcoming 2021 718 GTS was (and still is) all over the interweb.

Up until the current 2020 model year, fourth-generation Cayman and Boxster models were only available with turbocharged four-cylinder powerplants, but thanks to the new GT4 and Spyder a formidable 4.0-litre six-cylinder engine was added to the mix. Now, hot on the heels of those two top-tier 718 models, Porsche is announcing the refreshed 2021 718 Cayman GTS and 718 Boxster GTS with horizontally opposed six-cylinder power as well.

Those who follow all things Porsche will know that the brand’s GTS trim, while not necessarily the fastest in a given model line, will be one of the sportiest thanks to blacked out exterior trim and unique aero upgrades, powertrain improvements, suspension modifications, and more often than not a curb weight reduction, and the new 2021 718 GTS takes all of the above to new extremes.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
Fabulous looking 2021 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 should go as good as it looks. (Photo: Porsche)

The outgoing 718 GTS lineup, which was with us from model years 2018 to 2019, already put out an impressive 365-horsepower and 317 lb-ft of torque, but its power came from a 2.5-litre turbocharged flat-four. Sure it was 500 cubic centimetres larger than the 2.0-litre turbo-four in the 718’s base, S and T trims, while making 65 extra horsepower and 37 more lb-ft of torque, but it still wasn’t anywhere near as capable as the naturally aspirated 4.0-litre H-6 in this new GTS.

Porschephiles will already be well aware of the just-mentioned GT4 and Spyder models, particularly about their shared six-cylinder powerplant that boasts 414 horsepower, and while it’s down some 20 horsepower in this new GTS, it still makes a formidable 394 horsepower and an identical 309 pound-feet of torque.

That’s superb performance from a trim that will soon slot between both 718 T models priced at $74,400 for the coupe and $76,800 for the convertible, and the two new top-line cars that start at $110,500 for the Spyder and $113,800 for the GT4. The new engine, which revs all the way up to 7,800 rpm, makes Porsche’s renowned six-cylinder bark and therefore should appeal to the countless diehard fans of the German brand, while the melodic notes emanating from the engine compartment behind the seats get improved upon by a standard twin-tailpipe sport exhaust system.

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
The new 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 makes 394 hp from a new H-6 engine. (Photo: Porsche)

While fuel efficiency probably isn’t the first reason someone chooses a premium sports car, the new engine includes cylinder deactivation dubbed adaptive cylinder control, a technology that alternately shuts off one of its two cylinder banks under low loads, while the direct injection system uses piezo injectors plus a variable intake system to enhance efficiency further while also improving performance.

Like the sporty 718 T models that we covered in this publication in early January, the new 718 GTS adds standard performance items like a mechanical limited-slip differential, Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), and the Sport Chrono Package with a special Porsche Track Precision App featuring a lap timer.

Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package provides a handy “push-to-pass” style Sport Response button in the middle of the steering wheel-mounted rotating drive mode switch, as well as Launch Control with the optional seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK gearbox.

When using their base six-speed manual transmission, however, both new 2021 718 GTS models sprint from zero to 100 km/h in just 4.5 seconds, paring 0.1 seconds from the outgoing 718 GTS’s acceleration time, while the two only 0.1 seconds slower to 100 km/h than the ultra-hot 718 GT4 and Spyder.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
The new 718 GTS 4.0 models are filled with suede-like Alcantara surfaces. (Photo: Porsche)

Additionally, the two 718 GTS models increase their top track speeds by 3 km/h to 293 km/h—the GT4 and Spyder manage a respective 304 and 301 km/h. Porsche hasn’t announced performance numbers for the new 718 GTS with its available PDK gearbox, but the dual-clutch paddle-shift actuated transmission slices 0.2 seconds from the GT4 and Spyder’s zero to 100km/h sprint time, so we can expect something similar from the GTS.

Together with the new 718 GTS’ accelerative advantages, a bevy of standard upgrades also make for greater agility around corners, like Porsche Active Drivetrain Mounts (PADM) that integrate dynamic hard and soft transmission mounts to reduce vibration and therefore improve performance, plus the new model’s special Satin-Gloss Black-painted 20-inch alloys encircled by staggered-width 235/35 front and 265/35 rear tires make sure the new 718 models remain glued to the tarmac below.

Porsche’s Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damping system also comes standard, the technology instantly adjusting for irregular road surfaces, weather conditions, and changes to driving styles, all depending on whether Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual driving modes are selected.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
An available GTS interior package adds a red tachometer dial at centre. (Photo: Porsche)

The two 718 GTS models also get a 20-millimetre drop in suspension height when compared to lesser trims, the 718 T duo aside, lowering their centres of gravity for improved control all-round. The base cast-iron brakes are larger in diameter too, up to 350 mm in front and 33 mm at the rear, resulting in quicker stopping times. Just in case you want to slow down even faster, Porsche provides its usual upgrade to composite ceramic brakes.

In order to visually separate the new GTS models from other 718 trims, Porsche has added dark grey “GTS 4.0” decals to each door, while other styling upgrades include plenty of darkened exterior accents such as a black front lip spoiler, an all-black lower front fascia including a special Sport Design air intake, blackened front fog lamp lenses and taillights, plus a redesigned rear bumper cap and black chrome exhaust tips. Of course, we can’t forget about those glossy black 20-inch alloy wheels mentioned earlier either. 

The 718 GTS’s cabin features a GT sport steering wheel, plus a scripted “GTS” logo at the centre of the primary instrument cluster’s rev counter, while woven carbon trim highlights the instrument panel and middle console, and dark grey Alcantara provides plush grip to the steering wheel, the centre console, the gear shift knob and surrounding skirt, each door insert and all of the armrests, plus the centre panels of the standard sport seats, while each A-pillar gets wrapped in the soft suede-like material too, as does the roof liner in the hardtop coupe.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
Both this 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 and the Cayman coupe version are brilliantly fun around corners. (Photo: Porsche)

An available GTS interior package lets you choose between contrasting Carmine Red or chalk grey/beige Crayon for the tachometer gauge’s face, the seatbelts, the floor mat borders, and the cabin’s decorative stitching, including embroidered “GTS” logos on each headrest.

The Porsche Communication Management (PCM) centre touchscreen is standard as usual, measuring 7.0 inches and housing plenty of functions pulled up from lower end trims, plus of course the previously noted Track Precision App. This application originated in motorsport, and is downloadable to your Apple or Android smartphone. It provides performance-related data on the GTS’ centre display while on the track, and simultaneously records said data on your device for analysis after leaving the circuit.

The PCM also incorporates a navigation system with real-time traffic information, optional voice control, and Porsche Connect. Additionally, music aficionados will be happy to learn that an available Bose surround sound system can improve on the standard audio system, while Burmester surround sound audio takes the listening experience to an entirely new level.

You’ll be able to order the new 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 and 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 from your Porsche retailer by the summer of 2020, with deliveries following in the fall.

Until that happens, be sure to watch the videos below:

 

The all new 718 GTS 4.0. More of what you love. (1:52):

 

Porsche GTS. More of what you love. (1:30):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche reveals new 2020 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T pricing

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T
Porsche is bringing a new “T” trim line to its 718 Boxster and Cayman (shown) lineup for 2020. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche launched its enticing 718 T models to its lucky European customers last year, so now it’s time for sports car fans on our side of the pond to get up close and personal with this duo of high-speed, quick handling cars.

With a window sticker of $74,400 for the 718 Cayman T and $76,800 for the 718 Boxster T, showing an increase of $10,700 over their respective base models, the sporty new offerings slot in between the base model and S trims. The already generous 718 line also includes the even sportier GTS model, while other offerings include the track-ready Cayman GT4 and stunning Spyder.

Unlike these more powerful alternatives, the new 718 T designation means the same 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder boxer engine as the base cars gets fitted midships. It makes 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque, which is plenty for the lightweight coupe and convertible, but a short-throw shifter gets thrown into the mix of six-speed manual cars too, plus a mechanically locking differential and Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), whereas seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK models get the Sport Chrono Package standard, resulting in 0.2 seconds lopped off its zero to 100 km/h time, and that’s from a car already good for shaving 0.2 seconds off the manual’s straight-line acceleration time.

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T
A 20-mm lower suspension and other upgrades makes the new 718 T models sportier than their base siblings. (Photo: Porsche)

The Sport Chrono Package includes Launch Control too, as well as a “push-to-pass” style Sport Response button in the centre of the steering wheel-mounted driving mode switch, making PDK the way to go if you want to move fastest with the least amount of hassle.

T stands for “Touring” in Porsche-speak, however, which according to a January 7, 2020 press release provides “driving pleasure in its purest form,” adding “the 718 T will be most at home on winding country roads,” so possibly the manual should be higher on your priority list?

Being that the new T models utilize the same powertrains as their base counterparts, their acceleration times are identical at zero to 100 km/h in 5.1 seconds apiece for manual-equipped cars and 4.9 to 4.7 seconds for PDK models, while all feature top track speeds of 275 km/h.

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
Plenty of interior updates are included, but don’t let the missing infotainment system worry you as PCM comes standard here. (Photo: Porsche)

This said the big 718 T updates impact handling, with key enhancements including Porsche Active Drivetrain Mounts (PADM) that feature dynamic hard and soft gearbox mounts for reduced vibration and improved performance, as well as a sport exhaust system, high-gloss titanium grey-painted 20-inch five-spoke alloy rims, and the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damping system (a first for the base turbocharged four-cylinder engine) that, depending on the Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual driving mode chosen, makes instant adjustments for road conditions and driving style changes. All items just listed roll on a 20-millimetre lower ride height, resulting in a lower centre of gravity and therefore better control.

A grey side striping package with “718 Cayman T” or “718 Boxster T” script adds visual impact, as do Agate grey-painted mirror housings designed to match the alloys, while a set of black chrome tailpipes finish off changes to the back end.

Seated inside, a GT sport steering wheel will be close at hand, while scripted “Cayman T” or “Boxster T” logos highlight the black instrument dials just ahead. The 718 T interiors will also feature gloss black instrument panel inlays and centre console trim, red paint for the gear shift pattern atop the shift knob, two-way powered seats, seat upholstery incorporating black Sport-Tex centre sections, embroidered “718” logos on the headrests, and most identifiably of all, black mesh fabric door pulls in place of the usual inner door handles, which can be changed for available coloured pulls.

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster T
These door pulls replace the regular door handles. (Photo: Porsche)

When eyeing up the interior you may also notice their Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreens missing from both cars’ instrument panels, which were removed to reduce weight in European models. Due to a regulation that made backup cameras mandatory as of May 2018, this won’t be the case for Canadian-spec 718 T models, but instead it will receive an identical high-resolution infotainment display to the one found in today’s 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster.

Finally, for your personalization pleasure, the new 718 T models can be painted in plenty of colours including standard Black, Guards Red, Racing Yellow, and White, optional Carrara White, Jet Black and GT Silver metallics, with the special colours being Lava Orange and Miami Blue.

The new 2020 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T can be ordered from your local Porsche dealer now, with deliveries arriving this coming summer.

Until then, check out the videos below:

 
The new Porsche 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T. Welcome to life. (1:17):

 

The new Porsche 718 Boxster T and 718 Cayman T. First Driving Footage. (1:49):

 

JP Performance Test Drive: The Porsche 718 T Models. (1:08):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

2019 Toyota 86 GT Road Test

2019 Toyota 86 GT
Still beautiful after all these years, Toyota’s 86 refresh three years ago helped keep its graceful lines fresh.

Have you ever had one of those moments when everything you thought was true turned on its head? Researching this review wasn’t one of those moments, but I was nevertheless shocked to find out that Subaru’s BRZ had outsold Toyota’s 86 by almost 10 percent in 2018, and as of last November’s close was ahead by a staggering 150 percent.

If you weren’t already aware, Toyota’s 86 and the previous Scion FR-S always found many more buyers than Subaru’s version of this compact sport coupe. No matter whether being sold under the less known Scion brand or while wearing Toyota’s famed double-oval logo, it’s success just came down to the sheer number of bodies flowing in and out of Canada’s second-best-selling automaker’s dealerships, whereas Subaru is 13th on Canadian sales charts and therefore could never have as many potential buyers enter its establishments. Still, the comparatively tiny all-wheel drive specialty brand is literally beating Toyota at its own two-wheel drive game.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
GT and TRD Special Edition trims include a sporty spoiler on the rear deck lid.

This could be due to the BRZ being a medium-sized fish in a little pond, compared to the 86 that’s more of a minnow trying to get noticed in an ocean of much more popular Toyota product. Certainly the BRZ is no big seller for Subaru either, but consider for a moment that the 86 represents just 0.1 percent of the 200,041 Toyotas sold in Canada over the past 11 months, compared to the BRZ that was a much more significant 1.2 percent of the 52,853 Subarus sold during the same period, and it’s easy to see why it might garner a bit more importance in a Subaru retailer’s lineup. 

As it is, the 86 has seen its sales decline at a rapid rate over the past couple of years. Since it first arrived on the Canadian scene in 2012, resulting in 1,470 deliveries within its initial seven months, its popularity has plunged from 1,825 units in 2013, to 1,559 in 2014, 1,329 in 2015, 988 in 2016, 919 in 2017, and finally 550 in 2018, while year-to-date it’s only sold a scant 250 units. This represents a 53.3-percent drop over the same 11 months last year, while the BRZ’s 625 deliveries over the same duration shows an 8.1-percent increase.

Of course, the BRZ isn’t the 86’ only competitor, just its most obvious being they’re identical cars below very similar skins. Mazda’s MX-5, which sold 767 units so far this year, resulting in 26.99 percent year-over-year growth, joins the BRZ by showing there’s some renewed interest in the entry-level sports car segment as long as the updates focus on the needs and desires of its uniquely passionate customer base.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
The LED headlights and 17-inch rims are standard across the 86 line, but the fog lamps are part of the GT upgrade.

The fact is, the 86 hasn’t been updated since its 2017 model year refresh and concurrent Scion FR-S transformation, other than some special editions, and as to the importance of updating aging models, its sales numbers speak for themselves. So what’s going to happen to this beloved sports car in the near future? That’s anyone’s guess, and we shouldn’t rely wholly on the words of a U.S.-market Toyota spokesperson who told us last year that the 86 was here to stay for the foreseeable future.

If you think the sad state of 86 sales is merely a problem for Toyota Canada, consider that the 3,122 units delivered in the U.S. market over the past 11 months also represents about 0.1 percent of Toyota’s total 1,913,159 unit output up until November’s end, so the car merely exists to improve Toyota’s performance branding, and I think the new 2020 Supra will do a much better job of that this year.

Nevertheless, Toyota hasn’t completely forgotten its most affordable sports car, the 2020 86 soon to arrive with a 0.9-inch larger 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen featuring a revised interface capable of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration plus more, but before I get into that, let’s talk about this 2019 model and the changes made three years ago.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
GT trim adds plush Alcantara faux-suede across the dash, door panels and seats.

Toyota updated the 86’ frontal design for the 2017 model year, with new standard LED headlights, revised front fender vents positioned lower on the side panel with a new “86” insignia, and a fresh set of taillights featuring brighter LED technology. The interior, which has always been quite nice for this class, was made more easily accessible via available proximity keyless entry, while the ignition could be started and stopped with a button. Additional upgrades included optional two-zone automatic climate control, leather and Alcantara upholstery, with the suede-like material also topping the primary instrument hood and passenger-side dash insert.

The 2019 86 continues forward with a Toyota-branded 6.1-inch centre touchscreen featuring attractive blue on black patterned graphics, all the normal radio functions, USB integration, plus Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, although fans that hoped to find the backup camera’s image on the main display were disappointed (including yours truly) to find it still projected from within the rearview mirror. This makes the mirror less useful, and being that the camera’s display is so small, it becomes a double negative when trying to reverse on a rainy night. Of course, Toyota will remedy this problem when the new larger 2020 infotainment system arrives, correct? No, unfortunately that touchscreen is bigger and functionality more complete, but it won’t be used for reversing purposes.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
The upgrade to GT trim includes a 4.2-inch multi-information display with performance data.

I’m forced to point back to the North American sales figures noted earlier, but I can’t say for sure whether or not they’d increase significantly if Toyota made the 86 more practical. I’d guess that it would be nigh impossible to cover the increased costs of integrating a rearview camera within the centre display for the 6,200 year-to-date 86 and BRZ models sold into our two countries (the only two global markets that mandate backup cameras), so we’re left with this half-measure to satisfy the requirements of legislators. All I can say is, 15 minutes of fast-paced shenanigans down a circuitous mountainside pass and you won’t care one whit about backing up.

Did you notice I said “down” a mountainside pass? That’s due to the 86’ Subaru-sourced 2.0-litre “boxer” four-cylinder engine, which once again makes just 205 horsepower and 156 lb-ft of torque for 2019. Don’t get me wrong as I personally find this wholly adequate, particularly when tooling around town or flinging this little sensation down a winding road, as it weighs in at just 1,252 kg (2,760 lbs) and therefore doesn’t need a whole lot of power. Still, its ardent fan-base has been calling out for more engine output for years, and those steadily falling sales numbers might mean that those prospective buyers are right. Toyota pumped up horsepower and torque by 2.5 and 3.3 percent respectively for 2017, but that obviously didn’t get anyone excited, so the automaker may want to lean on Subaru to give up its new 268 horsepower 2.0-litre turbocharged WRX engine, or better yet the 310-hp 2.5-litre WRX STI mill.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
The centre stack includes a 6.1-inch touchscreen and auto HVAC.

Actual 86 output was increased by five horsepower and five lb-ft of torque for 2017, which while slightly improved only represented a respective 2.5 and 3.3 percent more beef added to a very lean, near vegan diet, so therefore it didn’t answer the continual online petition from the model’s faithful for much more performance.

Notably, only six-speed manual equipped 86s get the power upgrade, which also joined a revised rear differential tuned for quicker standing starts. Also available is a six-speed automatic with paddles shifters, complete with rev-matched downshifting that works very well as experienced in my 2017 86 tester, but as just mentioned it only gets the old 200 horsepower engine with 151 lb-ft of torque. On the positive both cars were upgraded with hill start assist in 2017, which certainly helps when taking off in hilly areas.

I enjoyed the automatic a lot more than I first expected to, particularly when driving around the city, but being that the 86 is a serious rear-wheel drive sports car designed for enthusiasts, unlike the ever-shrinking class of compact car-based front-wheel drive sporty coupes available, I’d only personally consider the manual.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
A tiny reverse camera is integrated within the rearview mirror.

After all, modulating the clutch while letting the engine revs climb up to 7,000 rpm for max power is the optimal way to eke the most performance from the engine’s available power, no matter if you’re pulling away from a stoplight or quickly exiting a curve, while that last point in mind the 86 remains one of the best ways to quickly snake through a serpentine canyon road or equally curvaceous ribbon of tarmac anywhere else.

MacPherson gas struts are positioned under the hood up front while double wishbones take care of the fully independent rear suspension, while it’s possible to move up from my tester’s most luxurious GT trim to a manual-only TRD Special Edition (or SE) model hiding SACHS performance dampers behind its upgraded Brembo brakes and one-inch larger 18-inch alloys wrapped in 215/40R18 Michelin Pilot Sport 4 performance rubber. My tester would’ve normally worn 215/45R17 summers, but Toyota smartly swapped those tire out for a set of Bridgestone Blizzak winters that actually made it more fun to slide sideways mid-turn.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
Comfortable and supportive, Alcantara helps these superb front seats grip even better.

Speaking of trims, the 2019 86 can be had as a base, GT or just-mentioned SE, with some thus-far not mentioned entry-level base highlights including a limited slip differential, auto on/off LED headlights, heatable power-remote outside mirrors, remote entry, a tilt and telescoping leather-clad multifunction three-spoke sport steering wheel, a leather-wrapped shift knob and handbrake lever, aluminum sport pedals, a trip computer/multi-info display, cruise control, variable intermittent windshield wipers, one-zone automatic HVAC, an eight-speaker AM/FM audio system with auxiliary and USB ports plus an Automatic Sound Levelizer (ASL), Bluetooth phone and streaming audio, a six-way manual driver’s seat, power windows with auto up/down, dual vanity mirrors, all the expected active and passive safety features and more for only $29,990 (plus freight and fees).

The auto transmission costs $1,200 extra, which is the same whether opting for a base 86 or my $33,260 as-tested GT tester. GT trim wasn’t on the menu when I reviewed the 2017 86, by the way, but most of its features were part of a Special Edition that now shares its more performance-oriented upgrades with the top-line SE trim noted a moment ago. Before I delve into that TRD special, I should point out that GT trim adds the proximity keyless entry and pushbutton ignition system I noted earlier, plus the dual-zone auto climate control and more luxurious leather and microsuede upholstery I spoke about, while its front seats add heaters as part of this package, with additional GT upgrades including LED fog lights, a rear spoiler, a 4.2-inch TFT multi-information display showing performance data, and theft deterrence.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
Tight for adults, these rear seats nevertheless make the 86 more practical than most rivals.

Finally, the $38,220 SE trim, or more specifically the TRD (Toyota Racing Development) Special Edition adds black side mirror housings, a cool TRD aero kit, a TRD performance dual exhaust upgrade, unique cloth sport seats with sporty red accents, red seatbelts, and red stitching throughout the cabin, plus the wheel/tire and suspension mods noted before.

Trims, packages and pricing in mind, 2019 86 buyer are able to access up to $2,000 in additional incentives right now. Just go to our 2019 Toyota 86 Canada Prices page right here at CarCostCanada to learn more, but then again if you really want the upgraded infotainment system (CarPlay and Android integration can be helpful) then check out the 2020 Toyota 86 Canada Prices page, which will show you how to benefit from factory leasing and financing rates from 3.49 percent. Both pages provide complete pricing information as well as info about manufacturer rebates and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

Toyota replaces the TRD Special Edition with a new Hakone Edition for 2020, which features special Hakone Green paint and rolls on unique 17-inch bronze-coloured alloy wheels; the name reportedly paying tribute to “one of the greatest driving roads in the world,” or so says Toyota.

2019 Toyota 86 GT
A sports car you can live with thanks to an expandable trunk.

One thing that shouldn’t change from 2019 to 2020 is fuel economy, the 86 rated at 9.9 L/100km city, 7.3 highway and 8.7 combined when fitted with its manual, or 11.3, 8.3 9.9 respectively with its autobox. While not best in the sports car class, it’s still pretty decent for anything that drives as well as it does.

This said most buying into this class won’t give a rat’s derriere about fuel-efficiency, but when compared to some rivals that only offer two front seats the 86’ rear bench might come in handy, and importantly its single-piece rear seatback folds flat in order to extend the reasonably sized 196-litre (6.9 cubic-foot) trunk, which I’ve actually seen filled up with four racing slicks on wheels (a beautiful sight).

A new 86 would certainly make one wonderfully reliable weekend racer, not to mention a great way to get to work and back. All for less than $30k? Yes, it should sell a lot better than it does.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech Road Test

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
The sharp looking second-generation Veloster, seen here in Turbo Tech trim, looks like a sporty two-door coupe from the driver’s side. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Hyundai’s Veloster could easily be seen as an automotive anomaly, a sports coupe cum four-door hatchback that doesn’t quite fit in to either category, but I see it as a best-of-both-worlds alternative, a sporty two-door coupe when seen from the driver’s side and a low-slung four-door liftback from the passenger’s side.

There’s good reason that such a small number of volume-branded compact sport coupes remain in today’s car market after all. Owners eventually tired of stuffing family and friends into their abbreviated back seats, so they purchased sporty four- and five-door alternatives instead. These days, even the legendary VW Golf GTI is only available with four doors and a hatch, but instead of ultimately conforming to such wagon-like levels of pragmatism, Hyundai adapted General Motors’ 1999 Saturn SC’s terribly executed yet brilliantly idea, which included a single door on the passenger’s side and a second rear-hinged half-door on the driver’s side for easier rear seat access, by adding a conventionally-hinged rear door to the more appropriate passenger’s side for easier entry from the curb.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
The Veloster provides a rear door for easy access to the seats in back on the passenger’s side. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

During its first full calendar year of 2012, Canadian Veloster sales were fairly strong at 5,741 units, but they’ve steadily tapered off since resulting in a low of 1,077 units in 2018, but thanks to a total redesign for this 2019 model year the second-generation Veloster has found 36.6 percent more buyers than it did during the first 10 months of 2018, resulting in 1,295 deliveries as of October 2019. Still, that’s nothing to get excited about in a market that saw Hyundai sell 25,894 Tucson compact SUVs during the same time period, let alone 33,670 Elantras, while a recent downturn of just 279 Velosters sold during Q3 of 2019, representing a plunge of 55.1 percent compared to the same three months of 2018, isn’t the kind of response the brand wants to see for a completely redesigned model, so we’ll need to watch closely to find out how it fares during Q4.

Before Hyundai decides to transform the Veloster into a mainstream version of Mercedes’ new GLC Coupe in order to keep its sporty dreams alive while the entire globe realigns its interests away from cars towards crossovers and SUVs (kind of like how Mitsubishi did with its Eclipse Cross), those who still appreciate the lower centres of gravity and inherently better cornering prowess allowed by cars should be made aware of the new Veloster’s transformation from a torsion beam rear suspension to an independent multi-link design, the revision completely improving its at-the-limit handling and ride quality.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
The redesigned Veloster’s grille and front fascia looks much more menacing than the previous generation. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The updated Veloster’s undercarriage is much more compliant, resulting in a more comfortable city cruiser with less commotion over rough, uneven tarmac, yet the compact coupe still feels firm enough to come off like a sports car. Nevertheless, despite its more comforting suspension tuning the new Veloster Turbo is a lot more capable through fast-paced corners, particularly noticeable over mid-apex bumps and potholes that would’ve unsettled the previous car. Now you slice through the turn with less worry about the shape of the pavement below, its rear suspension now capable of absorbing such irregularities without losing grip.

Base Velosters come standard with a 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine making 147 horsepower and 132 lb-ft of torque, driving the front wheels through a standard six-speed manual or optional six-speed automatic transmission, while the Veloster Turbo tested here utilizes a 1.6-litre turbo-four capable of 201 horsepower and 195 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual gearbox remains standard, as witnessed here in the photos, but buyers wanting less daily hassle can opt for a new seven-speed dual-clutch EcoShift DCT automatic with steering wheel paddles. I’ve driven the previous six-speed DCT (in 2014, 2015 and 2016) and found it shifted quickly enough while offering smooth operation during day-to-day commutes, so it make sense the new seven-speed version provides the same level of drivability with the addition of a taller final gear to improve fuel economy, but I’d personally save $1,500 by opting for the manual and enjoy the benefits of rowing through the gears myself.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
No shortage of sporty styling cues on the new Veloster Turbo. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

It really is a nicely sorted six-speed manual, with an easy, progressive clutch that’s well matched to the torquey turbo-four. Max twist arrives at just 1,500 rpm and maintains boost all the way to 4,500, while maximum thrust arrives at 6,000 rpm before the engine spins to its 7,000 rpm redline (or just above). Activating the optional “SPORT” button just next to the shift lever immediately transforms the Veloster Turbo from an enjoyably tame economy coupe to a seriously fun performance machine, so a move up to the Tech package is well worth it.

Before itemizing standard and optional features, we should talk fuel economy. I know the Veloster is a performance model, but even those looking to save at the pump might want to consider this sporty little car, especially the Turbo. Yes, despite its stronger performance the Turbo is better on fuel (as long as you don’t lay into the throttle too often), with a manual transmission comparo showing 9.4 L/100km in the city, 7.0 on the highway and 8.3 combined for the Turbo, next to 9.4 city, 7.1 highway and 8.4 combined for the base model. The Turbo looks even better when comparing automatic transmissions, at 8.5 city, 6.9 highway and 7.8 combined for the quicker car against a respective 9.1, 7.1 and 8.2.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
Hyundai makes big improvements inside, but touchy, feely perceived quality is still this car’s weak point. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Now that we’re being so practical, the rear tailgate opens up nice and high, plus it’s wide enough to fit in large items. The cargo area isn’t as sizeable as most of its compact hatchback rivals, but compared to challenging sport coupes it’s very accommodating. In fact, it measures 565 litres (20 cubic feet) behind the rear seatbacks, or approximately the size of a large sedan’s trunk, while it’s also 125 litres (4.4 cu ft) larger than its 440-litre (15.5 cu-ft) cargo compartment. If you need more storage you can drop the back seats down, their uniquely configured 66/33-split design making more sense for a car only capable of seating two rear passengers. With both seats lowered the Veloster can manage up to 1,260 litres (44.5 cu ft) of what-have-you, which once again is a major improvement when compared to the 982 litres (34.7 cubic feet) offered by the outgoing generation.

The lengthy driver’s door and proximity keyless access make entering to the driver’s seat easy, while the two passenger-side doors means that no one coming along for the ride needs to compromise. Certainly, the first rear passenger to sit down must slide along the seat to find the other side, making me wish Hyundai hadn’t added a fixed centre console with cupholders in the middle, and while a folding centre armrest would’ve worked better, it wasn’t all that difficult to get over and does provide some helpful convenience when seated.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
This analogue/digital gauge cluster is easy to read under any lighting conditions, plus it can be upgraded to include a head-up display. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

After positioning the driver’s seat for my five-foot-eight, long-legged, short-torso body, I was left with approximately four to five inches in front of my knees, as well as plenty of space for my feet, but it was a bit tight for my toes below the driver’s seat. Still, I had ample room to move around from side to side, plus about three inches over my head, making me confident that those under six feet should find it spacious enough in back.

The rear seats are carved out like buckets too, providing decent lateral support and good lower back comfort. Other than rear window switches there aren’t any rear amenities, while the side armrests will be the only padded surfaces you’ll be able to find (seats and carpets aside).

Such is true for those up front as well, this shortcoming my only serious complaint with the new Veloster. I understand that we should expect too much in this category, but Hyundai normally punches above its weight in the compact class, so I expected them to do more with this redesigned model. As it is, the new Veloster offers no soft-touch composite surfaces, but the mostly attractive matte textured plastics provided a nice upgrade over the otherwise glossy hard plastic cabin.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
A well-sorted centre stack gets an available 8-inch touchscreen up top and good quality switchgear throughout. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Most peoples’ eyes will naturally gravitate to the red on black front sport seats anyway, and I must say the one for the driver was as comfortable and supportive as it looks. While not included full powered actuation, its optional two-way powered lumbar support was a useful addition that nearly met the small of my back perfectly. Ergonomics are also good, with the long reaching tilt and telescopic steering column a good match to the six-way adjustable driver’s seat, plus the seat heaters and warming steering wheel came on fast and stayed hot.

Quickly pressing the start/stop button on the instrument panel ignites the engine while prompting a head-up display to power upwards from within the cowl covering the primary gauges. I initially found it slightly distracting, because it’s right in the line of sight, but when choosing sport mode it placed a cool tachometer graphic on the screen that was useful when pushing the engine to redline, while I eventually learned to look past it the rest of the time. The mostly analogue gauge cluster noted a moment ago is easy to see in any light and features a colour multi-information display at centre, while the switchgear on the steering wheel, plus all the buttons and knobs to the left and right of the steering column were good quality, nicely damped, and within easy reach.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
The larger screen makes for an excellent backup camera with dynamic guidelines, while rear parking sensors help while reversing. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Ditto for the infotainment display, but the only button next to the screen turned on the hazard lights. Instead, the touchscreen’s analogue controls are lower down the centre stack, in between the audio system’s power/volume and tuning/scrolling dials, although I found myself using the steering wheel switches and touchscreen for the majority of features.

Due to Hyundai adding the $3,000 Turbo Tech package, which includes the aforementioned head-up display unit, the leather upholstery, the driver’s seat lumbar support, and the Sport mode, plus rain-sensing windshield wipers, rear parking sonar, and the automatic HVAC system, which incidentally comes with automatic defog, my tester had a larger 8.0-inch display featuring embedded navigation plus excellent (for the class) sounding eight-speaker Infinity audio with an external amplifier.

Before getting ahead of myself, you can get into the 2019 Veloster for just $20,999 plus freight and fees before discount, with the Turbo starting at $25,899. The Turbo Tech package ups the price to $28,899, while a $500 Performance package was added to my tester, including sportier 18-inch rims encircled by 225/40 Michelin Pilot summer-performance rubber.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
My tester’s comfortable leather-upholstered seats also included two-way powered lumbar. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

This said, even base Velosters get 18-inch alloy wheels, as well as auto on/off headlamps, LED daytime running lights, power-adjustable and heated side mirrors, remote access, a heated and leather-wrapped multifunction steering wheel, tilt and telescopic steering, cruise control, powered windows, illuminated vanity mirrors, a sunglasses holder, filtered air conditioning, a one-inch smaller 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen with standard Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, a backup camera with active guidelines, six-speaker audio, Bluetooth hands-free phone and audio streaming, a leather-clad shift knob, heatable front seats, a manual six-way driver’s seat, a four-way front passenger seat, blind spot detection with rear cross-traffic alert, all the usual active and passive safety features, etcetera.

The Veloster Turbo upgrade adds LED headlamps, LED side mirror turn signals, LED tail lamps, a special grille plus extended side sills, proximity entry with pushbutton star/stop, a 4.2-inch TFT multi-information display instead of a more conventional 3.5-inch trip computer, a big power moonroof, silver vent bezels, checkered dash trim, partial cloth/leather upholstery with red stitching instead of blue, leatherette door trim, red interior accents, plus more.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
Rear seating is very good for a compact sport coupe, and access is best-in-class. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

I could go into colour options and more, but considering this 2019 model is being replaced by the 2020 version while this review is being published, you’ll have to get what you can if wanting to avail model year-end discounts as well as 0-percent financing (the 2020 model was available with 0.99-percent financing at the time of writing). By the way, you can learn about these deals and more right here at CarCostCanada, where all trim, package and individual option prices are itemized, as well as manufacturer rebate info and otherwise hard to get dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

If you like the idea of the new Veloster but were hoping for more performance, you may also want to consider new N trim. It includes a new 2.0-litre turbo-four with 275 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque, and comes exclusively with a six-speed manual featuring downshift rev matching. An electronically controlled limited slip differential helps put the power down to the pavement, while an electronically controlled suspension support a big set of 19-inch alloys on 235/35 Pirelli summer-performance tires. Also included are Normal, Sport, N and Custom drive mode selections, while a driver-adjustable active exhaust system makes this ultimate Veloster even more exciting to drive. Even its fuel economy is decent at 10.6 L/100km city, 8.3 highway and 9.5 combined, while it starts at just $34,999.

2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo Tech
The Veloster’s cargo compartment is significantly larger for 2019. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Notable when comparing 2019 to 2020 Velosters, the new base model won’t be available with a manual transmission anymore, which will only cause performance purists and custom tuners to feel a bit miffed. This change causes the 2020 Veloster’s base price to go up by $1,400 to $22,399, with the cheapest manual now the $27,499 Turbo.

Also important to note, Hyundai has modified its trim naming scheme for 2020, eliminating the GL and Tech designations from the 2019 model while adding Preferred and Luxury to the 2020. The 2020 Veloster N remains a single-trim car for the same price, although those searching for it on CarCostCanada will need to choose it as a separate model from the regular Veloster line.

Whether opting for a 2019 or 2020 model, an old GL, Tech or N, or the new Preferred, Luxury or N trim, the new second-generation Veloster is a much more advanced car than its predecessor. It still combines an extremely sporty look with a very practical layout, but now mixes in stronger performance, newer electronics, and new features, resulting in one of the smartest urban runabouts currently available.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC Road Test

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Mitsubishi has made a bold move by entering an SUV-coupe into the mainstream market, but we like its new Eclipse Cross very much. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

What’s in a name? So much. I’m actually a tiny bit put off by Eclipse Cross, the name Mitsubishi is using for its new compact crossover SUV. There’s nothing particularly wrong with the two words chosen, unlike when Buick named one of their mid-size sedans after Canada’s national game that actually had another somewhat raunchy colloquial meaning in French, but it sends my mind back to a better (automotive) time when personal 2+2 sports coupes like the Japanese brand’s own Eclipse, Honda’s Prelude, Nissan’s 240SX, and Toyota’s Celica, amongst myriad others, were what many of us longed to cruise the strip in on Friday and Saturday nights before autocrossing on Sundays, but now all of these low-riding, two-door hardtops are gone, leaving us with a glut of two-box sport utilities. 

A few of these car-based crossovers are slightly more unusual, however, making this mostly practical market sector more intriguing than it might otherwise be, with the edgy new Eclipse Cross top of this category’s list of orthodox heretics. It’s a particularly good choice for buyers not requiring all of the Outlander’s cargo capacity yet wanting more get-up-and-go than an RVR, plus its sporty SUV-coupe design pulls some of the premium pizazz down from luxury juggernauts like BMW and Mercedes-Benz that offer similarly sized variants in their X4 and GLC Coupe models respectively. I’m not trying to say this commoner’s shuttle somehow measures up to such lofty Europeans, but it’s got a strut all its own and therefore deserves a level of respect for going its own way in a compact SUV class that’s more often than not safer than safe. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
It’s sloped rear roofline is joined by a very stylish combination of taillights and two rear windows. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Most brands that choose to get their funk on turn to the smallest subcompact SUV category to do so, where Mitsubishi pits its comparatively conservative RVR against more unusual entries such as the Kia Soul and Toyota C-HR (Nissan’s Juke, and before that the Cube, which was the oddest of them all, laid to rest a number of years ago, the latter replaced by the more mainstream Kicks), while, size aside, the Mazda CX-3 is closer to the Eclipse Cross as far as consumer acceptability and sporty driving dynamics go, but the larger Mitsu is the only SUV-coupe in its bigger compact segment. 

The Eclipse Cross reaches 4,405 mm (173.4 in) from nose to tail, with a 2,670 mm (105.1 in) wheelbase, while it stretches 1,805 mm (71.1 in) wide and stands 1,685 mm (66.3 in) tall. This makes its wheelbase identical to the brand’s Outlander that in fact measures 290 mm (11.4 in) longer overall, while its width is a mere 5 mm (0.2 in) thinner and height 25 mm (1.0 in) lower to the ground. This means it’s about the same size as the Outlander other than length, which combined with its sloped rear roof section, makes for a much more exciting looking SUV. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The 18-inch alloys are standard, but the LED headlamps are exclusive to this GT trim line. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As for styling, the Eclipse Cross wears Mitsubishi’s bold new “Dynamic Shield” design language rather well, better in my opinion than any other model in the lineup, other than the new 2020 RVR that takes this look to new heights. The drama continues around both sides where sculpted cutlines emerge about a third of the way through the front doors before slicing through the handles and meeting up with the lower edge of an even more enticing combination of LED tail lamps, these visually tied together by a narrow strip of lighting that separates two panes of back glass in similitude to Honda’s 2nd-generation (1988-1991) CRX or more recent (2011–2016) CR-Z, plus the Japanese brand’s defunct mid-size (2010–2015) Crosstour, although these three Hondas never included the Eclipse Cross’s light strip. Additional body sculpting along the rocker panels bends upward before rounding the rear fenders, these matching the Eclipse Cross’s muscular front fender design with a slight nod to the past (2004–2011) Endeavor mid-size crossover SUV, a long-term tester I had the pleasure of living with for more than a few months way back when. 

Framed behind a sharp looking set of standard 18-inch alloy rims on 225/55 all-season rubber is a fully independent MacPherson strut front suspension and multi-link rear setup incorporating stabilizer bars at each end, all of which combines for ample grip to keep its 1.5-litre turbo-four in control. The diminutive engine, good for 152 horsepower and 184 lb-ft of torque, sends its output through an innovative continuously variable transmission (CVT) complete with eight forward gears, or should I say simulated gears, shiftable via two of the best magnesium column-mounted paddles in the business. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
This three-part LED lighting element looks even better up close. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Why the best? Unlike most anything else in the entire industry, these longer than average paddle shifters are fixed to the steering column rather than the steering wheel, exactly like with the fabulous Evo X MR (RIP) and plenty of other Mitsubishi models, allowing accurate upshifts and downshifts even when the wheel is being turned. 

This Eclipse Cross GT moved along well when pushed hard, feeling more energetic than its horsepower rating led on, without doubt due to its sizeable torque figure. Steering effort was firmer than most other compact SUVs I’ve driven, although light enough for easy daily use, while its ride quality was a bit more rigid, yet never uncomfortable. Its firm stance helped amid tight twisting curves, the Eclipse Cross feeling rock solid when getting aggressive, but this said I wouldn’t have thought it would be as good as it is when running errands around town or otherwise driving normally, as the powertrain responds like it’s in eco mode even when it’s not. Yes, you can still press the green “Eco Mode” button on the centre console if you want an even more relaxed experience, plus the fuel savings to go with it. 

Unfortunately there’s no Sport mode, my right foot on the go-pedal the only way to extract all of the engine’s energy, and even with those aforementioned shift paddles the CVT isn’t the sportiest of transmissions (I’m being nice). It’s smooth, however, and therefore just what most buyers in this compact SUV class want, plus it’s very effective at moving this little utility down the road quickly while using as little gas as possible. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The Eclipse Cross provides a really well laid out cockpit. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

In the wet, much of the Eclipse Cross’s straight-line speed and cornering capability is directly due to its standard Super All-Wheel Control, those four words collectively designated to Mitsubishi’s all-wheel drive system, which is an advanced torque-vectoring AWD honed from decades of rally car racing. True, it’s difficult to accept that this “performance” SUV is now the sportiest model in Mitsubishi’s once very racy lineup that previously offered the superb Evo X noted earlier, an all-wheel drive super compact that easily out-handled the Subaru WRX STI of the era, but Mitsubishi’s focus has changed now, with practical SUVs front and centre, one of which is a plug-in electric that’s giving it a good green image if not much in the way of profits. 

Rather than cry over the Evo’s demise, it’s probably best to praise Mitsubishi for the Eclipse Cross’s fuel-efficiency. It’s rated at 9.6 L/100km city, 8.9 highway and 8.3 combined, which is good when compared to the segment-sales-leading Toyota RAV4 that can only manage 10.5 city, 8.3 highway and 9.5 combined, although it’s not quite as stingy on gas as the Honda CR-V’s estimated rating of 8.7 city, 7.2 highway and 8.0 combined. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The gauge cluster looks good and is easy to read in any light. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The previously noted turbocharged four-cylinder and CVT combination is identical no matter which of its three trim lines gets chosen (not including special editions), but like usual in this business Mitsubishi provided my Eclipse Cross tester in top-tier GT trim so I could experience all of its available goodies. This model hits the road for $35,998 plus freight and fees (check right here on CarCostCanada for all the pricing details, including dealer invoice pricing and rebate info that could save you thousands), and came well equipped with LED headlights, a head-up display unit, a multi-view rearview camera with active guidelines, an excellent 710-watt Rockford Fosgate Punch audio system featuring nine speakers including a 10-inch sub, a heated steering wheel, two-way heatable rear outboard seats, leather upholstery, a six-way power driver’s seat, a two-pane panoramic glass sunroof, plus more. 

This top-line GT also boasts everything from the mid-range SE trim’s available Tech Package, including auto high beams, adaptive cruise control, forward collision mitigation with pedestrian warning, lane departure warning, an auto-dimming rearview mirror with an integrated universal garage door remote, roof rails, and a stylish silver-painted lower door garnish. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Mitsubishi’s head-up display powers up out of the dash. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Items grandfathered up to GT trim from the just-noted SE include those paddle shifters mentioned earlier, plus proximity keyless entry and pushbutton start/stop, an electric parking brake (the base model uses a classic handbrake), a leather-clad steering wheel rim and shift knob, automatic headlamps, rain-sensing windshield wipers, two-zone auto HVAC (an upgrade from base trim’s single-zone automatic climate control), blind spot warning, etcetera for just $29,998, while items pulled up from $27,998 base ES trim include LED daytime running lights, fog lights, LED side mirror turn signals, LED tail lamps, a tilt and telescopic steering column, a colour multi-information display in the primary gauge package, the “ECO” mode mentioned a moment ago, micron-filtered auto climate control, two-way heatable front seats, plus more. 

Eclipse Cross interior quality is good, including a dash completely made from a premium-like pliable composite that bends all the way down to the middle portion of the instrument panel, while nice soft synthetic front door uppers add to the luxury feel, along with even plusher door inserts just below, and a comfortable set of armrests with contrast stitching. Their orange contrasting thread matches with the seat bolster stitching nicely, while all added colour is applied tastefully (unlike some in the compact SUV category). 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The infotainment system is excellent. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Mitsubishi has organized the primary instruments well, with an amply sized colour trip computer between its two conventional dials, while over on the centre stack its 7.0-inch centre display offers an upscale look. Tap, pinch and swipe finger prompts can be used in the usual smartphone/tablet-style touchscreen way, but that’s not all as Mitsubishi provides an impressive touchpad on the lower console for those who’d rather not reach all the way to the dash when entering commands. I’m impressed at this entry-level brand incorporating such a sophisticated infotainment system as standard equipment, its features and layout comparable to a number of premium SUVs on offer. 

Within the bright, graphical interface is standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, a big backup camera with active guidelines (my tester including an upgraded multi-view version), Bluetooth with audio streaming, satellite radio, two USB charging/connectivity ports, and more. 

The Eclipse Cross’s driver’s seat is comfortable, thanks to good powered adjustability. I was able to set up an ideal driving position due to ample rake and reach via the tilt and telescopic steering wheel, but alas the seatback didn’t include any adjustable lumbar support. Still, its ergonomically shaped design provided good lower back comfort anyway, although as I’ve experienced during countless road trips, the ability to make periodic seat adjustments so as to ease acquired pain is important. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Along with its touchscreen functionality, the infotainment system accepts finger prompts from this handy touchpad. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The steering wheel mentioned a moment ago is nicely designed with a reasonably thick leather rim, while the ability to heat it up was appreciated. The front seat heaters cooked up a storm too, but with just two temperature settings available I found my driver’s seat was either too hot or too cold, never just right. 

The second row of seats offers up a lot of space and comfort, plus it includes a flip-down armrest in the middle that integrates the usual set of cupholders. The rear seat heaters on the backside of the front console are an easy reach, while my test model’s rear glass sunroof joined up with this SUV’s ample visibility out the rear windows for a really open and airy experience in back. 

The Eclipse Cross doesn’t offer a powered tailgate, which wouldn’t matter to me personally, but something that would truly sway my vote would be more accommodating 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks than the 60/40 division provided, or at the very least a centre pass-through so I’d be able to load skis down the middle while my rear passengers enjoyed those previously mentioned seat warmers on our way back from the mountain, but for reasoning that can only come down to cost savings, only a couple of mainstream volume-branded rivals offer this premium-level convenience. Then again, it’s not like this new Mitsubishi breaks rank when it comes to cargo flexibility, yet the automaker may want to reconsider this because it could be a leader and therefore garner sales it hasn’t been able to thus far. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The driver’s seat is good, but it needs adjustable lumbar support. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Continuing on this practical train of thought, even this segment’s sportiest SUV has to measure up when it comes to hauling gear, so it’s good the Eclipse Cross provides plenty of luggage capacity to go along with its sizeable passenger compartment. By the numbers, the Eclipse Cross offers 640 litres (22.6 cu ft) aft of the rear seats, and 1,385 litres (48.9 cu ft) behind the front seats when the rear seatbacks are lowered, making it 26 litres (0.9 cubic feet) more voluminous for cargo than the subcompact RVR when both model’s rear seats are in use, albeit 17 litres (0.6 cubic feet) less so when those seatbacks are dropped down. Hence, the compromise of a sporty SUV-coupe compared to a more conventional crossover SUV. 

When comparing the Eclipse Cross to its bigger Outlander brother, which is closer in most external dimensions, it’s a full 328 litres (11.6 cubic feet) less accommodating behind its back row, and a whopping 407 litres (14.4 cubic feet) less so when both SUVs’ have their rear seatbacks lowered. Mitsubishi helpfully includes a removable cargo floor to expand on cargo space by unveiling a fairly large stowage compartment underneath. 

On the negative, when I pulled those rear seatbacks up so they could be used again, I found their headrests almost impossible to yank up from their deep-set lowered positions. It really took all of my strength, and while I’m no Charles Atlas, the level of effort needed bordered on the outrageous. I’m sure the headrest mounts would free up in time, but this presupposes that an owner is capable of pulling them up in the first place. I recommend you find out if you can do so even before going on a test drive, and also that Mitsubishi dealers make sure their service departments check this as part of their pre-delivery inspection regimen. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Love all the light shining from above. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Now that I’m griping, I experienced way too many annoying creaks and squeaks from the rear when underway. It’s possible this has something to do with the removable cargo floor noted earlier, but I doubt it. It’s more likely due to the fitment of the rear sunroof, or even more likely the rear seats, as some of the squeaking sounds seemed more like leather rubbing together. Therefore I’d really like to test the Eclipse Cross with its fabric seats, and find out just where all the noise is coming from. 

On a more positive note, I liked having separate power sunshade controls for both front and rear sunroofs, as it allowed rear passengers more overhead light while front occupants were shaded, or vice versa. 

Another thumbs up goes to the rear wiper that engages automatically when reversing if the windshield wipers are on, while the previously noted head-up display (HUD) was a helpful tool being that it provides key info directly in front of the driver where it can be seen easily without taking eyes off the road. Rather than projecting images directly on the windshield, which is the usual way an HUD works, Mitsubishi’s design is near identical to the HUD used by Mazda, in that a small transparent plastic reflector screen powers up atop the instrument hood, but the only problem with the Eclipse Cross version is that it’s somewhat distracting. It doesn’t really block the view ahead, but it kind of interrupts the mind’s eye. I did get used to it after a few days, to the point that it didn’t bother me at all, but I could understand if some others didn’t like it. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Rear seat roominess is good and the backrests are comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

After pointing out the various Eclipse Cross positives and negatives that you may or may not agree with, I think we can all commend Mitsubishi for its industry-leading 5-year or 100,000-km basic (almost bumper-to-bumper) warranty and 10-year or 160,000-km powertrain coverage. No other manufacturer comes close to providing as much peace of mind, with the majority providing 2 years or 40,000 km less basic coverage, and 5 years or 60,000 km less powertrain warranty. This, and the fact that Mitsubishi is one of the more well respected automakers in global markets due to superb engineering and better than average dependability, makes its excellent warranty a top selling point that every consumer should factor in when purchasing a new vehicle. 

Mitsubishi should also be commended for creating the Eclipse Cross’s compact SUV-coupe niche within its mainstream volume-branded class. True, the model’s year-to-date 2019 sales figure of 4,159 units (as of Sept 2019) leave it dead last in its segment, but when combining that number with Mitsubishi’s second-to-last Outlander sales of 8,568 units, its 12,727-unit overall brand impact on the compact SUV segment positions it above Subaru, GMC and Kia; an impressive accomplishment for one of Canada’s newest automotive brands (Mitsubishi Motor Sales was established here in 2002). 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Most won’t mind the load hauling compromise, but the rear headrests are really hard to adjust. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This, combined with the Outlander PHEV, the only plug-in hybrid in the volume-branded compact SUV segment, shows that innovation remains a key component to Mitsubishi’s continued market presence and future growth, and despite some of us lamenting the loss of performance-first models like that Evo mentioned earlier, or the Eclipse sports coupe this crossover SUV pays tribute to, we need to acknowledge Bob Dylan’s famous line, the times they are a changin, and appreciate that only those willing to adapt will survive when times get tough. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

New 2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet just in time for winter

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The 2020 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet is a true all-season convertible. (Photo: Porsche)

This winter will be “colder than normal,” says The Old Farmer’s Almanac in this year’s Annual Weather Summary for Southern British Columbia, while “temperatures, precipitation, and snowfall will be above normal” in Southern Ontario. 

Yikes! Ready for the dark days of winter yet? Anyone with a reasonably good memory will get a chill when thinking back to the past two winter seasons, while February of 2019 was Vancouver’s coldest on record ever. Now, early storms are already rearing their ugly heads across Canada, bringing these bitter memories back earlier than expected, but you won’t need to concern yourself about getting around if you ante up for Porsche’s all-new redesigned 2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé or 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The new Carrera 4 sports rectangular tailpipes for a unique look. (Photo: Porsche)

The Stuttgart-based performance/luxury brand has been introducing its fresh new 911 throughout the year, and its latest Carrera 4 models couldn’t have timed their arrival better. Using the identical 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged six-cylinder “boxer” engine as found in the new Carrera 2, making 370 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque, the new Carrera 4 Coupe blasts from standstill to 100 km/h a scant 0.1 seconds faster than the Carrera 2 at just 4.5 seconds when shifted by its seven-speed manual transmission, or 4.3 seconds when mated up to its paddle-shift infused eight-speed PDK gearbox. Even better, the Carrera 4 can accomplish the same feat in a mere 4.1 seconds when Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package enhances the dual-clutch automated transmission. 

Furthermore, only 9.7 seconds is required to zip from zero to 160 km/h with the manual gearbox, or 9.3 seconds for the PDK, while the two model respectively top out at 292 and 290 km/h. If the convertible is your thing, the new Carrera 4 Cabriolet takes just 0.2 seconds longer to achieve each timed exercise, while its top speed is a lofty 289 km/h. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
Fabulous looking new Carrera 4 Coupé is even more stable in inclement weather than the previous generation. (Photo: Porsche)

Identical to the 2020 Carrera 4S released earlier this year, the redesigned Carrera 4 features a new water-cooled front differential, which includes reinforced clutches that increase load capacity and durability. Together with Porsche Traction Management (PTM), the new front axle drive system enhances the Carrera 4’s grip in slippery situations, while also improving performance in dry conditions. 

Additionally, all 2020 911 Carrera buyers get an innovative new Wet mode as part of the upgraded steering wheel-mounted driving mode selector. The smart technology automatically maintains greater control over slippery road surfaces when turned on, while all new 911 trims improve safety further via standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection, while a high-resolution rearview camera plus rear parking assist come standard too. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The new 911 incorporates all of Porsche’s most advanced electronics. (Photo: Porsche)

Also standard, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) improves high-speed handling thanks to electronically variable dampers with both Normal and Sport settings, while Porsche Torque Vectoring, which comes standard with the pricier S and 4S, is now offered as optional equipment when ordering the new Carrera 4 Coupe and Cabriolet. 

Other features include the optional Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system, plus staggered front and rear 20- and 21-inch alloy rims, while staggered 19- and 20-inch alloy wheels come standard. 

As for exterior styling, you’ll have a difficult time trying to spot a Carrera 4 when it’s driving toward you, but you might catch its italicized “4” on the rear deck lid when it passes you by, or alternatively see if two rectangular tailpipes have replaced the base model’s twin oval tips. This isn’t an exact science, however, as it’s possible for Carrera 4 customers to purchase an available set of dual oval exhaust pipes, but take note if a quad of round ports are filling out the 911’s lower rear apron it’s a Carrera 2S or 4S. Got that? 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
These redesigned sport seats, standard with both Carrera 2 and Carrera 4 models, are classic Porsche designs. (Photo: Porsche)

This said nothing is so obviously unique inside either 911 Carrera 2 or 4. Both models arrive standard with the German brand’s almost entirely digital primary gauge cluster, with only its classic analogue tachometer at centre, while the new 10.9-inch Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen infotainment interface fills the top portion of the centre stack, featuring enhanced connectivity no less. Hardly last on an extensive list of standard features, both 911 Carreras feature the same reportedly comfortable and supportive redesigned seats. 

The fresh new 2020 Porsche Carrera 4 Coupé is now available to order from $111,900, plus freight and fees, as is the Carrera 4 Cabriolet, start at $126,000. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche adds 670 hp plug-in hybrid drivetrain to 2020 Cayenne and Cayenne Coupe

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The new 670-hp Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid can sprint from 0-100km/h in just 3.6 seconds. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche introduced its completely redesigned third-generation Cayenne for model year 2018, and as is normally the case for the Stuttgart, Germany-headquartered luxury brand, has been continually expanding the mid-size crossover SUV line with new trim levels ever since. 

From the modest yet still energetic 335 horsepower base V6 up to the rip-roaring 541 horsepower Turbo, with the 434 horsepower Cayenne S and 455 net horsepower Cayenne E-Hybrid plug-in in between, the Cayenne portfolio is wide and diverse, but now, taking its cue from last year’s Panamera, Porsche is about to add a much more formidable 670 net horsepower (541 hp from the Internal Combustion Engine/ICE and 134 hp from the electric motor) Turbo S E-Hybrid model to its mid-size SUV lineup. 

The premium brand’s performance-tuned eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic gearbox comes as standard equipment, as does the Porsche Traction Management (PTM) active all-wheel drive system with an electronically variable, map-controlled multi-plate clutch, plus an automatic brake differential (ABD) and anti-slip regulation (ASR). 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
Both the conventional Cayenne and the new Cayenne Coupe can be had in Turbo S E-Hybrid trim. (Photo: Porsche)

The new plug-in hybrid powertrain will be the top-level trim on the regular Cayenne as well as the new Cayenne Coupe, the latter (in lesser trims) expected to arrive at Porsche Canada dealerships soon, and along with heaps of electrified and twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 horsepower it makes a shocking 663 lb-ft of combined torque (567 lb-ft from the ICE and 295 lb-ft from the electric motor), making the new model capable of blasting from zero to 100 km/h in just 3.8 seconds with its standard Sport Chrono Package, or 3.6 seconds with its available Lightweight Sport Package, all ahead of achieving a terminal velocity of 295 km/h (183.3 mph). 

Being that it’s a plug-in hybrid (PHEV), the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid’s completely charged 14.1 kWh battery is reportedly good for zero-local-emissions commutes and errand runs over short durations thanks to a maximum EV range of about 40 kilometres. The lithium-ion battery, which hides below the cargo compartment floor, takes a mere 6 hours to fully recharge when connected to a 230-volt Level 2 household charging station, but Porsche claims that a 400-volt supercharger is capable of reducing charge times to only 2.4 hours. 

Additionally, owners can download a smartphone app that can remotely monitor the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid’s charging process, plus the same app can pre-condition the auto climate control system and other features before the owner returns, similarly to how a remote engine start system can do likewise, but the Cayenne PHEV app only utilizes the battery for ancillary power, rather than the gasoline-portion of the SUV’s powertrain. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid needs just 2.4 hours to completely recharge on a 400-volt supercharger. (Photo: Porsche)

Those not yet familiar with Porsche’s all-new Cayenne Coupe should know that it gets a 20-millimetre roofline drop featuring a reworked front windshield framed within a shallower set of A pillars, plus much more tapered rear side windows, completely remoulded rear side doors, redesigned rear quarter panels, and a new rear bumper, with the latter composite panel also getting a new integrated license plate holder. This results in a small 19-mm (0.7-inch) increase to overall width, which when combined together with its just-noted lower ride height makes for an even more aggressive stance than the regular Cayenne. 

A few more Cayenne Coupe improvements include a special adaptive rear spoiler, individual rear bucket-style sport seats divided by a shallow centre console storage bin, and a standard 2.16-cubic-metre fixed glass panoramic moonroof that can be cloaked from sunlight by an integrated roller-type shade, or optionally the roof panel can be made from lightweight carbon-fibre. 

The all-new 2020 Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid, which is available to order now with deliveries expected early next year, will set you back another $40,400 over the already pricey 2019 Cayenne Turbo, at $182,200 plus freight and fees, this more than twice the price of a base 2019 Cayenne that’s available from only $76,700. As for the new Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe, its $187,100 retail price is $39,100 loftier than the 2019 Cayenne Turbo Coupe, and likewise is more than double that of the $86,400 base Cayenne Coupe. Interestingly, both Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid and Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe perform identically.  

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The new Cayenne’s interior is beautifully crafted from some of the industry’s best materials. (Photo: Porsche)

Incidentally, you can find detailed 2020 Porsche Cayenne pricing right here on CarCostCanada, including its various trims, packages and individual options, plus you can also save big by learning about available rebates and even source dealer invoice pricing that could keep thousands more in your wallet. 

If you want to get your hands on either new Porsche model, make sure to contact your local dealer as quickly as possible, and while you’re waiting make sure to enjoy the sole video the German automaker provided below. 

 

The new Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé: A master of balance (1:00):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche