CarCostCanada

Subaru gives its 2022 BRZ a total redesign with more power

2022 Subaru BRZ
What do you think of Subaru’s new 2022 BRZ?

The 1960s and early ‘70s was the era of cheap, affordable sports cars, with today’s entry-level offerings few and far between. Fortunately for car enthusiasts, our Japanese friends haven’t given up on the sportiest market yet, with Subaru having finally silenced doomsayers projecting the demise of the BRZ and its Toyota 86 clone, by introducing the fully redesigned second-generation coupe.

Currently, every BRZ/86 competitor is Japanese except for Fiat’s 124 Spider that’s based on Mazda MX-5 underpinnings (powertrain excluded), which is like overhearing Japanese spoken with an Italian accent while eating cannelloni flavoured sushi (hmmm… that might actually be good), and while today’s Nissan 370Z can be bought for a song in its most basic form, chances of a $30k 400Z are unlikely. For those not requiring as much forward thrust in order to have a good time, mind you, the upcoming 2022 BRZ could be the ideal answer.

2022 Subaru BRZ
While the details have completely changed, the BRZ’s basic layout and purpose remains.

The completely reengineered Subie will arrive with more power, however, bumping engine performance up from 205 horsepower and 156 lb-ft of torque to 228 horsepower and 184 lb-ft, which is an increase of 23 and 28 respectively. That won’t placate grumblers vying for the WRX STI’s 310-hp mill, or even the regular WRX’ 268 hp, but it’s respectable for this class.

The increased power comes from a new naturally aspirated 2.4-litre horizontally opposed four-cylinder, which is 400 cubic centimetres larger than the outgoing 2.0-litre powerplant. No turbo is attached, but keep in mind this is the same basic engine as used for the mid-size Legacy, Outback and three-row Ascent SUV, which with turbocharger attached makes of 260 horsepower and 277 pound-feet of torque. Therefore, a more potent performance model is once again possible for Subaru or mechanics with tuning chops.

2022 Subaru BRZ
What about those taillights? Can anyone else see some Acura NSX influence here?

More important than straight-line power in this category is low mass, and to Subaru’s credit only 7.7 kilograms (17 lbs) were added to this larger and more technologically advanced car, the 2022 BRZ weighing in at 1,277 kg (2,815 lbs) in base trim. Exterior measurements increase by 25 mm (1 in) to 4,265 mm (167.9 in) from nose to tail, while the 2,575-mm (101.4-in) wheelbase has only increased by 5 mm (0.2 in).

The change is the result of its Subaru Global Platform-sourced body structure, which makes the new model 50 percent stiffer than the old BRZ. In a press release, Subaru claims that key areas of strengthening included “a reinforced chassis mounting system, sub-frame architecture and other connection points,” while the car’s front lateral bending rigidity is now 60-percent more rigid, saying to “improve turn-in and response.”

2022 Subaru BRZ
More power, a near identical curb weight, and suspension improvements should make the new BRZ a serious performer.

Despite all the upgrades, the BRZ’s general suspension layout stays the same, with front struts and a double-wishbone setup in back, but the new model gets updates aplenty nevertheless, and now rolls on standard 17-inch alloy wheels with 18-inch rims optional, wearing 215/45R17 and 215/40R18 rubber respectively.

As was the case with the outgoing BRZ, a short-throw six-speed manual transmission will come standard with the 2022 model, while the same six-speed automatic with steering wheel paddles and downshift rev-matching is part of the 2022 package too. A standard limited-slip differential remains standard issue for the new BRZ too, so hooking up all that power won’t be an issue.

2022 Subaru BRZ
Like the exterior, the new BRZ’s interior is completely redesigned.

Performance aside, what do you think of the new look? So far, critics have been mostly positive, appreciating the 2022 model’s more aggressive character lines, while the interior has received universal praise. Yes, the current car has aged reasonably well, but it’s been nearly a decade so any modernization would likely be an improvement. Along with a complete instrument panel redesign, a 7.0-inch digital colour display has been integrated within the all-new primary gauge cluster, while over on the centre stack is a new 8.0-inch touchscreen housing Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration, plus the usual assortment of entertainment and information functions.

2022 Subaru BRZ
This looks like a very good place to spend time, whether on the road or track.

Even with all the 2022 upgrades, no one is expecting a major BRZ price increase, but you probably won’t be able to snag the current 2020 model’s $3,000 worth of incentives when the new car rolls out. Obviously, Subaru is trying to make today’s BRZ too good to pass up, and for those who still love the outgoing model it might be a good idea to grab one at a discounted price while you can. Visit CarCostCanada’s 2020 Subaru BRZ Canada Prices page to learn more, and also be sure to find out how their affordable program can save you thousands off your next car purchase via learning about manufacturer rebates when available, special factory financing and leasing deals, as well as dealer invoice pricing that makes the usual negotiation dog and pony show hassle free. Be sure to download the free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store and Google Play Store too.

Also, enjoy the three videos Subaru provided below:

The 2022 Subaru BRZ Global Reveal (5:54):

The 2022 Subaru BRZ. Sports Car Purity, Subaru DNA (2:11):

Scott Speed Test Drives All-New 2022 Subaru BRZ (4:33):

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Subaru

CarCostCanada

Nissan’s new Z car concept looks ready for production

2020 Nissan Z Proto
Nissan’s new Z Proto has the sports car world buzzing with anticipation. Will the production version share this concept’s styling? We think so.

Let’s face it. The current Z car is old. How old? In automotive years, ancient. In fact, it’s oldest design currently being offered in North America. The only older vehicles include a truck and a commercial van, the former being Nissan’s own Frontier and the latter GM’s Chevy/GMC Express/Savana cargo and shuttle vans. This said, there’s new hope on the horizon.

Nissan recently took the wraps off of a new concept car dubbed Z Proto, and while “Proto” obviously stands for prototype, it appears as close to production trim as any fantasy show car the Japanese brand has ever revealed.

2020 Nissan Z Proto
The the Z Proto’s frontal design pulls plenty of styling cues from the original 240Z, its rear appears influenced by the groundbreaking second-gen (Z32) 300ZX.

It’s sheet metal actually looks picture perfect for a seventh-generation Z, combining many of the original 240’s design cues with some from the much-loved fourth-generation Z32, while its slick looking interior is as dramatically modern as the current model is as awkward and backwards, yet comes infused with plenty of retro touches.

As is almost always the case, new Z will be larger than the outgoing model is this prototype is anything to go by, with the Z Proto measuring about five and a half inches longer from nose to tail. This doesn’t necessarily mean it will weigh more than the 370’s base 3,232 lb (1,466 kg) curb mass, or lose any of the current car’s driving capability, but more likely due to greater use of modern lightweight materials and the inclusion of a smaller 3.0-litre engine block, down 700 cubic centimeters, will actually weigh less.

2020 Nissan Z Proto
Just like the front end, the Z Proto’s side profile reminds of the much-loved 240Z and ’70s-era 260Z/280Z models that followed.

The new Z will once again share platform architectures with its pricier Infiniti Q60 cousin, which bodes well for its overall structural integrity and build quality. The new prototype now reaches 4,381 mm (172.5 in) from front to back, which is exactly 141 mm (5.6 in) longer than the current 370Z, but take note it’s actually a fraction of a fraction narrower (1 mm) at 1,849 mm (72.8 in), or identical to the Q60’s width, and 10 mm (0.4 in) lower at 1,310 mm (51.6 in).

The current Z uses a lot of aluminum already, so expect the upcoming version to also use the lightweight alloy for its hood, door skins, and rear liftback, while it will without doubt also utilize aluminum suspension components and an aluminum-alloy front subframe, engine cradle, plus forged aluminum control arms (upper and lower in the rear), steering knuckle, radius rod, and wheel carrier assembly, all found on the current car, which is beyond impressive for its $30,498 base price.

See the similarities? Of course they were intentional, the 240Z one of the most adored “affordable” classic collectibles ever.

As you may have guessed from the engine noted above, the new Z will feature Nissan/Infiniti’s award-winning twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre VR30DDTT V6, which not only improved on performance, but makes a big difference at the pump over today’s 3.7-litre mill. The current Q60 offers both 300 and 400 horsepower versions, the latter causing many in the industry to dub the next-gen sports car 400Z, but this said it would be a shame not to offer a more affordable variant named 300Z, especially considering the model’s much-loved and sought after 1989–2000 second-generation (Z32) 300ZX. This tact would allow the Z car to be sold in a similar fashion to Porsche’s 911, with various stages of tune from the 300 horsepower 300Z, to a 350 hp 350Z, possibly a 370 hp 370Z and top-line 400Z. Who knows? Maybe there’s a market for a lower-powered $30k Z car to compete head-on with the upcoming redesigned 2022 Toyota 86 and Subaru BRZ. That car will be available with a 2.5-litre H-4 making 228 hp and 184 lb-ft of torque, so 240 hp turbo-four under the hood of a Z car would make a nice rival, wouldn’t it? Can’t imagine what they might call it. I think Nissan would have a lot of fun bringing out special editions of that engine with 20 hp bumps in performance. Of course, we’re only speculating, but hopefully Nissan has something like this in mind as it would be marketing genius (if we don’t say so ourselves).

2020 Nissan Z Proto
The Z Proto’s hood and grille are heavily influenced by the original 240Z, while even its LED headlamps appear to be trying to combine the circular design of earlier models with the flush lenses from the Z32 300ZX.

Of course, rear-biased all-wheel drive will be optional if not standard, and a six-speed manual will probably get the cut in the base car, with at least seven forward gears in the optional automatic version.

The Proto’s interior comes fitted with the manual, incidentally, while anyone familiar with any Z car cabin would immediately know that it’s a modernized version of Nissan’s most revered sports car. Along with trademark giveaways like the trio of dials across the centre dash top and the sloping side windows, not to mention the classic Nissan sport steering wheel with its big stylized “Z” on the hub, this prototype pulls from the current 370Z’s parts bin with respect to the ovoid door handles, their integrated air vents, and the side window defog vents on each corner of its dash. These similarities may end up only being found on this prototype, and used for the sake of expediency and cost cutting, but it is possible Nissan will carry some less critical features such as these forward into the new interior design.

2020 Nissan Z Proto
Who doesn’t like this classic nod to the past?

Today’s 370Z is actually quite refined inside, at least in upper trims, with plenty of leather-like, padded, soft-touch surfaces with stitching on the dash, centre console sides and doors, all of which appear to be carried forward into the new concept. It’s likely Nissan will likely upgrade some other areas that are now covered in hard composite, the new car probably featuring more pliable synthetics in key areas that might be touched more often.

2020 Nissan Z Proto
Does this cabin look familiar? Basically today’s Z with some fabulous electronic updates.

The so far unmentioned elephant in the room (or cabin) is the impressive array of high-definition electronic interfaces, the primary gauges shown being fully digital and very intriguing, plus the centre stack-mounted infotainment touchscreen display appearing amongst the best Nissan currently has on offer. We can expect all the latest tech such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, a large rearview camera with potential an overhead, surround-view option, and this being a performance model, sport features such as a lap timer, g-meter, etcetera.

The centre stack also shows a simple triple-dial automatic HVAC interface that oddly doesn’t include dual-zone functionality, so it’s likely this was merely pulled over from the current car and will be updated in the future production Z.

2020 Nissan Z Proto
The Z Proto’s seats look good, and likely get sourced from Recaro like some of the current Z’s do.

Speaking of today’s 370Z, it can now be had with up to $1,000 in additional incentives, as shown on our 2020 Nissan 370Z Coupe Canada Prices page (or the 2020 Nissan 370Z Roadster Canada Prices page), which is a really good deal considering its aforementioned base price. And before you pick up that phone or drive down to your local Nissan dealership to negotiate, make sure to become a member of CarCostCanada first, so you can access benefits like manufacturer rebate information, updates about various brands’ in-house leasing and financing deals, plus of course dealer invoice pricing that could keep thousands in your pocket. Find out how our CarCostCanada system works, and make sure to download our free CarCostCanada app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store, so you can have all of this critical info with you when you need it most, at the dealership.

Lastly, be sure to watch Nissan’s trio of Z Proto videos below, because if this concept is anything to go by, we’re in for a real treat when the production model arrives.

Unleash the #PowerOfZ (2:18):

Hear the Z Proto roar (0:33):

Get ready for the Nissan Z Proto (0:29):

Photo credits: Nissan

CarCostCanada

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo Road Test

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The 370Z still looks awesome after all these years, especially in top-line Nismo trim.

Seen the new Z yet? The Z Proto (photo below) was introduced just a month ago, and while it might not yet be in full production trim, the car’s amazing attention to detail, particularly inside, makes it look very close to reality. So, where does that leave the current 370Z?

Let’s just call it a modern-day classic to be nice. Today’s Z is in fact the oldest generation of any car currently on the market, having been with us for over 11 years. The only non-commercial vehicle to beat that seasoned tenure is Nissan’s own Frontier pickup truck with 16 years to its credit, while GM’s full-size Chevy Express and GMC Savana commercial cargo/passenger vans are oldest of all, having dawned in 1995 and been refreshed in 2003. While old doesn’t necessarily mean bad, much has been learned in the decades that have passed, and therefore each could certainly be a lot better.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
An oldie but a goodie, the Z’s rear end design has always been aggressively good looking.

On the positive, this is the Z car’s 50th anniversary, and while I wish I had a special 50th Anniversary model to show you, complete with big, bold, diagonal side stripes, the Nismo is the best of the 2020 370Z crop, so I can hardly complain. To be clear, the anniversary car doesn’t provide the Nismo’s 18 additional horsepower and 6 extra pound-feet of torque, being limited to 332 and 270 respectively, instead of 350 and 276, but you can get it with the available paddle-shift actuated seven-speed automatic, the Nismo only available with a six-speed manual. Then again, it could be considered a moral crime to purchase the most potent version of this car with an autobox anyway.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Nismo upgrades look even better under close scrutiny.

Under the 370Z’s aluminum hood is a 3.7-litre V6 with a sensational looking red engine cover and an equally exciting reinforced three-point front strut tower brace hovering over top. Nissan should rightly celebrate this potent and dependable six-cylinder mill, and fortunately has provided an engine bay worthy of exposure at weekend parking lot car enthusiast meet-and-greets.

It doesn’t cost a lot to do it right, by the way, the base 370Z coming in at just $30,498, which is a hair over the much less powerful Toyota 86. Rather than get pulled into a comparison, which is oh-so easy with these two, I need to quickly point out that no amount of OEM options or packages can push the little Toyota sport coupe’s price up to my 370Z Nismo’s $48,998 MSRP.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The wheels might be worth the Nismo upgrade alone.

For that money the 2020 Z gets some unique red and black trim accents around the its circumference, plus really attractive 19-inch Nismo Rays forged rims surrounded by a set of 245/40YR19 front and 285/35YR19 rear Dunlop SP Sport MAXX GT600 performance rubber, not to mention a Nismo-tuned suspension featuring increased spring, dampening and stabilizer rates, front and rear performance shocks, a rear underbody V-brace, and the reinforced three-point front strut tower brace noted a moment ago. Oh, and that engine sends its wasted gas through a Nismo-tuned free-flow dual exhaust system with an H-pipe configuration.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Despite its years, the 370Z’s interior is remarkably refined.

As awesome as all that sounds, the 370Z Nismo’s black leather and perforated red Alcantara Recaro sport seats will probably get noticed first, especially because of the racing-style five-point harness slots on their backrests. There’s no shortage of red thread around the cabin either, and special Nismo logos elsewhere, such as the gauge cluster.

Plenty of comfort and convenience features get pulled up from lower trims, too, a few worth mentioning including automatic on/off HID headlights, LED daytime running lights, LED tail lamps, proximity-sensing entry with push-button start and stop, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror that houses a tiny reverse monitor for the backup camera, a HomeLink garage door opener, micro-filtered single-zone automatic climate control, a navigation system with detailed mapping and SiriusXM NavTraffic capability, a great sounding Bose audio system with available satellite radio, a USB charging port, etcetera.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The 370Z isn’t quite as much of a throwback as a Morgan, but it certainly offers up some classic touches.

If we put age aside, this 2020 370Z Nismo looks like an excellent value proposition. After all, when compared directly to key rivals from Toyota, the fully-loaded $34,450 86 GT only makes 205 horsepower on its best day, while the 382-horsepower turbocharged BMW 3.0-litre inline-six-powered Supra (I’d love to be living with that car out of warranty, not) will set you back a cool $67,690. Certainly, you can get a BMW-sourced 2.0-litre turbo four in the new Supra instead, but even that 255-hp mill is much pricier than the Z at $56,390.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Love the analogue gauges, but the orange dot-matrix displays are an acquired taste.

The top-line Supra can be launched from standstill to 100 km/h in the low to mid four-second range, which is a considerable improvement over the 370Z Nismo’s high four-second to low five-second sprint time. The 86 hits 100 km/h in the mid seven-second range, and tops out at just 226 km/h (140 mph), not that any sane person would ever try that on a Canadian road. Still, bragging rights are bragging rights, allowing owners of straight-six-powered Supras to boast about its 263 km/h (163 mph) terminal velocity, which is plenty of fun until the guy standing in front of his 370Z Nismo at the aforementioned meet-and-greet mentions his comparatively geriatric rival maxes out at 286 km/h (178 mph), a whopping 23 km/h (15 mph) faster.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Cool retro ancillary gauges are joined by a not so cool retro touchscreen display.

Of course, it’s not all about straight-line power. Anyone who’s spent time in a fast car knows that braking performance matters a lot more than acceleration, but don’t worry, Nissan has stopping power covered too. Up front, 14- by 1.3-inch vented rotors get the bite from four-piston opposed aluminum calipers, while the 13.8- by 0.8-inch rear discs are bound via two-piston calipers. Zs also receive high-rigidity brake hoses and R35 Special II brake fluid. The brakes are so strong, in fact, that I recommend doing so in a straight line when needing to scrub speed off quickly, because the Z’s 1,581 kilograms (3,486 lbs) of heft has been known to make its rear end a bit squirrely when getting hard on the binders mid-corner. I’ve experienced this myself, one time becoming especially uncomfortable just ahead Laguna Seca’s famed Corkscrew, and you don’t want to enter that one sideways.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
More of this for the next-gen Z please…

Fortunately, getting out of trouble fast is Z car hallmark, the current 370’s double-wishbone front suspension and four-link rear setup being wonderfully balanced most of the time. It gets stiffer roll calibrations and increased damping levels in Nismo trim, plus a 0.6-inch wider track, yet drives quite smoothly nonetheless. All Z’s utilize a carbon-fibre driveshaft to shave off pounds and improve throttle response, plus a viscous limited slip differential for putting power down to the ground via both rear tires.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
There’s nothing inherently wrong with the Z’s infotainment touchscreen, it just looks old, is a bit slow and lacks some features.

If you think all of this sounds good, and it should, wait until you’ve downshifted with the Z’s SynchroRev Match equipped six-speed manual that automatically blips the throttle mid-shift to match the upcoming gear ratio. You’ll be sounding like you’re a pro at heel-toe shifting, when you might not even know what I’m talking about. More importantly, SynchroRev Match ideally makes sure that shifts transition smoothly, thus minimizing drivetrain jolt. The shifter feels great too, thanks to a nice and tight, notchy feel and engaging response, while the clutch take-up is smooth yet engaging, and the arrangement of all aluminum pedals is great for the aforementioned heel-toe technique.

As you might expect in a modern sports car, there’s much more aluminum to go around than just the foot pedals, with plenty of bright and brushed metalwork elsewhere in the cabin. Then again, calling the Z a modern sports car is giving it much more respect than it deserves, particularly with respect to the interior’s design and execution. Its red on black colour theme is nice enough, but even this top-tier Nismo variant almost makes the 86 seem fresh.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Gripe all I want about the infotainment system, these old-timer controls work well.

Don’t get me wrong, because the Alcantara seat and door inserts are pretty plush, as are the same faux-suede armrests and lower centre stack sides, not to mention the nicely padded stitched leatherette dash top and door uppers. More contrast red stitched leather-like material flows around the shifter, and not just the boot. In fact, Nissan dresses up the top surface of the lower console in what comes across like leather, giving it some of the Maxima’s premium flair.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Again, the 370Z uses classic Nissan controllers for the audio and HVAC systems.

Even the sportiest Maxima SR doesn’t come close to offering seats as completely enveloping as the 370Z Nismo’s, their aggressive side bolstering and shoulder harness holes nodding to the car’s track potential and their maker, Recaro, renowned for producing some of the best performance seats in the business. They’re manually eight-way adjustable to save weight (the passenger gets four adjustments), and while the side dials aren’t as easy to modulate as levers, they’re infinitely adjustable and remain steadfast once set. While this is good, not providing any telescoping reach from the steering column is a massive fail, especially for those of us with longer legs than torso. The result is a need to crank the seatback into an almost 90-degree angle to comfortably and safely grip the steering wheel, which while the ideal position for the track isn’t exactly the most enjoyable on the road.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
There’s a lot to like about the 370Z’s six-speed gearbox, and the nicely finished console that surrounds it.

Now that I’m griping (and you’d expect complaints about an interior that’s into its third decade), the 370Z’s electronic interfaces are downright archaic. I have zero quibbles about the analogue gauge cluster, because I happen to love analogue dials for cars and watches, being a bit of a throwback myself, the car’s trio of ancillary gauges atop the dash one of its most loved design details. I even appreciate the digital clock that harks back to my teenage era, my watch collection including a few these as well, but modern it’s not. The multi-information display left of the tachometer is more of a simple trip computer that’ll have old-school PC users conjuring up memories of pre-Windows MS-DOS video games like Digger and Diamond Caves, not to mention the unusual rows of orange dots above and below for the respective fuel gauge and engine temp. It’s so old that it’s almost cool… almost.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Fabulous Recaro sport seats are a 370Z Nismo highlight.

In comparison the Z’s main infotainment touchscreen is mind-blowingly advanced, but of course it’s rather dated compared to most anything else currently on the market. Navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity, and other function are included, but its graphics are yesteryear, processing speed lethargic, and display resolution quality only slightly more up-to-date than the car itself. It all works well enough, nonetheless, so if you can live with merely adequate electronics, or don’t mind swapping them out for an aftermarket alternative, they’ll do fine.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Cargo space? Don’t expect much practicality in this class.

Of course, this being a two-seat sports coupe, the 370Z isn’t big on cargo capacity either. You can stuff enough bags for a weekend getaway for sure, but the 195 litres (6.9 cu ft) on hand won’t allow for much more. Again, compromises are always required when opting for such a track-ready sports car, so consider this a simple reminder.

On the positive, Nissan is currently offering up to $1,000 in additional incentives on the 2020 370Z, so make sure to check out our 2020 Nissan 370Z Coupe Canada Prices page for more. On that note, a CarCostCanada membership also provides information on available manufacturer rebates, manufacturer leasing and financing deal info, and last but hardly least, dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. Learn how the CarCostCanada system works, and remember to download our free app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store so you can have all of this critical information with you when haggling over your next vehicle purchase.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The 370Z Nismo is stunning under the hood.

In summary, you can get into a new 2020 370Z for less than $30,000, and while not as fancy or powerful as this Nismo variant, it comes reasonably close and you won’t lose as much when driving off the lot. Either way you’ll get a fantastic performance car with a reasonably refined interior, just not a very modern one. If you’re fine with that, it’s hard to beat the base 370Z’s starting price.

 

Review and photos: Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

Porsche announces new 2021 911 Turbo with pricing and specs

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
As beautiful as it is powerful, the new 911 Turbo is here sporting 572 horsepower.

We’ve all been waiting for it. Now Porsche’s 911 Turbo has been officially unveiled and is available to order as a 2021 model, with deliveries expected later this year.

The 2021 911 Turbo fills one of two holes in Porsche’s lineup between the 911 Carrera S and 911 Turbo S, with the newest generation 911 GTS, which will slot in just below the Turbo, still awaiting official announcement.

Last April the 911 Turbo S was announced first, and considering the output of its 3.8-litre horizontally opposed engine is a staggering 640 horsepower it might at first seem as if the advent of the new Turbo becomes less eventful. Still, the non-S variant’s near identical flat-six has the highest output of any Turbo in history at 572 horsepower, and being that many more Porschephiles will purchase the much more affordable version it remains the more significant new model launch.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
Even those this is an all-new model with no body panel remaining the same as the previous 2019 911 Turbo, it’s unmistakably a Porsche.

Of note, the new 911 Turbo makes 32 more horsepower than its 2019 predecessor, not to mention 30 lb-ft of extra torque for a total of 553 lb-ft. That allows it to blast past 100 km/h in just 2.8 seconds with the optional Sport Chrono Package added onto its slightly lighter Coupe body style, or 2.9 seconds from zero to hero in the Cabriolet. Both times are 0.2 seconds quicker than the 2019 911 Turbo Coupe and 911 Turbo Cabriolet, incidentally, which is a major leap forward on paper, at least (it’s more difficult to feel by the seat of the pants).

All of its performance gains can be attributed in part to new symmetrical VTG (variable turbine geometry) turbochargers that incorporate electrically controlled bypass valves, a reworked charge air cooling system, plus piezo fuel injectors. These improvements result in quicker throttle response, a freer rev range, stronger torque delivery, and improved performance all-round.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
The new 911 Turbo strikes a powerful pose.

The new 2021 911 Turbo sports the identical standard eight-speed dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission as the 911 Turbo S, by the way, while both models also include standard Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive. With the 911 Turbo, a car that can attain track speeds up to 320 km/h (198 mph), such control is needed.

What’s more, the new 2021 911 Turbo boasts the same buffed up exterior contours as the Turbo S, including 46 mm (1.8 in) of extra width than the Carrera between the front fenders and 20 mm (0.8 in) more between the fenders at back. This provides more room for bigger performance rubber measuring 10 mm (0.4 in) more front to rear.

Similarly, the front brake discs are 28 mm (1.1 in) wider than those on the previous 911 Turbo, while those opting for the upcoming 2021 Turbo can also purchase the same 10-piston caliper-infused ceramic brakes made optional with the new Turbo S. Additional extras include the aforementioned Sport Chrono Package, a Sport suspension upgrade, Porsche Active Suspension Management, and a rear-wheel steering system.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
The new 911 Turbo includes all of the interior updates as all new 911 models, plus more.

As you might have expected, Porsche has modified the new 911 Turbo’s cabin with all of the same updates as found in the regular Carrera models, plus some of the features found in the new Turbo S. Standard 14-way powered Sport seats will no doubt provide as much comfort as support, while a standard Bose audio system will keep those not solely enamoured with the sound of the powertrain entertained. Also available, a Lightweight package deletes the rear jump seats (that are only useful if you have small kids or grandkids), and exchanges the standard 14-way front Sport seats for a special set of lightweight performance buckets, while also removing some sound deadening material (that make the engine and exhaust sound better), resulting in 30 kg (66 lbs) of weight savings.

A 911 Turbo Sport package is also on the menu, including some SportDesign upgrades like black and carbon-fibre exterior trim plus clear tail lamps, while a unique sounding Sport exhaust system is also available. Additionally, the options list includes lane keep assist, dynamic cruise control, night vision assist, an overhead parking camera with a 360-degree bird’s-eye view, a Burmester audio system upgrade, etcetera.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo
Infotainment and other interior features have been dramatically improved in this latest generation 911.

The all-new 2021 Turbo Coupe is now available to order from your local Porsche retailer for $194,400, while the new 2021 Turbo Cabriolet is available from $209,000, plus fees and freight charges.

Before making that call, mind you, you should check out our 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page as there are factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent that you’ll want to get more info on. Also, take note of any rebates that only CarCostCanada members will find out about, while CarCostCanada members also have access to dealer invoice pricing that could save you even more. See how the CarCostCanada system works now, and remember to download our free CarCostCanada app onto your smartphone or tablet from the Google Android Store or Apple Store, so you can get access to all the most important car shopping info wherever you are.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate Road Test

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
For 2019, Hyundai changed the trim names for the Accent, this version now dubbed Ultimate for top-of-the-line.

If you look at the 20182020 Hyundai Accent, you’ll be hard pressed to see any changes at all. The fifth-generation entry-level subcompact model arrived in sedan and hatchback form during calendar year 2017, and since then only had its trim levels changed from L, LE, GL and GLS to Essential, Preferred and Ultimate for the 2019 model year, and lost its four-door body style for 2020 (in Canada, the U.S. kept the sedan and dropped the hatchback).

Actually, there’s a lot more to the 2020 Accent than meets the eye, particularly a redesigned engine and all-new optional continuously variable transmission (CVT) for those wanting an automatic, replacing the 2019’s conventional six-speed auto. Another change is the elimination of the six-speed manual gearbox from top-line Ultimate trim, this version of the car only available with the CVT for 2020.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
Hyundai gave the Accent some seriously sporty styling for an entry-level model.

By the way, Hyundai isn’t the only automaker to kill off its subcompact sedan in Canada. Toyota dropped its Mazda-built Yaris Sedan for the 2020 model year too, while Nissan said so long to its Versa Note and won’t be offering the redesigned Versa sedan (that’s available south of the border) in our jurisdiction. Ford also discontinued its Fiesta four- and five-door variants after the 2019 model year, while Chevy dropped its Sonic the year before that, all of which leaves Kia and its Rio as the only choice for sedan buyers in the subcompact class.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
LED headlights, chrome-trimmed fog lamps, and 17-inch alloy wheels are standard in Ultimate trim.

The 2020 Accent’s new 1.6-litre Smartstream engine replaces a very dependable four-cylinder of the same displacement, with the new one optimized for fuel economy over performance. The 2020 mill has actually lost 12 horsepower and 6 lb-ft of torque for a rating of 120 horsepower and 113 lb-ft compared to 132 horsepower and 119 lb-ft of torque in the 2019 car I last tested. In a car so small and light, this should make a significant difference, but it’s possible Hyundai has worked magic in the car’s manual and new CVT transmissions, so I’ll have to test the new one to know for sure.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The Accent Ultimate’s red-on-black interior really pulls eyeballs.

On the positive the new 2020 Accent is rated at 7.8 L/100km city, 6.1 highway and 7.0 combined with its standard six-speed manual, or 7.3, 6.0 and 6.7 respectively with the more efficient CVT. The outgoing 2019 Accent’s claimed rating of 8.2 L/100km in the city, 6.3 on the highway and 7.3 combined for both the manual and auto makes it easy to see Hyundai’s reason for change. In this class their choice of fuel economy over performance makes a lot of sense, being that most buyers are choosing Hyundai’s least expensive model in order to save money. After all, those who want a performance car can opt for the new Elantra N or one of the even sportier Veloster trims.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The nicely organized cockpit provides good comfort and great control.

Then again, the 2019 Accent 5-Door Ultimate I tested is really fun when powering away from stoplights, and it has no difficulty passing long semi-trailers on a two-lane highway. The six-speed manual is a joy to flick through its notchy double-H pattern, the clutch take-up is near effortless to engage and well sorted, making it as good for those wanting to learn how to drive manual as it is for seasoned pros, while the Ultimate model’s four-wheel disc brakes are strong (the two lesser trims get rear drums), and the 17-inch alloys make a difference when pushing it hard through tight corners. I’m not going to pretend this is some sort of hot hatch, but the Accent can hold its own through a set of fast-paced S-turns, while it’s very good on the open highway thanks to a fairly long wheelbase. I had no problem cruising in this car for the better part of a day, whether running errands around town or out on the freeway. After a weeklong test I found it comfortable and more than just capable, it was downright fun to drive.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The gauge cluster is simple yet effective.

I know it’s more popular to opt for crossover SUVs than regular cars these days, but those looking to save a couple thousand might want to fall in love with something like this low-slung hatchback instead of its more rugged looking alternative. Yes, Hyundai’s new Venue is tempting at just over $17k, but you can get into an Accent for under $15k and you’ll be getting a larger, more accommodating car with better performance or fuel economy (depending on the year).

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The two top trims include a 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen, while the Ultimate gets automatic climate control.

Put the two side-by-side and some will be forced to admit the sportier looking Accent has the edge on the Venue when it comes to styling too, but that will come down to personal taste, of course. The 2018 redesign did a lot to improve the Accent’s cool factor, thanks to big, bold grille and plenty of classy chrome elements to on this Ultimate model. The metal brightwork is most noticeable on the front fascia around the fog lights, also exclusive to this trim, while the side window mouldings and exterior door handles are chromed too. A set of LED headlights with LED signature accents also improve the look and functionality of this top-tier model, as does the set of LED turn signals infused into the side mirror caps, while its 17-inch multi-spoke alloys add class as well as some sporty character to the overall design.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The Accent’s large centre display features a big rearview camera with active guidelines.

As mentioned a moment ago, the 2020 Accent Essential can be had for a mere $14,949 (plus freight and fees), which a lot less expensive than last year’s base price of $17,349. As it was (and still is, being that 2019 models were available at the time of writing), the 2019 Accent came standard with a Comfort Package that’s now extra. The 2020 Essential with Comfort Package starts at $17,699, while the price for the Accent’s second-tier Preferred trim line has jumped up from $17,549 in 2019 to $17,899 in 2020, and the as-tested Ultimate has increased its entry price by $1,250, from $20,049 to $21,649, but remember that it now comes standard with the CVT. Willing to take a guess what the upgrade from six-speed manual to six-speed automatic is in a 2019 Accent? Yup, $1,250.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The Accent’s six-speed manual is a treat, but if you want it in top-line Ultimate trim you’d better opt for the more powerful 2019 model.

Important to note, Hyundai Canada is offering factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent on all 2019 Accent models, or up to $750 in additional incentives for 2020 Accents. To learn more, check out our 2020 Hyundai Accent Canada Prices and 2019 Hyundai Accent Canada Prices pages, where you can find out about available manufacturer rebates, manufacturer financing/leasing rates, and best of all, dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. We’ve even got a free CarCostCanada mobile app to make your shopping experience easier and less costly, so be sure to find out how our intelligent car shopping system can work for you when purchasing your next vehicle.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
Sporty looking front seats are impressive for the Accent’s entry-level class.

This is the largest Accent ever, by the way, which translates into a roomier, more accommodating car than most will expect in this class, particularly when it comes to interior width. The Accent’s seats provide a lot of adjustability, as long as you’re not hoping to adjust the driver’s lumbar support as there’s no way to do so, and while I would have like more pressure at my lower back, as well as deeper side bolsters, the Accent is a one-seat-fits-all compromise and therefore not capable of matching everyone’s body type perfectly. The rest of the seat’s adjustments were good, mind you, while the tilt and telescopic steering wheel’s reach was very good, enough so that my long-legged, short-torso body had no problem getting both comfortable and in control, which isn’t always the case in this class and some others.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
A powered moonroof comes standard in Ultimate trim.

The rear seating area is spacious and comfortable as well, although those that want a centre rear armrest will need to look elsewhere. The seatbacks fold 60/40, however, expanding the already sizeable cargo area when needing to haul longer items. When lowered, the seatbacks sit about four inches above the load floor, so it’s not flat, but I was glad Hyundai chose to maximize available space instead of making it all level. A small spare tire and some tools are stowed underneath, and a hard-shell cargo cover rests above, all expected in this class.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
Rear seat roominess is good for the subcompact segment.

Less normal in this entry-level segment is the Accent Ultimate’s impressive cabin decor, not to mention its bevy of features. Access by proximity keyless entry ahead of starting the engine via button was a nice touch, while the interior is further spiced up with a two-tone red and black colour scheme. Hyundai doesn’t finish any cabin surfaces with soft-touch plastics, but all armrests are padded leatherette, and sharp looking seats are plenty soft of course, these finished with red leatherette bolsters, red stitching and some cool hexagonal embroidery on their cloth seatbacks. The red theme continues over to the door panel inserts, more red thread on the leatherette shifter boot, plus more on the inside rim of the leather-wrapped steering wheel.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The Accent Hatchback’s dedicated cargo area is very generous.

The steering wheel is really nice, incidentally, while its spokes come filled with extremely high-quality switchgear, the toggles on the left adjusting the audio system and surrounding buttons for audio mode control, voice activation, and phone use, while the ones on the right are for scrolling through the monochromatic multi-information display and the Accent’s cruise control system.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
The rear seats fold in the usual 60/40 configuration.

The instruments in front of the driver are simple and straight-forward, with bright backlit dials on either side of the just-mentioned multi-information display. More impressive is the bright, colourful and well-endowed 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen on the centre stack, which includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, Bluetooth audio and phone streaming, regular audio functions, the latter including satellite radio, a large backup camera with moving guidelines, and more.

A single-zone automatic climate control system can be adjusted just below, which includes large dials for easy use while wearing winter gloves, while under that is a row of buttons for the three-way heatable front seats and even one for the heated steering wheel rim. Where the centre stack meets the lower console is a big tray for holding your smartphone, plus USB-A and auxiliary connections.

2019 Hyundai Accent 5-Door Ultimate
Say goodbye to the 2019 Accent’s more powerful engine, and hello to the 2020’s model’s more efficient replacement.

The top-line Accent Ultimate also includes a powered moonroof and forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, by the way, while equipment pulled up from lesser trims include the tilt-and-telescopic steering column (the base model only gets a tilting wheel), cruise control, front seat heaters and the larger 7.0-inch centre touchscreen (instead of the 5.0-inch one on the base model) mentioned already, as well as automatic on/off headlights, six-speaker audio (an improvement over four speakers found in the base model), keyless access, and a USB-A charging port in the rear seating area from Preferred trim; the automatic transmission and Bluetooth noted before, plus power-adjustable and heatable side mirrors, air conditioning and powered windows from the Essential Comfort package; and finally variable intermittent front windshield wipers, a manually adjustable six-way driver’s seat, a manually adjustable four-way front passenger’s seat, and power door locks from the base Essential model.

There’s a lot to like about today’s Accent, especially when factoring in value. Add in a five-year, 100,000 km comprehensive warranty and it all starts making sense. If you’re not wholly sold on a new subcompact SUV like Hyundai’s Venue or Kona, I recommend you take a closer look at the Accent, and when you do, don’t forget to choose a 2019 model for performance or 2020 to save more on fuel.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo editing: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

Hot new 911 Targa 4 and 4S ready to order

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4
The new “entry-level” 2021 Targa 4 is one gorgeous new addition to the 911 family.

The all-new 911 (992) Coupe and Cabriolet have been with us for much of the year now, with various trims including the Carrera, Carrera S, Carrera 4, Carrera 4S and Turbo S trickling out of Porsche’s Baden-Württemberg, Stuttgart assembly plant since inception, and now that the redesigned Targa is here the 911 family is complete.

OK, GTS models have yet to arrive, but at least all 911 body styles are accounted for, until the automaker makes a Speedster variant that is. The Targa first arrived at the 1965 Frankfurt Motor Show before showing up in production trim for the 1967 model year, this first convertible 911 designed with a roll hoop behind driver and passenger to meet expected U.S. safety regulations that never materialized.

Along with the stainless steel covered roll bar, the first Targa featured a removable rear window made from plastic, this replaced with fixed rear glass window the following year, while the Targa’s roof design has been modified dramatically over the years. While the roll hoop sometimes came in black instead of silver, the first model had a removable roof panel ahead of the 1996–1998 993 model that came out with a power-sliding glass roof that automatically stowed below the rear window. The update, which carried over to the 2006–2012 997, completely overhauled the Targa’s look with sweptback C pillars and sharply angled rear quarter windows.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4
The side profile the new 992-type Targa looks very similar to the outgoing 991.

The 2016–2019 991.2 Targa said goodbye to the big powered sunroof and hello to a power-retractable hardtop-style roof mechanism that hoisted the entire rear deck lid ahead of storing the roof panel underneath. This new roof design allowed Porsche to return to the original silver roll hoop styling too, and thankfully this more technical approach continues forward into the new 2021 911 Targa. While the roof mechanism is a highly sophisticated bit of kit, it only takes 19 seconds to lower or raise, so therefore it can easily be done while waiting at a stoplight.

Everything under the new Targa’s beltline is mostly the latest 992-generation Carrera Coupe/Convertible design, which means that the new hood and lower front fascia eliminate the outgoing 911’s body-colour ovoid shapes and add straighter, more horizontal lines, highlighted by a big, black rectangular front vent that first catches the eye. This gives the new model a wider, more aggressive stance, whereas the sharply angled hood features classic tapered creases at each side of its indented centre, much like the original 911’s hood, but without the vented end. Porsche’s ovoid multi-element four-point LED headlight clusters are almost identical to the outgoing car, which will a positive to anyone still fearing the days of the much-lambasted 996.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4
With the new Targa’s arrival, all three 911 body types are accounted for.

The three vertical indentations on the new Targa’s B pillars, and the classic scripted “targa” nameplate and silver colour treatment, help 991 and 992 model profiles initially look the same. Inspecting the new car’s design more closely, however, in fact reveals front and rear fascias wrapping farther around the side bodywork, plus fractionally more upright headlights, tail lamps that extend forward much like the rear bumper vents, reworked front side marker lights, new flat-bezeled wheel cutouts, an updated set of mirror housings, special flush-mounted exterior door handles that extend outward when touched (replacing the outgoing model’s more traditionally rounded door pulls), and a smoother rear deck lid, all resulting a fresh new take on the classic 911 Targa’s design.

Those tail lamps come into clearer view when seen from behind, with the new model expanding on the outgoing 991’s slim, dagger-like LED-enhanced lenses and even narrower body-wide light strip by reach farther outward to each side, plus grafting on some 718-like 3D-like graphics at the centre lighting position, these sitting over seemingly open vent slats underneath, while carving out even an more linear design for the outer taillights.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The Targa’s interior is identical to the new Carrera’s cabin.

Just like the new Carrera, the updated Targa’s diffuser-enhanced lower rear bumper is larger, blacker, and beefier looking than previously, while it also feeds the engine’s exhaust pipes from within instead of forcing them to exit below. Additionally, hidden under the new 911’s flowing rear deck lid and just over the aforementioned light strip, which sits below a row of gloss-black engine vent strakes, is a wider and larger active spoiler boasting multiple positions depending on variable levels of rear downforce.

The new 911 Targa’s bumpers aside, all body panels are now formed out of lightweight aluminum, whereas the front fenders and underlying body structure were lightened substantially, the latter more than halving its steel content from 63 to 30 percent. The 70 percent left over is now wholly constructed from aluminum, all of which helps to improve structural rigidity, handling, and fuel-efficiency.

New standard Targa 4 wheels measure 19 inches up front and 20 inches at the rear, with the former shod in 235/40 ZR-rated performance rubber and the latter wearing a wider set of 295/35 ZRs, whereas the Targa 4S gets a staggered set of 20- and 21-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 245/35 ZR and 305/30 ZR tires respectively.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The Targa 4S boasts considerably more power and the option of a 7-speed manual gearbox.

As with the new Carreras and Turbos that arrived before, the latest Targa comes with an interior that was inspired by 911 models from the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and even the 1990s, especially regarding the wide, horizontal dash layout to the right of the traditional arcing instrument hood. The former even incorporates a narrow shelf that mimics the lower edge of the original model’s dashboard, but that’s about it when it comes to mirroring Porsche’s past 911 cabins.

The new Targa’s electronic interfaces immediately set it apart as a state-of-the-art machine, its instrument cluster mostly digital other than housing an analogue tachometer at centre. With the ignition on the new 911 Targa follows Porsche tradition thanks to a five-dial layout, although the left TFT/LCD display incorporates a conventional-style speedometer in default mode, or alternatively the car’s new advanced driver assistance systems that include adaptive cruise control, blind spot warning, lane keeping assist, etcetera, whereas the right-side screen features a multi-information display with route guidance, audio, trip, cruise control info and more.

The just-noted horizontal dash design incorporates a big 10.9-inch high-definition Porsche Communication Management (PCM) infotainment touchscreen, which is 3.9 inch larger than the previously car’s centre display. It boasts much greater depth of colour too, plus new graphics, better performance, and additional features from fewer analogue switches.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
Is the Targa for you? The classic silver roll hoop certainly adds its own element of style.

As with the previous 911 Targa, the new 2021 version will initially ship in 4 and 4S trims, while a Targa 4 GTS will arrive later. The base Targa 4 includes Porsche’s 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine that’s good for 379 horsepower and 332 lb-ft of torque. It comes mated to a standard eight-speed PDK automated transmission with steering wheel paddles (the new autobox gets one more forward gear compared to the outgoing Targa’s seven-speed PDK), which results in a scant 4.4-second sprint from zero to 100 km/h in base trim or 4.2 seconds from standstill to 100 km/h with its Sport Chrono Package upgrade.

Porsche makes a seven-speed manual transmission available when opting for the Sport Chrono Package in the new 911 Targa 4S, which when combined with this model’s more potent 443 horsepower 3.0-litre six putting out 390 lb-ft of torque only matches the less powerful Targa 4’s 4.4-second sprint to 100 km/h, this because of the base Targa’s more efficient standard PDK gearbox. This said, when the more formidable engine is synched up to the dual-clutch automated PDK it can manage a much more entertaining 3.8-second zero to 100 km/h sprint in its base trim or 3.6 seconds to the same mark with the Sport Chrono Package.

As with the new all-wheel drive Carrera 4 and 4S that launched earlier, both Targa 4 and 4S models use a unique water-cooled front differential that features reinforced clutches to increase load capacities and overall durability. When combined with standard Porsche Traction Management (PTM), the new front axle drive system improves the two Targa models’ traction in slippery situations, while also enhancing performance in dry conditions.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The partially open-top Targa is just as quick as the various Carrera models.

What’s more, all 2021 911 Targa owners will benefit from Porsche’s new standard Wet mode that gets added to the revised steering wheel-mounted drive mode selector. The new technology automatically maintains better control over wet or snow-covered road surfaces when engaged.

Each new 911 also receives standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection, plus a standard high-definition backup camera and rear parking sonar improve safety further.

Also standard, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) features electronically variable dampers with both Normal and Sport settings, while Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus), standard with the Targa 4S, is optional with the base Targa 4, and includes an electronic rear differential lock with fully variable torque distribution.

Of note, the base Targa 4’s standard brake rotors are 330 millimetres in diameter both front and rear, while featuring black-painted monobloc fixed calipers with four pistons at the front. The Targa 4S, on the other hand, gets a set of 350-mm calipers bright red painted exteriors that feature six pistons up front. The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system is also available, as are staggered front/rear 20/21-inch alloy rims.

2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
We’d sure love one of these parked outside our office.

The new 2021 Porsche Targa 4 is available from $136,000 (plus freight and fees), whereas the 2021 Targa 4 S starts at $154,100. To find out more about all the 2020 Carreras and 2021 Turbo models, see our 2020 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page and 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page (the 911 Targa and 2021 Carrera models will be added when Canadian-spec info is available). Here you can configure each model and trim plus add available options, research valuable rebate info, find out about manufacturer financing and leasing rates (which currently can be had from zero percent), and also access dealer invoice pricing that could easily save you thousands.

Also, be sure to browse through our complete photo gallery above, while the following four videos (Dreamcatcher is filmed in Vancouver) show the power-operated roof in its fully automated glory:

 

The new Porsche 911 Targa (1:07):

 

 

The new Porsche 911 Targa – Dreamcatcher (1:21):

 

 

Virtual world premiere: The new Porsche 911 Targa (3:53):

 

 

The 911 Targa – the timeline of a Porsche legend (2:15):

 

CarCostCanada

2019 Nissan Versa Note Road Test

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The 2019 Versa Note might now be discontinued, but it’s still a good little economy car worth your attention.

Does the idea of purchasing an inexpensive, economical yet very comfortable, roomy and practical hatchback at zero-percent financing sound like a good idea right now? If so, I recommend taking a closer look at the new 2019 Versa Note.

Of course, a 2019 model is hardly “new” this far into 2020, but it nevertheless is a new car that’s never been licensed and therefore qualifies for new car financing and leasing rates, plus it comes with a full warranty.

As it is there are too many Versa Notes still available on Nissan Canada’s dealer lots, so the automaker has created an incentive program to sell them off as quickly as possible. This benefits you of course, so it might be a really good idea to find out if this little car suits your wants and needs, because the price is right.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa Note’s tall roofline and long wheelbase provide a lot of interior room.

The Versa Note was discontinued last year, but cancelling a car doesn’t mean it’s not worth buying. In actual fact, Nissan’s second-smallest model is an excellent city car that’s also better than most on the highway, plus it offers more passenger and cargo room than the majority of its subcompact rivals. It just happens to be past its stale date, having already been replaced by two trendier subcompact crossover sport utilities dubbed Kicks and Qashqai.

Those wanting Nissan’s latest styling will be happy to find out the Versa Note received an update for its 2017 model year, incorporating most of the brand’s latest frontal styling cues for much more attractive styling than the previous incarnation. The Note doesn’t include a floating roof design, like the Leaf EV and most other new Nissan models, while its taillights are also unique to the model, but its hind end is nevertheless attractive and overall shape easy on the eyes.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa Note SV comes with these attractive 15-inch alloy wheels.

At least as important, the Versa Note provides a taller driver and passengers a lot of headroom due to its overall height, making the car feel more like a small SUV than a subcompact city car. The seats are particularly comfortable as well, due to memory foam that truly cushions and supports one’s backside, plus the upholstery in my top-line SV model was very good looking, with an attractive blue fleck pattern on black fabric. The driver’s seat even includes a comfortable minivan-style fold-down armrest on its right side.

Additional niceties include a leather-clad steering wheel rim, stylish satin-silver spokes, and a tilt steering column. Nissan adorns each dash vent with the same silver surface treatment, not to mention both edges of the centre stack and the entire shift lever surround panel.

Also impressive, my tester’s upgraded instrument cluster features backlit dials and really attractive digital displays. It’s so stylish that it makes the centre touchscreen seem dowdy by comparison. Truth be told, the main infotainment display is graphically challenged, particularly when put beside some of Nissan’s more recently improved models, but it more than does the job and is user-friendly enough, while at 7.0 inches it’s reasonably bit for this class, which provides good rear visibility through the reverse camera.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Note is a comfortable well designed car that’s perfect for those not needing all the latest technologies.

While there isn’t much to criticize the Versa Note about, no telescoping steering means it might not fit your body ideally. I have longer legs than torso and therefore had to crank the seatback farther forward than I normally would so as not crowd my legs and feet around the pedals, which worked but would’ve caused me to think twice about purchasing one.

On a much better note, those in back will find a lot more legroom than most subcompact contemporaries (the Versa Note is actually classified as a mid-size model), this thanks to a very long wheelbase, which makes the Versa Note perfect for taller than average folks. Rear passengers will find a comfortable folding armrest in the centre position, with the usual twin cupholders integrated within, another duo of cupholders can be found on the backside of the front console. Lastly, a magazine pouch is included on the backside of the front passenger’s seat.

The Note is also great for hauling loads of gear. It gets the usual 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks, but its innovative Divide-N-Hide adjustable cargo floor doesn’t follow the subcompact herd. It can be moved up or down as required, meaning you can stow taller items in the latter position or otherwise awkward cargo on a flat load floor when slotted into the former. You can fit up to 532 litres (18.8 cubic feet) behind the rear seats, incidentally, or 1,084 litres (38.3 cu ft) of what-have-you by lowering both rear seatbacks. That’s very good, by the way.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The SV gets an upgraded gauge cluster that’s really attractive.

For its price range the spacious Versa Note gets its fair share of equipment, but like all new cars this depends on which trim is chosen. Of note, the sportiest SR mode was discontinued for 2019 and the more luxurious SL was dropped for 2018, but Nissan brought in a $700 SV Special Edition package for this final year, which includes a set of fog lights, a rear rooftop spoiler, and Special Edition badges on the outside, plus proximity keyless entry for access to the cabin along with pushbutton start/stop to get things going once strapped inside, while other goodies include an enhanced NissanConnect infotainment system featuring Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, plus satellite radio.

A quick look at my test model’s photos will show no fog lights or rear spoiler, so I won’t be directly reporting on the 2019 SV Special Edition, but its 15-inch alloys make it clear that this isn’t a base model either (the entry-level Note S gets 15-inch steel wheels with covers). The regular SV starts at $18,398 and includes the aforementioned gauge cluster upgrade as well as the leather-clad steering wheel also noted before, along with powered door locks with remote access, power windows, a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT), cruise control, a six-way manual driver’s seat (featuring height adjustment), heated front seats, a cargo cover, plus more.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
Nissan includes a large 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen as standard equipment, but even when upgraded in SV trim its graphics look a bit dated.

Base S trim, which starts at $14,698 plus freight and fees, is the only 2019 Versa Note trim that can be had with a five-speed manual gearbox (you could get a manual with the SV for the 2018 model year), but base buyers should know the CVT can be added for a mere $1,300 extra. Transmission aside, base S trim also gets a set of powered and heated exterior mirrors, a four-way manual driver’s seat, air conditioning, a less comprehensively equipped 7.0-inch infotainment system, Bluetooth hands-free with streaming audio, phone and audio switchgear on the steering wheel, a hands-free text message assistant, Siri Eyes Free, auxiliary and USB ports, four-speaker audio, etcetera.

All the usual active and passive safety gear is included as well, of course, but those wanting the newest advanced driver assistance systems like collision warning with automatic emergency braking, blindspot monitoring with lane departure warning, or active cruise control with Nissan’s semi-autonomous ProPILOT assist self-driving tech had better choose one of the automaker’s more recently introduced subcompact crossovers.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa Note’s front seats are extremely comfortable, although not all body types will fit ideally due to no telescopic steering.

Let’s be nice and call the Versa Note traditional instead of antiquated, because at the end of the day it goes about its business very well and therefore delivers what many consumers require from a daily commuter. While hardly as technologically advanced or trendy in design, the Note nevertheless provides comfortable seating and a very good ride for its entry-level price range, plus decent get-up-and-go when pushing off from standstill or while passing, plus its CVT is ultra smooth.

The Versa Note uses the same 1.6-litre four-cylinder as the smaller Micra, making an identical 109 horsepower and 107 lb-ft of torque. That means the bigger, heftier model doesn’t feel quite as quick off the line. The Note’s purpose is more about fuel economy anyway, and with that in mind it manages a claimed five-cycle rating of 8.6 L/100km city, 6.6 highway and 7.7 combined with its manual, or 7.6 city, 6.2 highway and 7.0 combined with the CVT. That doesn’t seem all that great until comparing it to the Micra that has the same 1,092-kilogram curb weight when fully loaded as the Note’s base trim (the Note SV as-tested hits the scales at 1,124 kg), but still only can manage 7.9 L/100km combined with its manual and 8.0 combined with its four-speed auto. I think the similarly roomy Honda Fit is a better comparison, the innovative subcompact capable of 7.0 L/100km combined with its six-speed manual or just 6.5 with its most economical CVT.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The rear seating area is very spacious with excellent headroom and legroom.

As for handling, the Micra has the Versa Note beat any day of the week. In fact, Nissan Canada uses the Micra in a spec racing series, something that would be laughable in the more comfort-oriented Note. The larger hatchback is particularly tall as noted, so therefore its high centre of gravity works counter to performance when attempting to take corners quickly, but then again if you don’t mind a bit of body roll it manages just fine. Better yet is the Versa’s roomy comfort, whether tooling through town or hustling down a four-lane freeway where it’s long wheelbase aids high-speed stability, it’s a good choice.

If you think this little Nissan might suit your lifestyle and budget and therefore would like to take advantage of the zero-percent financing mentioned before, I’d recommend checking out our 2019 Nissan Versa Note Canada Prices page where you can browse through all trims and packages in detail, plus quickly scan colour choices within each trim, while also searching for the latest manufacturer rebates that could save you even more.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa Note is big on cargo room and load versatility.

Better yet, a CarCostCanada membership provides access to dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when making a purchase. Everything just mentioned can be accessed at the CarCostCanada website or via a new downloadable CarCostCanada app, so make sure to check your phone’s app store. This said, ahead of calling your local Nissan retailer to purchase a new Versa Note, or connecting with them online (and it’s a good idea to deal with them remotely right now), be sure to do your homework here at CarCostCanada so you can claim the best possible deal.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay

CarCostCanada

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT FWD and AWD Road Test

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
The Mazda3 Sport looks fabulous in GT trim, this one featuring a 6-speed manual and FWD.

Mazda redesigned its compact 3 for the 2019 model year, and of course I spent a week with one, causing me to declare it as the best car in its compact segment by a long shot. Since then the completely redesigned 2020 Toyota Corolla came on the scene, and while the Mazda3 might still outmuscle the Corolla into the top spot as far as I’m concerned, it’s no longer so far ahead.

As it is, the car I like most and the model, or models the majority of consumers choose to purchase don’t always agree. The current compact sales leader is Honda’s Civic, an excellent car that deserves its success. This said the Civic not only outpaces everything else in the compact segment by a wide margin, but as a matter of fact is also the top-selling car in Canada. Still, it lost 12.8 percent year-over-year in 2019, one of its worst showings in a long time, yet it nevertheless managed to exceed 60,000 units for a total of 60,139. The Corolla came in second after a 2.5-percent YoY downturn that ended with 47,596 units sold, whereas the Hyundai Elantra came in third after dropping 5.5 percent that resulted in 39,463 sales. Where does the Mazda3 fit in? It managed fourth after a shocking 20.4-percent plunge to 21,276 deliveries.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
The new Mazda3 Sport is one of the most attractive cars in its class, this one boasting GT trim and new AWD.

The list of competitors in this class is long and varied, with most backpedalling throughout the previous year, including VW’s Golf that came close to ousting the Mazda3 from fourth place with 19,668 sales after an 8.4-percent downturn, although to be fair to Volkswagen I should probably be pulling its 17,260 Jetta deliveries into the equation after that model’s 14.1 percent growth, resulting in 36,928 compact peoples’ cars (or, in fact, fourth place), while the Kia Forte also grew by 8.0 percent for a reasonably strong 15,549 units. I won’t itemize out the category’s sub-10,000 unit challengers, but will say that some, including Chevy’s Cruze and Ford’s Focus, have now been discontinued.

As for why I’m reviewing a 2019 model so far into this 2020 calendar year? Last year’s supply is still plentiful throughout the country in most trims. I can’t say exactly why this is so, but it’s highly likely that Mazda Canada didn’t fully plan for last year’s slowdown in take-rate. Either way you now have the opportunity of some savings when purchasing a 2019, this being a worthwhile endeavour being that the new 2020 model hasn’t changed much at all, whether we’re talking about the base four-door sedan or sportier hatchback model. As you can clearly see I’m now writing about the five-door Sport in this review, but take note I’ll cover the four-door sedan soon. I’ve tested two top-tier GT trims in both front- and all-wheel drive (FWD and AWD) for this review, so I’ll make sure to go over most important issues, particularly my driving experience with Mazda’s i-Activ AWD system in this low-slung sporty car.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
The new 3 has clean, minimalist lines that should appeal to most compact car shoppers.

With respect to any 2019 Mazda3 Sport discounts, our 2019 Mazda Mazda3 Sport Canada Prices page shows up to $1,000 in additional incentives in comparison to $750 if opting for the newer model shown on our 2020 Mazda Mazda3 Sport Canada Prices page. There isn’t much difference from year to year, but you’ll likely be able to negotiate a bigger discount if you have maximum information, so therefore keep in mind that a CarCostCanada membership provides dealer invoice pricing that gives you the edge when haggling with your local retailer. Of course, this knowledge could leave thousands in your wallet whether trading up or just trying to get a simple deal, plus CarCostCanada also gives access to the latest manufacturer rebates and more. Be sure to check it out before visiting your local dealer.

Before heading to your dealer it’s also good to know that five-door Sport trims are the same mechanically to the four-door Mazda3 sedan, which means that both 2.0-litre and 2.5-litre SkyActiv four-cylinder engines are available. The base mill makes 155 horsepower and 150 lb-ft of torque, whereas the larger displacement engine is good for 186 horsepower and an identical 186 lb-ft of torque, while a six-speed manual is standard across the entire line, even top-tier GT trim, and a six-speed automatic is optional. The manual offers a fairly sporty short throw and easy, evenly weighted clutch take-up, whereas the auto provides manual shifting capability plus a set of steering wheel-mounted paddles when upgrading to GT trim. Both gearboxes come standard with a drive mode selector that includes a particularly responsive Sport setting, while the new i-Activ AWD system can only be had with the automatic transmission.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
LED headlights are standard across the line, and 18-inch alloys are standard with GT trim.

The Mazda3 Sport GT comes standard with proximity-sensing keyless entry for 2020, which was part of the optional Premium package that my 2019 tester included. The upgrade adds a nicer looking frameless centre mirror for 2020 too, plus satin chrome interior trim, but then again the 2019 version shown in the gallery was hardly short of nicely finished metals.

Model year 2019 Mazda3 Sport trims include the GX ($21,300), the mid-range GS ($24,000) and the top-tier GT ($25,900). The base 2.0-litre engine is only in the GX model, whereas the 2.5-litre mill is exclusive to both GS and GT trim lines. The automatic gearbox adds $1,300 across the line, while i-Activ AWD increases each automatic-equipped trims’ bottom line by $1,700.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
LED taillights are standard with every 2019 or 2020 Mazda3.

Both engines include direct injection, 16 valves and dual-overhead cams, plus various SkyActiv features that minimize fuel usage, the bigger 2.5-litre motor featuring segment-exclusive cylinder-deactivation. Both engines utilize less expensive regular unleaded gasoline too, the 2.0-litre achieving a claimed Transport Canada five-cycle rating of 8.7 L/100km in the city, 6.6 on the highway and 7.8 combined when mated to the base manual gearbox, or 8.6 in the city, 6.7 on the highway and 7.7 combined when conjoined to the auto. The 2.5-litre, on the other hand, is said to be capable of 9.2 L/100km city, 6.6 highway and 8.1 combined with its manual transmission, 9.0, 6.8 and 8.0 respectively with the autobox, or 9.8, 7.4 and 8.7 with AWD.

The top-line engine doesn’t use much more fuel when considering its power advantage. Of course, the minor difference in fuel economy would widen if one were to drive the quicker car more aggressively, which is tempting, but I only pushed my two weeklong test cars for short durations, and merely to test what they could do. I was grateful the red FWD car with the black cabin was fitted with the standard six-speed manual gearbox, and the grey AWD model with the red interior was upgraded to the six-speed automatic with paddles, thus providing very different driving experiences.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
This Mazda3 Sport GT AWD came with a gorgeous red and black interior.

Before I get into that, the Mazda3 GT offers a superb driving position, which isn’t always true in this economically targeted compact class. The GT Premium’s 10-way powered driver’s seat, which includes powered lumbar support and is also part of the GS trims’ feature set when upgraded to its Luxury package, is wonderfully comfortable with good lateral support and excellent lower back support. Even better, the car’s tilt and telescoping steering column offers very long reach, which is important as I have a longer set of legs than torso. I was therefore able to pull the Mazda3 Sport’s steering wheel further rearward than I needed, allowing for an ideal driver’s position that maximized comfort and control.

There’s plenty of space and comfortable seating in back as well, with good headroom that measured approximately three and a half inches over my crown, plus I had about four inches in front of my knees, more than enough space for my feet below the driver’s seat when it was set up for my five-foot-eight body. Also, there were four inches from my outer hip and shoulder to the rear door panel, which was ample, and speaking of breadth I imagine there’d be more than enough space to seat three regular-sized adults on the rear bench, although I’d rather not have anyone bigger than a small child in between rear passengers.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
The GT’s Premium package adds some very upscale features, like these drilled aluminum speaker grates that come with the Bose audio system.

Mazda provides a wide folding armrest with two integrated cupholders in the middle, but the 3 Sport doesn’t get a lot of fancy features in back, like overhead reading lamps, air vents, heatable outboard seats, and USB charge points (or for that matter any other kind of device charger).

I found the dedicated cargo area large enough for my requirements, plus it was carpeted up the sidewalls and on the backsides of each 60/40 split folding seat. Unfortunately Mazda doesn’t include any type of pass-through down the middle, which is the same for most rivals, but the hard-shell carpeted cargo cover feels like a premium bit of kit and was easily removable, although take note that it must either be reversed and placed on the cargo floor to be stowed away, or slotted behind the front seats. Altogether, the 3 Sport allows for 569 litres behind those rear seats, or 1,334 litres when they’re laid flat, which is pretty good for this class.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
It’s hard to go wrong with a classic black interior, especially one as well designed and fully featured as the Mazda3.

The Mazda3 impresses even more when it comes to interior quality and refinement. Its styling is more minimalist than opulent, but this said few volume-branded compacts come anywhere as close to providing such a premium-level car. For instance, its entire dash top and each door upper gets covered in a higher grade of padded composite material than the class average, while the instrument panel facing and door inserts are treated to an even more luxurious faux leather with stitching. One of my testers’ cabins was even partially dyed in a gorgeous dark red, really setting it apart from more mainstream alternatives.

I’ve been fond of the latest Mazda3 since first testing it in the previously noted sedan body style, particularly the horizontal dash design theme that’s visually strengthened by a bright metal strip of trim spanning the entire instrument panel from door to door. It cuts right through the dual-zone automatic climate control interface, and provides a clean and tidy lower framing of the vents both left and right. This top-line model adds more brushed metal, including beautifully drilled aluminum speaker grilles plus plenty of satin-aluminized trim elsewhere. Mazda continues its near-premium look and feel by wrapping the front door uppers in the same high-quality cloth as the roofliner.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
Two analogue gauges are surrounded by a 7.0-inch digital display at centre.

Visually encircled by an attractive leather-wrapped sport steering wheel, its rim held in place by stylish thin spokes adorned with premium-quality metal and composite switchgear, the 3’s gauge cluster is a mix of analogue dials to the outside and pure digital functionality within, organized into Mazda’s classic three-gauge design. The speedometer sides in the middle, and thus is part of the 7.0-inch display that also includes a variety of other functions. It’s not as comprehensively featured as some others, but all the important functions are included.

The 8.8-inch main display is sits upright like a wide, narrow tablet, yet due to its low profile the screen is smaller than average. Some will like it and some won’t, particularly when backing up, as the rearview camera needed extra attention. The camera is clear with good resolution, while its dynamic guidelines are a helpful aid, but I’m used to larger displays.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
The infotainment system is good, but the display is not the largest in the industry.

All other infotainment features work well, with Mazda providing a minimalist’s dream interface that’s merely white writing on a black background for most interface panels, except navigation mapping, of course, which is as bright and colourful as most automakers in this class, as was for the satellite radio display that provided cool station graphics. Unfortunately there’s no touchscreen for tapping, swiping and pinching features, the system only controlled by a rotating dial and surrounding buttons on the lower console, which while giving the 3 a more premium look and feel than most rivals, isn’t always as easy to use. I was able to do most things easily enough, however, such as pairing my smartphone via Android Auto (Apple CarPlay is standard as well).

Being that so many 2019 Mazda3 trims are still available, I’ll give you a full rundown of the aforementioned upgrade packages, with the GS trim’s Luxury package adding the 10-way powered driver’s seat with memory noted before, as well as leatherette upholstery, an auto-dimming centre mirror, and a power glass sunroof with a manual-sliding sunshade. Incidentally, GT trim comes standard with the auto-dimming rearview mirror and moonroof and offers an optional Premium package that swaps out the faux leather upholstery for the real deal and also adds the power/memory driver’s seat, plus it links the exterior mirrors to the memory seat while adding auto-dimming to the driver’s side.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
All trims offer manual or automatic transmissions.

Additionally, the GT Premium package adds 18-inch alloys in a black metallic finish, a windshield wiper de-icer, proximity keyless access, a windshield-projected colour Active Driving Display (ADD) (or in other words a head-up display/HUD), rear parking sonar, a HomeLink garage door opener, satellite radio (with a three-month trial subscription), SiriusXM Traffic Plus and Travel Link services (with a five-year trial subscription), the previously noted navigation system, and Traffic Sign Recognition (TSR), a host of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) including Smart Brake Support Rear (SBS-R) that automatically stops the car if it detects something in the way (like a curb, wall or lighting standard), and Smart Brake Support Rear Crossing (SBS-RC) that does the same albeit after detecting a car or (hopefully) a pedestrian, these last two features complementing the Smart Brake Support (SBS) and Smart City Brake Support (SCBS) automatic emergency braking from the GS, plus that mid-range model’s Distance Recognition Support System (DRSS), Forward Obstruction Warning (FOW), forward-sensing Pedestrian Detection, Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS), Lane-keep Assist System (LAS), Driver Attention Alert (DAA), High Beam Control System (HBC), and last but hardly least, Radar Cruise Control with Stop & Go. Incidentally, the base GX model features standard Advanced Blind Spot Monitoring (ABSM) with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), which means those inside a Mazda3 GT with its Premium package are well protected against any possible accident.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
How do you like his deep red upholstery? Thumbs up or down?

Now that we’re talking features, the base GX includes standard LED headlights, LED tail lamps, front and rear LED interior lighting, pushbutton start/stop, an electromechanical parking brake, three-way heated front seats, Bluetooth phone/audio connectivity, SMS text message reading/responding capability, plus more, while I also appreciated the sunglasses holder in the overhead console that’s standard with the GS, which protects lenses well thanks to a soft felt lining, not to mention the GS model’s auto on/off headlamps (the GX only shuts them off automatically), rain-sensing wipers, heatable side mirrors, dual-zone auto HVAC, and heated leather-clad steering wheel rim.

As for the GT, its standard Adaptive (cornering) Front-lighting System (AFS) with automatic levelling and signature highlights front and back make night vision very clear, while its 12-speaker Bose audio system delivered good audio quality, and the 18-inch rims on 215/45 all-season tires would have without doubt been better through the corners compared to the GX and GS models’ 205/60R16 all-season rubber on 16-inch alloys.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
The rear seating area is spacious and comfortable.

Sportiest GT trim makes do with a slightly firmer ride than the lower trims, but it was never harsh. Better yet is its impressive road-holding skill, the 3 GT always providing stable, controlled cornering and strong, linear braking even though it only uses a simple front strut, rear torsion beam suspension configuration. Take note the 2020 Corolla and Civic mentioned earlier come with fully independent suspension designs.

As you might imagine, the 2.5-litre four-cylinder has a lot more fire in the belly than the 2.0-litre mill, while its Sport mode made a big difference off the line and during passing procedures. The automatic transmission’s manual mode only needs you to pull the shift lever to engage, while the aforementioned steering wheel shift paddles work best when choosing manual mode, but don’t need it in order to change gears. This said the DIY manual shifts so well you may want to pocket the $1,300 needed for the automatic and shift on your own.

2019 Mazda3 Sport GT
Cargo space is more than adequate for the compact class.

Thanks to the grippy new optional AWD system, takeoff is immediate with no noticeable front wheel spin, which of course isn’t the case with the FWD car, especially in inclement weather. It also felt easier to control through curves at high speeds in both wet and dry weather, but I must admit that my manual-equipped FWD tester had its own level of control that simply couldn’t be matched with an automatic when pushed hard. As much as I liked the manual, I’d probably choose AWD so I wouldn’t be forced to put on chains when heading up the ski hill or while traveling through the mountains during winter.

Everything said, the Mazda3 is a great choice for those who love to drive, plus it’s as well made as many premium-branded compact models, generously outfitted with popular features, a strong enough seller so that its resale value stays high, impressively dependable, and impressively safe as per the IIHS that honoured the U.S. version with a Top Safety Pick award for 2019. That it’s also one of the better looking cars in the compact class is just a bonus, although one that continues to deliver on that near-premium promise Mazda has been providing to mainstream consumers in recent years.

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

CarCostCanada

Porsche unveils most potent, quickest 911 Turbo S ever

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo S
The new 911 Turbo S looks even more muscular than the outgoing model, and backs that muscle up with 61 more hp and 37 more lb-ft of torque.

Despite the Geneva Motor Show getting cancelled due to the outbreak of COVID-19, automakers are making their major reveals online, so therefore Porsche has anted up with the most exciting variation on entirely new 992 theme yet.

The new 911 Turbo S was just introduced via the internet with a surprising 61-horsepower increase over its much-revered 580-hp predecessor, which means that it now produces a shocking 641-horsepower from an identically sized 3.8-litre six-cylinder enhanced by two VTG (variable turbine geometry) turbos. The horizontally opposed engine also develops another 37 lb-ft of torque for a grand total of 590, so be happy that it comes standard with Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive, which incidentally has the ability to transfer up to 369 pound-feet of twist to the front wheels when necessary.

The Turbo S’ 3.8-litre turbocharged six-cylinder mill, which is based on the latest 911 Carrera engine, has been totally redesigned. The update includes a new charge air-cooling system as well as new, bigger VTG turbochargers laid out in a symmetrical design that features electrically adjustable waste-gate flaps, while piezo injectors significantly improve “responsiveness, power, torque, emissions, and revving ability,” said Porsche in a press release.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo S
The 911 Turbo S Cabriolet is only slightly slower to 100km/h than the Coupe, yet matches the mighty GT2 RS.

An upgraded “Turbo-specific” eight-speed dual-clutch PDK automated transmission comes standard, which allows for a blisteringly fast sprint from zero to 100 km/h of only 2.7 seconds, which shaves 0.2 seconds from its predecessor’s zero-to-100 time, while naught to 200 km/h rips past in just 8.9 seconds, this new model a full second quicker than the old Turbo S.

Possibly even more impressive, the new 911 Turbo S is a tenth of a second quicker from zero to 100 km/h than the outgoing GT2 RS, that model a 700-horsepower racetrack dominator. Take note, 911 Turbo S Cabriolet buyers will lose a tenth of a second in the opposite direction, but this still makes the convertible as fast as a GT2 RS, so it certainly won’t cause its owner embarrassment. Without doubt the drop-top will be ideal for hearing the new sport exhaust system too, which incorporates adjustable flaps that promise the kind of distinctive soundtrack only a Porsche flat-six can provide.

An Imperial performance spec worth noting is the Turbo S’ 10.5-second drag strip dash down the quarter mile, which is impressive to say the least, while owners fortunate enough to drive their cars on Europe’s speed limitless Autobahns will feasibly be able to max out at 330 km/h (205 mph) in either Coupe or Cabriolet body style, albeit with the cloth top upright in the latter model.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo S
The new Turbo S is wider than its predecessor, which should result in even more high-speed stability through curves.

Keeping such speeds in check are standard carbon-ceramic brakes featuring 10-piston front calipers, while control is further improved upon with a larger rear wing that, together with the pneumatically extendable front spoiler, provides 15 percent greater downforce than the outgoing Turbo S.

The new Turbo S is also wider than the outgoing model by 45 mm above the front axle, measuring 1,840 mm across, and 20 mm over the rear axle, which spans 1,900 mm across. This should improve stability, while Porsche has also modified its active suspension management system’s (PASM) software and hardware setup, dropping it down by 10 mm (0.4 in) plus providing “faster and more precisely controlled dampers” to improve “roll stability, road holding, steering behaviour and cornering speeds.”

The various functional vents added to the Turbo S’ front grille, rear fenders and back bumper are more about engine and brake cooling, mind you, not to mention styling aggression, while the rear design is enhanced further with a pair of uniquely rectangular exhaust tips that stick outward from the black centre diffuser, while the Turbo S is made to look even better thanks to a set of staggered 20-inch front and 21-inch rear lightweight alloy rims encircled by 255/35 and 315/30 Pirelli performance rubber respectively.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo S
The Turbo S interior uses nicer standard materials than lesser models.

The new Turbo S’ cabin is as comfortable as any other 911 and even more premium due to a full leather interior with carbon trim and Light Silver details, as well as a GT sport steering wheel, a big 10.9-inch centre touchscreen, a new Porsche Track Precision app within that centre display that comes as part of the Sport Chrono package, Bose surround-sound audio, and 18-way power-adjustable sport seats.

You’ll be able to order an all-new 2021 911 Turbo S next month, with deliveries starting later this year. Pricing will start at $231,700 plus freight and fees for the Coupe and $246,300 for the Cabriolet.

And now, for your viewing pleasure, enjoy the following Porsche supplied videos:

 

The new Porsche 911 Turbo S: The peak of driving emotion (2:28):

 

 

The all new Porsche 911 Turbo S. Relentless. (1:02):

 

 

Livestream: new Porsche 911 Turbo S Premiere (14:56):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo and video credits: Porsche 

CarCostCanada

Porsche reveals new 394 hp 718 Cayman and Boxster GTS 4.0

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
The upcoming 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 gets similar blackened exterior trim to other GTS models. (Photo: Porsche)

It was only a couple of weeks after Porsche put out a press release announcing Canadian pricing, features and specs for their new 718 Cayman T and 718 Boxster T lightweight performance models, plus details about the base, S, GT4 and Spyder variants of the same updated 2020 Cayman and Boxster, and surprisingly the upcoming 2021 718 GTS was (and still is) all over the interweb.

Up until the current 2020 model year, fourth-generation Cayman and Boxster models were only available with turbocharged four-cylinder powerplants, but thanks to the new GT4 and Spyder a formidable 4.0-litre six-cylinder engine was added to the mix. Now, hot on the heels of those two top-tier 718 models, Porsche is announcing the refreshed 2021 718 Cayman GTS and 718 Boxster GTS with horizontally opposed six-cylinder power as well.

Those who follow all things Porsche will know that the brand’s GTS trim, while not necessarily the fastest in a given model line, will be one of the sportiest thanks to blacked out exterior trim and unique aero upgrades, powertrain improvements, suspension modifications, and more often than not a curb weight reduction, and the new 2021 718 GTS takes all of the above to new extremes.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
Fabulous looking 2021 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 should go as good as it looks. (Photo: Porsche)

The outgoing 718 GTS lineup, which was with us from model years 2018 to 2019, already put out an impressive 365-horsepower and 317 lb-ft of torque, but its power came from a 2.5-litre turbocharged flat-four. Sure it was 500 cubic centimetres larger than the 2.0-litre turbo-four in the 718’s base, S and T trims, while making 65 extra horsepower and 37 more lb-ft of torque, but it still wasn’t anywhere near as capable as the naturally aspirated 4.0-litre H-6 in this new GTS.

Porschephiles will already be well aware of the just-mentioned GT4 and Spyder models, particularly about their shared six-cylinder powerplant that boasts 414 horsepower, and while it’s down some 20 horsepower in this new GTS, it still makes a formidable 394 horsepower and an identical 309 pound-feet of torque.

That’s superb performance from a trim that will soon slot between both 718 T models priced at $74,400 for the coupe and $76,800 for the convertible, and the two new top-line cars that start at $110,500 for the Spyder and $113,800 for the GT4. The new engine, which revs all the way up to 7,800 rpm, makes Porsche’s renowned six-cylinder bark and therefore should appeal to the countless diehard fans of the German brand, while the melodic notes emanating from the engine compartment behind the seats get improved upon by a standard twin-tailpipe sport exhaust system.

2021 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 4.0
The new 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 makes 394 hp from a new H-6 engine. (Photo: Porsche)

While fuel efficiency probably isn’t the first reason someone chooses a premium sports car, the new engine includes cylinder deactivation dubbed adaptive cylinder control, a technology that alternately shuts off one of its two cylinder banks under low loads, while the direct injection system uses piezo injectors plus a variable intake system to enhance efficiency further while also improving performance.

Like the sporty 718 T models that we covered in this publication in early January, the new 718 GTS adds standard performance items like a mechanical limited-slip differential, Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), and the Sport Chrono Package with a special Porsche Track Precision App featuring a lap timer.

Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package provides a handy “push-to-pass” style Sport Response button in the middle of the steering wheel-mounted rotating drive mode switch, as well as Launch Control with the optional seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK gearbox.

When using their base six-speed manual transmission, however, both new 2021 718 GTS models sprint from zero to 100 km/h in just 4.5 seconds, paring 0.1 seconds from the outgoing 718 GTS’s acceleration time, while the two only 0.1 seconds slower to 100 km/h than the ultra-hot 718 GT4 and Spyder.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
The new 718 GTS 4.0 models are filled with suede-like Alcantara surfaces. (Photo: Porsche)

Additionally, the two 718 GTS models increase their top track speeds by 3 km/h to 293 km/h—the GT4 and Spyder manage a respective 304 and 301 km/h. Porsche hasn’t announced performance numbers for the new 718 GTS with its available PDK gearbox, but the dual-clutch paddle-shift actuated transmission slices 0.2 seconds from the GT4 and Spyder’s zero to 100km/h sprint time, so we can expect something similar from the GTS.

Together with the new 718 GTS’ accelerative advantages, a bevy of standard upgrades also make for greater agility around corners, like Porsche Active Drivetrain Mounts (PADM) that integrate dynamic hard and soft transmission mounts to reduce vibration and therefore improve performance, plus the new model’s special Satin-Gloss Black-painted 20-inch alloys encircled by staggered-width 235/35 front and 265/35 rear tires make sure the new 718 models remain glued to the tarmac below.

Porsche’s Active Suspension Management (PASM) electronic damping system also comes standard, the technology instantly adjusting for irregular road surfaces, weather conditions, and changes to driving styles, all depending on whether Normal, Sport, Sport Plus or Individual driving modes are selected.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
An available GTS interior package adds a red tachometer dial at centre. (Photo: Porsche)

The two 718 GTS models also get a 20-millimetre drop in suspension height when compared to lesser trims, the 718 T duo aside, lowering their centres of gravity for improved control all-round. The base cast-iron brakes are larger in diameter too, up to 350 mm in front and 33 mm at the rear, resulting in quicker stopping times. Just in case you want to slow down even faster, Porsche provides its usual upgrade to composite ceramic brakes.

In order to visually separate the new GTS models from other 718 trims, Porsche has added dark grey “GTS 4.0” decals to each door, while other styling upgrades include plenty of darkened exterior accents such as a black front lip spoiler, an all-black lower front fascia including a special Sport Design air intake, blackened front fog lamp lenses and taillights, plus a redesigned rear bumper cap and black chrome exhaust tips. Of course, we can’t forget about those glossy black 20-inch alloy wheels mentioned earlier either. 

The 718 GTS’s cabin features a GT sport steering wheel, plus a scripted “GTS” logo at the centre of the primary instrument cluster’s rev counter, while woven carbon trim highlights the instrument panel and middle console, and dark grey Alcantara provides plush grip to the steering wheel, the centre console, the gear shift knob and surrounding skirt, each door insert and all of the armrests, plus the centre panels of the standard sport seats, while each A-pillar gets wrapped in the soft suede-like material too, as does the roof liner in the hardtop coupe.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0
Both this 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 and the Cayman coupe version are brilliantly fun around corners. (Photo: Porsche)

An available GTS interior package lets you choose between contrasting Carmine Red or chalk grey/beige Crayon for the tachometer gauge’s face, the seatbelts, the floor mat borders, and the cabin’s decorative stitching, including embroidered “GTS” logos on each headrest.

The Porsche Communication Management (PCM) centre touchscreen is standard as usual, measuring 7.0 inches and housing plenty of functions pulled up from lower end trims, plus of course the previously noted Track Precision App. This application originated in motorsport, and is downloadable to your Apple or Android smartphone. It provides performance-related data on the GTS’ centre display while on the track, and simultaneously records said data on your device for analysis after leaving the circuit.

The PCM also incorporates a navigation system with real-time traffic information, optional voice control, and Porsche Connect. Additionally, music aficionados will be happy to learn that an available Bose surround sound system can improve on the standard audio system, while Burmester surround sound audio takes the listening experience to an entirely new level.

You’ll be able to order the new 2021 718 Cayman GTS 4.0 and 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 from your Porsche retailer by the summer of 2020, with deliveries following in the fall.

Until that happens, be sure to watch the videos below:

 

The all new 718 GTS 4.0. More of what you love. (1:52):

 

Porsche GTS. More of what you love. (1:30):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche