Porsche rings in first decade of Panamera availability with new 10 Years Edition

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
Sensational looking gold on black 10 Years Edition can be had in other body colours too. (Photo: Porsche)

Take a look at your phone, or maybe your partner’s. Is it rimmed in gold? The colour of royalty, jewellery and all things decadent was a bit out of fashion for the past few decades, with most watches and trinkets finished in platinum, white gold, silver or (ahem) stainless steel, but more recently gold has made a comeback, now blinging up our electronic devices, accessories and even our cars.

Thoughts of glittering gold adorned Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz coupes and convertibles might be a painful a memory for some, so don’t worry, the new 2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition, which celebrates a full decade of the four-door coupe’s production, uses a softer hue dubbed White Gold Metallic that’s tastefully applied to the 21-inch Panamera Sport Design alloy wheels as well as a special “Panamera10” insignia painted onto the front doors, while simultaneously getting etched into the door treadplates and inlaid within the instrument panel inside.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
Exclusive “White Gold Metallic” painted 21-inch alloys and “Panamera10″ logos enhance exterior styling. (Photo: Porsche)

A number of global markets will be offering the new Panamera 10 Years Edition package for the Sport Turismo body style, but Porsche Canada will only make the stylish new upgrade available with its regular four-door design, particularly with its base Panamera, all-wheel drive Panamera 4, and electrified Panamera 4 E-Hybrid. This said Porsche is only providing prices for the latter two trims, with the Panamera 4 10 Years Edition beginning at $122,000 plus freight and fees, which is a $17,400 increase when compared to the regular Panamera 4, and the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid 10 Years Edition that starts at $132,700, a $14,900 increase over the regular base 4 E-Hybrid.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
The 10 Years Edition interior is all black other than for gold contrast stitching. (Photo: Porsche)

While the cars in Porsche’s launch photos are black, all the usual standard and optional Panamera 4 and 4 E-Hybrid colours are available with the 10 Years Edition, while the same can be said for the interior, although you may want to stay with the unique model’s black cabin with contrasting White Gold stitching, as you’ll be forced to pay more for alternative two-tone colourways.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
Elegant “Panamera10″ script adorns the instrument panel. (Photo: Porsche)

You can learn more about 2020 Panamera 10 Years Edition packages, options and pricing right here on CarCostCanada, where you can also find out about any available rebates and otherwise difficult to find dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

Standard Panamera 4 10 Years Edition features that haven’t been mentioned yet include LED matrix headlamps, ParkAssist with Surround View, Lane Change Assist with Lane Keep Assist (LKA), 14-way comfort seats featuring Porsche crests on their headrests, soft-close doors, plus Bose surround-sound audio, while standard performance features include Porsche’s adaptive three-chamber air suspension with Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and Power Steering Plus. Those choosing the hybrid will also benefit from a more capable 7.2-kW on-board charger instead of the usual base 3.6-kW charge system.

2020 Porsche Panamera 10 Years Edition
The special edition gets the “Panamera10″ logo on the doorsills too. (Photo: Porsche)

The Panamera 4 10 Years Edition also comes standard with Porsche’s 3.0-litre turbo-V6 engine that makes 330 horsepower, whereas the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid 10 Years Edition joins a twin-turbo 2.9-litre V6 up with an electric motor for a combined total of 457 horsepower.

The first examples of the Panamera 10 Years Edition should start arriving at Canadian Porsche dealerships during the first quarter of 2020, so be sure to call to your local Porsche retailer to learn more.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Porsche introduces affordable new Taycan 4S

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
New 4S trim brings the new 2020 Taycan down to a more palatable level of affordability. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche revealed two final production Taycan EVs last month, but without doubt some potential buyers found the Turbo and Turbo S models’ respective $173,900 and $213,900 price tags a bit too rich for their budgets. Of course, the Stuttgart, Germany-based performance brand promised more affordable versions to follow, and therefore the $119,400 Taycan 4S is upon us. Priced much closer to the $108,990 base Tesla Model S, this is the EV “volume” model Porsche needs.

So what does the $55k (or $95k) buy you? Performance. Wheels aside there’s no obvious difference to exterior or interior design, or materials quality for that matter, but in place of the Taycan Turbo’s 671 horsepower, 627 lb-ft of torque, and launch control-assisted 3.2-second run to 100 km/h sprint from standstill to 100 km/h, or the Turbo S model’s even more outrageous 750 horsepower, 774 lb-ft of torque, and 2.8-second second run to 100 km/h, the new 4S uses makes due with “just” 522 horsepower, 472 lb-ft of torque and a 4.0-second dash to the 100-km/h mark.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
Great looking and brilliantly quick, the new Taycan 4S should be a popular EV. (Photo: Porsche)

A Performance Battery Plus package is available, boosting output to 562 horsepower and torque to 479 lb-ft for a nominal difference in naught to 100 km/h sprints (although Porsche rates it at 4.0 seconds as well), yet this upgraded Taycan 4S’ shoots from standstill to 160 km/h in a scant 8.5 seconds instead of dawdling along at just 8.7 seconds. Both 4S power units limit the Taycan’s terminal velocity to 250 km/h, which incidentally is 30 km/h less speedy than the Turbo or Turbo S.

Under the Taycan 4S floorboards are 79.2 kilowatt-hours of high-voltage lithium-ion battery capable of 407 km (253 miles) of estimated range, as per the European WLTP rating system, while the enhanced 93.4-kWh Performance Plus battery provides about 463 km (288 miles) of range. This compares well with next to the Taycan Turbo’s 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 mile) claimed range and the Turbo S’ 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 mile) estimates.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
These unique LED headlights set the Taycan apart. (Photo: Porsche)

No matter the trim, the Taycan uses an industry-first 800-volt electrical architecture that makes for faster recharging due to a charge-rate of 225 kW with the Performance Battery or 270 kW for the upgraded Performance Battery Plus, making 22.5-minute 5-to-80-percent refills possible with all power unit specs. Regular 400-volt high-speed DC recharging happens at 50 kW, but an available booster can increase the charge-rate to 150 kW. You can also use the standard AC charge system at any J1772-compatible charging station, or plug it in at in at home, but charging times will be considerably longer.

Topping the Taycan up is made easier via Porsche’s new Charging Planner, which allows you to plot your route by mapping out ideal charging stations along the way. For instance, it will choose a quicker 270-kW station that can save you time when compared to a regular 50-kW DC charger, even if the quicker charger necessitates a detour from the shortest route. The Charging Planner also preconditions the battery to 20 degrees Celsius, which is best for the fastest possible charge-rate.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
The singular body-wide tail lamp is standard fare on Porsches these days. (Photo: Porsche)

Like the Taycan Turbo and Turbo S, the new 4S incorporates an all-wheel drivetrain featuring front and back axle-mounted permanently excited synchronous motors plus a two-speed transmission in the rear. Additionally, Porsche’s centrally networked 4D Chassis Control system provides real-time analysis and synchronization for the Taycan’s standard electronic damper control Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) enhanced three-chamber adaptive air suspension, which should result in impressive road-holding capability.

What’s more, Taycan customers should enjoy improvements in reliability over Tesla Model S owners, thanks to Porsche designing a completely new hairpin winding technique for the electric motor stators’ copper solenoid coils, this allowing for a copper fill factor of 70 percent compared to 45 percent when wound using the conventional method, all of which results in stronger performance and less heat.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
The Taycan is family friendly thanks to four doors. (Photo: Porsche)

Monitoring the Taycan’s mobility status is a wholly digital primary gauge cluster filled with colourful high-resolution graphics and integrated within a free-standing, curved binnacle that pulls styling cues from the brand’s legendary 911. Just to the right, the Taycan 4S’ standard 10.9-inch high-definition capacitive infotainment touchscreen sits atop the centre stack. Most will also want the optional front passenger display that was introduced last month with the Taycan Turbo and Turbo S, this innovative addition extending the graphical experience across the rest of the instrument panel.

Features in mind, the Taycan 4S receives standard Black or White exterior paint, a unique front fascia design, a glossy black painted rear diffuser and side skirts, LED headlamps with Porsche Dynamic Light System Plus (PDLS Plus), 19-inch five-spoke Taycan S Aero alloys, red-painted six-piston front and four-piston rear brake calipers (instead of the yellow-painted calipers found on the two Turbo models) biting down on 360-mm front and 358-mm rear discs, regenerative brakes (with a maximum regenerative force of 0.39 Gs and recuperation of up to 265 kWh), proximity keyless entry, ambient interior lighting, partial leather upholstery, eight-way power-adjustable front seats with driver’s side memory and more, but take note this base model won’t go into production until June, 2020. Before then, the $1,690 panoramic glass sunroof replaces the standard aluminum roof, while the optional Porsche Mobile Charger Plus isn’t available yet either, which leaves the standard Porsche Mobile Charger Connect system for early adapters.

2020 Porsche Taycan 4S
The Taycan 4S comes well equipped. (Photo: Porsche)

Available Taycan 4S options include a bevy of $910 metallic exterior colours, including the Taycan’s Frozen Blue launch colour shown in the photos, plus bright Mamba Green and deep Gentian Blue, as well as one $3,590 special colour, Carmine Red. Additionally, Porsche is offering two sets of optional 20-inch alloys and three 21-inch wheels, all ranging from $2,710 to $10,010, while the car’s black partial leather cabin can be upgraded to $4,710 black or multiple $5,360 two-tone leather, $7,490 solid or $8,150 two-tone Club leather, or alternatively $4,710 solid or $5,360 two-tone leather-free Race-Tex, the latter Porsche-first incorporating recycled materials that reduce the Taycan’s impact on the environmental.

The new Porsche should be near silent at speed too, due to an amazing Cd of 0.22, plus this ultra-aerodynamic design also minimizes energy use.

Porschephiles wanting a taller SUV model instead of this road-hugging four-door coupe will be glad to know that a crossover coupe dubbed Cross Turismo is on the way next year. It’s designed to go up against the Jaguar I-Pace, Tesla Model X and whatever else comes down the pike by then, so we can all look forward to that.

You can order the new 2020 Taycan 4S right now, however, just like its Turbo siblings, while its arrival date is set for summer 2020.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

New 2020 Porsche Macan Turbo almost 10 percent more powerful

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
The 2020 Macan Turbo receives a new front end design and plenty of other styling tweaks too. (Photo: Porsche)

The 2020 Macan has received such a thorough upgrade that many consider it more like newly designed generation, instead of a mid-cycle refresh. Porsche even revised its suspension, while also restyling its front and rear fascias, adding new standard LED headlamps and taillights, with those in the rear helping to give it a completely new look when viewed from behind. Now, instead of two distinct rear lighting clusters, the lenses to each side are bound together by a thin strip in between, similar to other vehicles in Porsche’s updated lineup like the entry-level 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster sports coupe and convertible, the mid-size Panamera four-door coupe, mid-size Cayenne SUV, the iconic 911, and entirely new Taycan all-electric four-door coupe. The 2020 Macan’s interior has been updated too, with a much larger standard 10.9-inch high-definition Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen display atop the centre stack. 

The renewed Macan Turbo will arrive later this year as a 2020 model, but can be ordered from your local Porsche retailer now for $94,200. If that’s a bit rich for your budget, you may be just as happy with the more fuel-efficient 2020 Macan or the seriously sporty Macan S, both base and mid-range models having arrived earlier this year, the most affordable trim starting at $56,100, with the S bridging the gap at $63,600. 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
New 20-inch Turbo wheels enhance the 2020 refresh. (Photo: Porsche)

The base Macan comes equipped with a 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine making 248 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque, capable of shooting it from zero to 100km/h in a mere 6.7 seconds, or 6.5 with its optional Sport Chrono Package, while its top speed is 227 km/h. 

Of note, all Macans feature a fully automated seven-speed dual-clutch PDK transmission with steering wheel paddle shifters, plus Porsche Traction Management (PTM) active all-wheel drive with an electronic map-controlled multi-plate clutch is also standard, as is an automatic brake differential (ABD) and anti-slip regulation (ASR). 

The second-rung Macan S sports a massive jump in straight-line performance due to a 3.0-litre V6 turbo behind its reshaped front grille, pushing 348 horsepower and 352 lb-ft of torque down to all wheels for a lickety-split acceleration time of just 5.3 seconds to 100km/h, or 5.1 with the Sport Chrono Package, while its new terminal velocity is 254 km/h. 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
The biggest change externally is a one-piece body-wide LED taillight cluster. (Photo: Porsche)

Yes, those Macan S performance numbers have been improved for 2020, so Porsche couldn’t arrive with a new Macan Turbo held back by the same engine specs. Instead, the new Turbo gets nearly 10 percent more thrust, its 2.9-litre twin-turbo V6 good for 34 more horsepower at 434, while torque remains the same at 406 lb-ft. This shaves 0.3 seconds from its zero to 100km/h sprint time, the result being 4.5 seconds or 4.3 with its Sport Chrono Package, while its terminal velocity rises by 5 km/h to 270 km/h. 

A few standard Macan Turbo performance features now include one-inch bigger 20-inch Macan Turbo alloys, Porsche Surface Coated Brakes (PSCB) that manage stops faster than the SUV’s outgoing standard braking setup, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) dampers, a sport exhaust system, and more, while a bevy of performance options include (but aren’t limited to) a height-adjustable air suspension system with rolling pistons and new shock absorber hydraulics, Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV +), and Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB). 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo
Along with the 10.9-inch centre display all 2020 Macans receive, the Turbo gets Alcantara roof pillars and headliner, 18-way front seats, and more. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 2020 Macan Turbo adds some special touches inside as well, such as standard Alcantara-wrapped roof pillars and roofliner, 18-way front Adaptive Sport Seats with memory, a 665-watt Bose Surround Sound audio system boasting 14 speakers, and the list goes on. 

Its list of convenience and luxury options is long too, and includes a GT Sport steering wheel, wireless charging that comes in a package with a special Smartphone Compartment, semi-autonomous self-parking and traffic assistance systems, and more. 

The new 2020 Macan Turbo can be ordered now at your local Porsche dealer, and will arrive here in Canada toward the end of this year, while you can drive away in a new 2020 Macan and Macan S now.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC Road Test

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Mitsubishi has made a bold move by entering an SUV-coupe into the mainstream market, but we like its new Eclipse Cross very much. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

What’s in a name? So much. I’m actually a tiny bit put off by Eclipse Cross, the name Mitsubishi is using for its new compact crossover SUV. There’s nothing particularly wrong with the two words chosen, unlike when Buick named one of their mid-size sedans after Canada’s national game that actually had another somewhat raunchy colloquial meaning in French, but it sends my mind back to a better (automotive) time when personal 2+2 sports coupes like the Japanese brand’s own Eclipse, Honda’s Prelude, Nissan’s 240SX, and Toyota’s Celica, amongst myriad others, were what many of us longed to cruise the strip in on Friday and Saturday nights before autocrossing on Sundays, but now all of these low-riding, two-door hardtops are gone, leaving us with a glut of two-box sport utilities. 

A few of these car-based crossovers are slightly more unusual, however, making this mostly practical market sector more intriguing than it might otherwise be, with the edgy new Eclipse Cross top of this category’s list of orthodox heretics. It’s a particularly good choice for buyers not requiring all of the Outlander’s cargo capacity yet wanting more get-up-and-go than an RVR, plus its sporty SUV-coupe design pulls some of the premium pizazz down from luxury juggernauts like BMW and Mercedes-Benz that offer similarly sized variants in their X4 and GLC Coupe models respectively. I’m not trying to say this commoner’s shuttle somehow measures up to such lofty Europeans, but it’s got a strut all its own and therefore deserves a level of respect for going its own way in a compact SUV class that’s more often than not safer than safe. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
It’s sloped rear roofline is joined by a very stylish combination of taillights and two rear windows. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Most brands that choose to get their funk on turn to the smallest subcompact SUV category to do so, where Mitsubishi pits its comparatively conservative RVR against more unusual entries such as the Kia Soul and Toyota C-HR (Nissan’s Juke, and before that the Cube, which was the oddest of them all, laid to rest a number of years ago, the latter replaced by the more mainstream Kicks), while, size aside, the Mazda CX-3 is closer to the Eclipse Cross as far as consumer acceptability and sporty driving dynamics go, but the larger Mitsu is the only SUV-coupe in its bigger compact segment. 

The Eclipse Cross reaches 4,405 mm (173.4 in) from nose to tail, with a 2,670 mm (105.1 in) wheelbase, while it stretches 1,805 mm (71.1 in) wide and stands 1,685 mm (66.3 in) tall. This makes its wheelbase identical to the brand’s Outlander that in fact measures 290 mm (11.4 in) longer overall, while its width is a mere 5 mm (0.2 in) thinner and height 25 mm (1.0 in) lower to the ground. This means it’s about the same size as the Outlander other than length, which combined with its sloped rear roof section, makes for a much more exciting looking SUV. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The 18-inch alloys are standard, but the LED headlamps are exclusive to this GT trim line. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As for styling, the Eclipse Cross wears Mitsubishi’s bold new “Dynamic Shield” design language rather well, better in my opinion than any other model in the lineup, other than the new 2020 RVR that takes this look to new heights. The drama continues around both sides where sculpted cutlines emerge about a third of the way through the front doors before slicing through the handles and meeting up with the lower edge of an even more enticing combination of LED tail lamps, these visually tied together by a narrow strip of lighting that separates two panes of back glass in similitude to Honda’s 2nd-generation (1988-1991) CRX or more recent (2011–2016) CR-Z, plus the Japanese brand’s defunct mid-size (2010–2015) Crosstour, although these three Hondas never included the Eclipse Cross’s light strip. Additional body sculpting along the rocker panels bends upward before rounding the rear fenders, these matching the Eclipse Cross’s muscular front fender design with a slight nod to the past (2004–2011) Endeavor mid-size crossover SUV, a long-term tester I had the pleasure of living with for more than a few months way back when. 

Framed behind a sharp looking set of standard 18-inch alloy rims on 225/55 all-season rubber is a fully independent MacPherson strut front suspension and multi-link rear setup incorporating stabilizer bars at each end, all of which combines for ample grip to keep its 1.5-litre turbo-four in control. The diminutive engine, good for 152 horsepower and 184 lb-ft of torque, sends its output through an innovative continuously variable transmission (CVT) complete with eight forward gears, or should I say simulated gears, shiftable via two of the best magnesium column-mounted paddles in the business. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
This three-part LED lighting element looks even better up close. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Why the best? Unlike most anything else in the entire industry, these longer than average paddle shifters are fixed to the steering column rather than the steering wheel, exactly like with the fabulous Evo X MR (RIP) and plenty of other Mitsubishi models, allowing accurate upshifts and downshifts even when the wheel is being turned. 

This Eclipse Cross GT moved along well when pushed hard, feeling more energetic than its horsepower rating led on, without doubt due to its sizeable torque figure. Steering effort was firmer than most other compact SUVs I’ve driven, although light enough for easy daily use, while its ride quality was a bit more rigid, yet never uncomfortable. Its firm stance helped amid tight twisting curves, the Eclipse Cross feeling rock solid when getting aggressive, but this said I wouldn’t have thought it would be as good as it is when running errands around town or otherwise driving normally, as the powertrain responds like it’s in eco mode even when it’s not. Yes, you can still press the green “Eco Mode” button on the centre console if you want an even more relaxed experience, plus the fuel savings to go with it. 

Unfortunately there’s no Sport mode, my right foot on the go-pedal the only way to extract all of the engine’s energy, and even with those aforementioned shift paddles the CVT isn’t the sportiest of transmissions (I’m being nice). It’s smooth, however, and therefore just what most buyers in this compact SUV class want, plus it’s very effective at moving this little utility down the road quickly while using as little gas as possible. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The Eclipse Cross provides a really well laid out cockpit. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

In the wet, much of the Eclipse Cross’s straight-line speed and cornering capability is directly due to its standard Super All-Wheel Control, those four words collectively designated to Mitsubishi’s all-wheel drive system, which is an advanced torque-vectoring AWD honed from decades of rally car racing. True, it’s difficult to accept that this “performance” SUV is now the sportiest model in Mitsubishi’s once very racy lineup that previously offered the superb Evo X noted earlier, an all-wheel drive super compact that easily out-handled the Subaru WRX STI of the era, but Mitsubishi’s focus has changed now, with practical SUVs front and centre, one of which is a plug-in electric that’s giving it a good green image if not much in the way of profits. 

Rather than cry over the Evo’s demise, it’s probably best to praise Mitsubishi for the Eclipse Cross’s fuel-efficiency. It’s rated at 9.6 L/100km city, 8.9 highway and 8.3 combined, which is good when compared to the segment-sales-leading Toyota RAV4 that can only manage 10.5 city, 8.3 highway and 9.5 combined, although it’s not quite as stingy on gas as the Honda CR-V’s estimated rating of 8.7 city, 7.2 highway and 8.0 combined. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The gauge cluster looks good and is easy to read in any light. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The previously noted turbocharged four-cylinder and CVT combination is identical no matter which of its three trim lines gets chosen (not including special editions), but like usual in this business Mitsubishi provided my Eclipse Cross tester in top-tier GT trim so I could experience all of its available goodies. This model hits the road for $35,998 plus freight and fees (check right here on CarCostCanada for all the pricing details, including dealer invoice pricing and rebate info that could save you thousands), and came well equipped with LED headlights, a head-up display unit, a multi-view rearview camera with active guidelines, an excellent 710-watt Rockford Fosgate Punch audio system featuring nine speakers including a 10-inch sub, a heated steering wheel, two-way heatable rear outboard seats, leather upholstery, a six-way power driver’s seat, a two-pane panoramic glass sunroof, plus more. 

This top-line GT also boasts everything from the mid-range SE trim’s available Tech Package, including auto high beams, adaptive cruise control, forward collision mitigation with pedestrian warning, lane departure warning, an auto-dimming rearview mirror with an integrated universal garage door remote, roof rails, and a stylish silver-painted lower door garnish. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Mitsubishi’s head-up display powers up out of the dash. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Items grandfathered up to GT trim from the just-noted SE include those paddle shifters mentioned earlier, plus proximity keyless entry and pushbutton start/stop, an electric parking brake (the base model uses a classic handbrake), a leather-clad steering wheel rim and shift knob, automatic headlamps, rain-sensing windshield wipers, two-zone auto HVAC (an upgrade from base trim’s single-zone automatic climate control), blind spot warning, etcetera for just $29,998, while items pulled up from $27,998 base ES trim include LED daytime running lights, fog lights, LED side mirror turn signals, LED tail lamps, a tilt and telescopic steering column, a colour multi-information display in the primary gauge package, the “ECO” mode mentioned a moment ago, micron-filtered auto climate control, two-way heatable front seats, plus more. 

Eclipse Cross interior quality is good, including a dash completely made from a premium-like pliable composite that bends all the way down to the middle portion of the instrument panel, while nice soft synthetic front door uppers add to the luxury feel, along with even plusher door inserts just below, and a comfortable set of armrests with contrast stitching. Their orange contrasting thread matches with the seat bolster stitching nicely, while all added colour is applied tastefully (unlike some in the compact SUV category). 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The infotainment system is excellent. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Mitsubishi has organized the primary instruments well, with an amply sized colour trip computer between its two conventional dials, while over on the centre stack its 7.0-inch centre display offers an upscale look. Tap, pinch and swipe finger prompts can be used in the usual smartphone/tablet-style touchscreen way, but that’s not all as Mitsubishi provides an impressive touchpad on the lower console for those who’d rather not reach all the way to the dash when entering commands. I’m impressed at this entry-level brand incorporating such a sophisticated infotainment system as standard equipment, its features and layout comparable to a number of premium SUVs on offer. 

Within the bright, graphical interface is standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, a big backup camera with active guidelines (my tester including an upgraded multi-view version), Bluetooth with audio streaming, satellite radio, two USB charging/connectivity ports, and more. 

The Eclipse Cross’s driver’s seat is comfortable, thanks to good powered adjustability. I was able to set up an ideal driving position due to ample rake and reach via the tilt and telescopic steering wheel, but alas the seatback didn’t include any adjustable lumbar support. Still, its ergonomically shaped design provided good lower back comfort anyway, although as I’ve experienced during countless road trips, the ability to make periodic seat adjustments so as to ease acquired pain is important. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Along with its touchscreen functionality, the infotainment system accepts finger prompts from this handy touchpad. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The steering wheel mentioned a moment ago is nicely designed with a reasonably thick leather rim, while the ability to heat it up was appreciated. The front seat heaters cooked up a storm too, but with just two temperature settings available I found my driver’s seat was either too hot or too cold, never just right. 

The second row of seats offers up a lot of space and comfort, plus it includes a flip-down armrest in the middle that integrates the usual set of cupholders. The rear seat heaters on the backside of the front console are an easy reach, while my test model’s rear glass sunroof joined up with this SUV’s ample visibility out the rear windows for a really open and airy experience in back. 

The Eclipse Cross doesn’t offer a powered tailgate, which wouldn’t matter to me personally, but something that would truly sway my vote would be more accommodating 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks than the 60/40 division provided, or at the very least a centre pass-through so I’d be able to load skis down the middle while my rear passengers enjoyed those previously mentioned seat warmers on our way back from the mountain, but for reasoning that can only come down to cost savings, only a couple of mainstream volume-branded rivals offer this premium-level convenience. Then again, it’s not like this new Mitsubishi breaks rank when it comes to cargo flexibility, yet the automaker may want to reconsider this because it could be a leader and therefore garner sales it hasn’t been able to thus far. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
The driver’s seat is good, but it needs adjustable lumbar support. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Continuing on this practical train of thought, even this segment’s sportiest SUV has to measure up when it comes to hauling gear, so it’s good the Eclipse Cross provides plenty of luggage capacity to go along with its sizeable passenger compartment. By the numbers, the Eclipse Cross offers 640 litres (22.6 cu ft) aft of the rear seats, and 1,385 litres (48.9 cu ft) behind the front seats when the rear seatbacks are lowered, making it 26 litres (0.9 cubic feet) more voluminous for cargo than the subcompact RVR when both model’s rear seats are in use, albeit 17 litres (0.6 cubic feet) less so when those seatbacks are dropped down. Hence, the compromise of a sporty SUV-coupe compared to a more conventional crossover SUV. 

When comparing the Eclipse Cross to its bigger Outlander brother, which is closer in most external dimensions, it’s a full 328 litres (11.6 cubic feet) less accommodating behind its back row, and a whopping 407 litres (14.4 cubic feet) less so when both SUVs’ have their rear seatbacks lowered. Mitsubishi helpfully includes a removable cargo floor to expand on cargo space by unveiling a fairly large stowage compartment underneath. 

On the negative, when I pulled those rear seatbacks up so they could be used again, I found their headrests almost impossible to yank up from their deep-set lowered positions. It really took all of my strength, and while I’m no Charles Atlas, the level of effort needed bordered on the outrageous. I’m sure the headrest mounts would free up in time, but this presupposes that an owner is capable of pulling them up in the first place. I recommend you find out if you can do so even before going on a test drive, and also that Mitsubishi dealers make sure their service departments check this as part of their pre-delivery inspection regimen. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Love all the light shining from above. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Now that I’m griping, I experienced way too many annoying creaks and squeaks from the rear when underway. It’s possible this has something to do with the removable cargo floor noted earlier, but I doubt it. It’s more likely due to the fitment of the rear sunroof, or even more likely the rear seats, as some of the squeaking sounds seemed more like leather rubbing together. Therefore I’d really like to test the Eclipse Cross with its fabric seats, and find out just where all the noise is coming from. 

On a more positive note, I liked having separate power sunshade controls for both front and rear sunroofs, as it allowed rear passengers more overhead light while front occupants were shaded, or vice versa. 

Another thumbs up goes to the rear wiper that engages automatically when reversing if the windshield wipers are on, while the previously noted head-up display (HUD) was a helpful tool being that it provides key info directly in front of the driver where it can be seen easily without taking eyes off the road. Rather than projecting images directly on the windshield, which is the usual way an HUD works, Mitsubishi’s design is near identical to the HUD used by Mazda, in that a small transparent plastic reflector screen powers up atop the instrument hood, but the only problem with the Eclipse Cross version is that it’s somewhat distracting. It doesn’t really block the view ahead, but it kind of interrupts the mind’s eye. I did get used to it after a few days, to the point that it didn’t bother me at all, but I could understand if some others didn’t like it. 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Rear seat roominess is good and the backrests are comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

After pointing out the various Eclipse Cross positives and negatives that you may or may not agree with, I think we can all commend Mitsubishi for its industry-leading 5-year or 100,000-km basic (almost bumper-to-bumper) warranty and 10-year or 160,000-km powertrain coverage. No other manufacturer comes close to providing as much peace of mind, with the majority providing 2 years or 40,000 km less basic coverage, and 5 years or 60,000 km less powertrain warranty. This, and the fact that Mitsubishi is one of the more well respected automakers in global markets due to superb engineering and better than average dependability, makes its excellent warranty a top selling point that every consumer should factor in when purchasing a new vehicle. 

Mitsubishi should also be commended for creating the Eclipse Cross’s compact SUV-coupe niche within its mainstream volume-branded class. True, the model’s year-to-date 2019 sales figure of 4,159 units (as of Sept 2019) leave it dead last in its segment, but when combining that number with Mitsubishi’s second-to-last Outlander sales of 8,568 units, its 12,727-unit overall brand impact on the compact SUV segment positions it above Subaru, GMC and Kia; an impressive accomplishment for one of Canada’s newest automotive brands (Mitsubishi Motor Sales was established here in 2002). 

2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross GT S-AWC
Most won’t mind the load hauling compromise, but the rear headrests are really hard to adjust. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This, combined with the Outlander PHEV, the only plug-in hybrid in the volume-branded compact SUV segment, shows that innovation remains a key component to Mitsubishi’s continued market presence and future growth, and despite some of us lamenting the loss of performance-first models like that Evo mentioned earlier, or the Eclipse sports coupe this crossover SUV pays tribute to, we need to acknowledge Bob Dylan’s famous line, the times they are a changin, and appreciate that only those willing to adapt will survive when times get tough. 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credit: Karen Tuggay

Mitsubishi dramatically refreshes 2020 RVR

2020 Mitsubishi RVR
Mitsubishi has aligned its 2020 RVR styling with the rest of the brand’s SUVs, and by so doing given its front fascia a dramatic new look. (Photo: Mitsubishi)

Mitsubishi’s RVR has long become a fixture on Canadian roads, having entered our market as far back as 2010 when its handful of subcompact crossover SUV rivals included Honda’s Element, Jeep’s Compass and Patriot, Kia’s Soul, Nissan’s Cube and Juke, plus Scion’s xB. 

Initially the little utility did quite well, achieving third place in category sales during its first full year before attaining best-in-class deliveries for 2013, but nearly a decade of minimal updates, other than reworked grille and lower front fascia designs for the 2016 model year, have resulted in so-so sales ever since. 

Mitsubishi hopes to change this with its much more dramatically refreshed 2020 RVR. Stylistic similarities to the edgy new Eclipse Cross were obviously intended, but the new RVR provides standard LED headlamps plus a pair of truly unique standard four-lens LED daytime running lamps, while down each side is an eye-catching chromed front fender “vent”, all before the SUV’s hind end gets new standard LED taillight clusters above a new bumper with more intricate detailing. This said the 2020 RVR’s highlight item might be the new standard 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen found in its updated interior. 

2020 Mitsubishi RVR
These standard LED taillights join standard LED headlamps and DRLs up front. (Photo: Mitsubishi)

To clear up an confusion, the RVR is also called Outlander Sport south of the 49th and ASX in the Europe markets and elsewhere. This new version was initially introduced at the Geneva motor show in March before arriving here in Canada, and now that we have pricing and all other details on the automaker’s Canadian retail site, it’s clear to see that there’s more about the redesign than some stylish new duds. 

The 2020 RVR is also a better value, thanks to its base price staying at $22,998 plus destination and fees, yet its many new updates being included in the standard fare. On that note the 8.0-inch Smartphone Link Display Audio centre touchscreen also includes standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, plus a bigger backup camera. 

Additionally, all new 2020 RVR trims get heatable power-adjustable exterior mirrors, variable intermittent wipers, heated front seats, Bluetooth, anti-theft security, a rooftop rear spoiler, hill start assist, traction control, active stability control, a brake override system, plus more. 

2020 Mitsubishi RVR
A refreshed interior gets a new standard 8-inch infotainment touchscreen with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and a bigger rearview camera. (Photo: Mitsubishi)

Mitsubishi also makes its advanced All Wheel Control (AWC) all-wheel drive system more affordable this year, by providing it in new ES AWC trim that starts at only $25,498. 

Mitsubishi offers seven trim levels for 2020, with the just-above-base $25,298 SE FWD now providing standard blindspot warning with rear cross-traffic alert, a combination only offered on pricier trims last year. 

The all-wheel drive SE AWC, at $27,998, incorporates the same fuel-efficient continuously variable transmission (CVT) as its more entry-level siblings, yet replaces the model’s 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine for a larger 2.4-litre version, which brings output up from 148 horsepower and 145 lb-ft of torque to a potent 168 horsepower and 167 lb-ft of torque, while this model also features standard LED fog lights. 

Above this is $29,798 SEL AWC trim that replaces the 16-inch alloy wheels to a new sportier set of 18-inch alloys, while also adding plusher, more pampering microsuede upholstery. 

2020 Mitsubishi RVR
The RVR should continue offering strong performance thanks to carryover 148 and 168 hp 4-cylinder engines. (Photo: Mitsubishi)

Instead of the SEL AWC you may want to consider moving up to the $30,798 Limited Edition AWC (dubbed Black Edition last year), which provides a black headliner, a heated steering wheel rim, and a centre console kneepad with contrast red stitching. 

The blackened headliner and heatable steering wheel are included in the top-line $33,998 GT AWC too (Mitsubishi has discontinued use of the “GT Premium” nameplate for 2020), as well as a new chrome beltline moulding. 

Finally, new colour choices include standard Oak Brown and Sunshine Orange, which join carryover standard colours Sterling Silver and Titanium Grey, whereas a new Red Diamond exterior paint colour becomes available for $450, alongside $300 optional Labrador Black, Octane Blue, and Pearl White exterior paints. 

“RVR is our number one selling nameplate,” stated Juyu Jeon, president and CEO, Mitsubishi Motor Sales of Canada, Inc. “As an entry-level SUV, RVR has done the important job of introducing new customers to the brand and these customers are staying and growing with Mitsubishi Motors. We believe with its new bold, rugged look, Canadians will want to revisit why RVR has become a Canadian favourite for Mitsubishi.” 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Mitsubishi

New 2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet just in time for winter

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The 2020 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet is a true all-season convertible. (Photo: Porsche)

This winter will be “colder than normal,” says The Old Farmer’s Almanac in this year’s Annual Weather Summary for Southern British Columbia, while “temperatures, precipitation, and snowfall will be above normal” in Southern Ontario. 

Yikes! Ready for the dark days of winter yet? Anyone with a reasonably good memory will get a chill when thinking back to the past two winter seasons, while February of 2019 was Vancouver’s coldest on record ever. Now, early storms are already rearing their ugly heads across Canada, bringing these bitter memories back earlier than expected, but you won’t need to concern yourself about getting around if you ante up for Porsche’s all-new redesigned 2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé or 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The new Carrera 4 sports rectangular tailpipes for a unique look. (Photo: Porsche)

The Stuttgart-based performance/luxury brand has been introducing its fresh new 911 throughout the year, and its latest Carrera 4 models couldn’t have timed their arrival better. Using the identical 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged six-cylinder “boxer” engine as found in the new Carrera 2, making 370 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque, the new Carrera 4 Coupe blasts from standstill to 100 km/h a scant 0.1 seconds faster than the Carrera 2 at just 4.5 seconds when shifted by its seven-speed manual transmission, or 4.3 seconds when mated up to its paddle-shift infused eight-speed PDK gearbox. Even better, the Carrera 4 can accomplish the same feat in a mere 4.1 seconds when Porsche’s Sport Chrono Package enhances the dual-clutch automated transmission. 

Furthermore, only 9.7 seconds is required to zip from zero to 160 km/h with the manual gearbox, or 9.3 seconds for the PDK, while the two model respectively top out at 292 and 290 km/h. If the convertible is your thing, the new Carrera 4 Cabriolet takes just 0.2 seconds longer to achieve each timed exercise, while its top speed is a lofty 289 km/h. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
Fabulous looking new Carrera 4 Coupé is even more stable in inclement weather than the previous generation. (Photo: Porsche)

Identical to the 2020 Carrera 4S released earlier this year, the redesigned Carrera 4 features a new water-cooled front differential, which includes reinforced clutches that increase load capacity and durability. Together with Porsche Traction Management (PTM), the new front axle drive system enhances the Carrera 4’s grip in slippery situations, while also improving performance in dry conditions. 

Additionally, all 2020 911 Carrera buyers get an innovative new Wet mode as part of the upgraded steering wheel-mounted driving mode selector. The smart technology automatically maintains greater control over slippery road surfaces when turned on, while all new 911 trims improve safety further via standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection, while a high-resolution rearview camera plus rear parking assist come standard too. 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
The new 911 incorporates all of Porsche’s most advanced electronics. (Photo: Porsche)

Also standard, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) improves high-speed handling thanks to electronically variable dampers with both Normal and Sport settings, while Porsche Torque Vectoring, which comes standard with the pricier S and 4S, is now offered as optional equipment when ordering the new Carrera 4 Coupe and Cabriolet. 

Other features include the optional Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system, plus staggered front and rear 20- and 21-inch alloy rims, while staggered 19- and 20-inch alloy wheels come standard. 

As for exterior styling, you’ll have a difficult time trying to spot a Carrera 4 when it’s driving toward you, but you might catch its italicized “4” on the rear deck lid when it passes you by, or alternatively see if two rectangular tailpipes have replaced the base model’s twin oval tips. This isn’t an exact science, however, as it’s possible for Carrera 4 customers to purchase an available set of dual oval exhaust pipes, but take note if a quad of round ports are filling out the 911’s lower rear apron it’s a Carrera 2S or 4S. Got that? 

2020 911 Carrera 4 Coupé and Cabriolet
These redesigned sport seats, standard with both Carrera 2 and Carrera 4 models, are classic Porsche designs. (Photo: Porsche)

This said nothing is so obviously unique inside either 911 Carrera 2 or 4. Both models arrive standard with the German brand’s almost entirely digital primary gauge cluster, with only its classic analogue tachometer at centre, while the new 10.9-inch Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen infotainment interface fills the top portion of the centre stack, featuring enhanced connectivity no less. Hardly last on an extensive list of standard features, both 911 Carreras feature the same reportedly comfortable and supportive redesigned seats. 

The fresh new 2020 Porsche Carrera 4 Coupé is now available to order from $111,900, plus freight and fees, as is the Carrera 4 Cabriolet, start at $126,000. 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche

2020 Jeep Compass North 4×4 Road and Trail Test

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
The stylish Jeep Compass looks even better off-road. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

When first hearing news that Jeep would be cancelling its boxy Patriot and keeping its somewhat sleeker Compass, I wasn’t happy. It’s not that I loved the Patriot in any great way, but it was a lot more intriguing than the first-gen Compass, at least to me, plus it provided a bit of off-road capability. In spite of my silent opposition, Jeep followed through by discontinuing the Patriot in 2017, but the totally new second-generation Compass that followed that year as a 2018 model quickly made up for any concern, thanks to much more appealing lines, a wholly upgraded interior and a significant improvement in drivetrain specs. 

The first-generation Compass was actually available for a full decade, from 2006 to 2016, with just one major facelift in 2011. That’s when Jeep transformed it from its Liberty/Wrangler-esque styling roots to a much classier Grand Cherokee wannabe, at least up front, but this entirely new second-gen Compass adopts even more design cues from the since-revised and very attractive Grand Cherokee, resulting in a great looking compact crossover SUV. I can’t continue one without noting how much the rear end of this SUV looks like the new Volvo XC40, but in fairness to Jeep the shapely Compass arrived a full year before the new entry-level XC40, so therefore it’s more likely that Jeep influenced Volvo instead. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
The Compass is just as capable over easy backcountry roads…

Of course, Jeep has made impressions on luxury brands before. Anyone claiming Mercedes’ G-Class (Gelandewagen) paid no homage to Jeep’s iconic CJ/Wrangler (plus Land Rover’s Series 1/11/111/Defender and Toyota’s Land Cruiser J40/70) when it arrived in 1979 isn’t being fully honest, and with respect to this new Compass, it’s not only premium in styling, but does a decent job of mimicking a compact luxury utility inside as well. 

You’ll want to move up from my tester’s just-above-base North trim to a Trailhawk, Limited or High Altitude model in order to get some of the more luxurious finishings, but this second-rung example has a nicely finished cabin nonetheless. Its dash top and most of the instrument panel is soft to the touch, wrapping all the way around the infotainment touchscreen before spanning the front door uppers. The door inserts get a nice supple padded leatherette treatment too, similar to the armrests that also boast attractive cream and copper dual-tone contrast stitching to match the same on the leather-wrapped steering wheel, shifter boot, and seat upholstery. 

Those seats include stylish hexagonal-pattern black fabric inserts and leatherette bolsters, plus are quite comfortable due to a good inherent design and four-way power lumbar support. Yes, you heard me right, this hardly loaded compact Jeep gets an eight-way powered driver’s seat with four-way lumbar, this latter feature not always included with some premium brands’ offerings. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
…. as it is through rougher situations. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The little Jeep also gets high-quality switchgear, with the standard two-zone automatic climate control system’s main dials trimmed in chrome with rubber grips, while my Compass tester included a separate HVAC interface within its upgraded 8.4-inch touchscreen that allowed me to swipe up and down for temperature settings, not to mention adjust the two-way front seat heaters and super-hot heated steering wheel rim. 

The centre touchscreen provides many more functions, including plenty of entertainment choices from the usual AM/FM radio bands to HD as well as satellite radio, not to mention Bluetooth streaming audio, while the optional navigation system provided accurate route guidance and nicely detailed mapping, the standard Android Auto smartphone integration hooked up to my Samsung S9 easily (Apple CarPlay is standard too), a nice big reverse camera with active guidelines made parking a breeze, etcetera. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
Its details look nice when cleaned up too. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Yet more $29,645 Compass North trim features include 17-inch aluminum wheels wrapped in 225/60 all-season tires, automatic headlamps, fog lamps with cornering capability, body-coloured side mirrors and door handles, bright daylight opening mouldings, black roof rails, deep-tint sunscreen glass, proximity keyless entry, LED ambient interior lighting, and illuminated vanity mirrors, while features pulled up from the $26,150 base Sport model just below include an electric parking brake, pushbutton start/stop, heated and powered side mirrors, powered windows, tilt and telescopic steering, cruise control, a six-speaker audio system, an aux input and USB connectivity/charging port, a second-row USB charger, a 115-volt household-style power outlet, two 12-volt chargers, a forward folding front passenger seat, a capless fuel filler, hill start assist, tire pressure monitoring, a block heater, and the list goes on. 

The previously noted eight-way powered driver’s seat is optional, as are the heated front seats and steering wheel rim, and the 1.4-inch larger 8.4-inch infotainment touchscreen with navigation, while my test model also boasted a really impressive, fully featured, high-resolution 7.0-inch digital gauge cluster between the otherwise analogue dials, a windshield wiper de-icer, rain-sensing wipers, an auto-dimming centre mirror, rear parking sonar, blindspot monitoring with rear cross-traffic warning, remote start, heavy-duty all-weather floor mats, a full-size spare tire, a Class III tow package, and more. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
The Compass cabin is quite upscale for a subcompact utility. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The standard quad-halogen headlamps can be upgraded to bi-xenon HIDs with LED signatures, while LED taillights can also be added, as can a set of 18-inch alloys on 225/55 all-season tires, an upgraded audio system with Alpine speakers, a two-pane panoramic sunroof, plus a powered liftgate, while the Compass’ convenience and safety can be enhanced by opting for adaptive cruise control with stop and go, automatic high-beam headlamp control, forward collision warning with active braking, advanced brake assist, and lane departure warning with lane keeping assist, and this is merely North trim. 

You can also get the Compass in $30,940 Altitude trim, which ups the ante with glossed black 18-inch alloy wheels, yet more glossy black exterior trim including a black-painted roof, plus auto on/off headlights, nicer upholstery, a set of dual exhaust tips, and additional changes, while the $31,640 Upland model includes the 17-inch off-road alloy wheels found on the aforementioned Trailhawk model, as well as its unique front fascia, front skid plate, tow hooks, and other styling upgrades. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
A big 7-inch multi-info display puts key functions just where you need them. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The full $34,145 Trailhawk model includes an off-road package with a unique raised uprated suspension setup, plus off-road tires encircling the just-mentioned 17-inch alloys, underbody skid plates, hill descent control, the previously noted 7.0-inch digital gauge cluster display and 8.4-inch centre touchscreen as standard, rain-sensing wipers, ambient-lighted cupholders, and leather upholstery. 

Limited trim, which starts at $36,145, builds on the more car-like Altitude trim, adding the aforementioned remote start system, the windshield wiper de-icer, heated front seats, and heated steering wheel as standard equipment, plus it includes a 12-way power driver’s seat, whereas the top-line $38,340 High Altitude model features the HID headlights, LED taillights and navigation system as standard equipment, while also adding 19-inch wheels and tires, plus perforated leather upholstery (learn more about 2020 Jeep Compass pricing, including trims, packages and options, plus make sure to research available rebates and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands, right here on CarCostCanada).

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x42020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
This 8.4-inch touchscreen is optional, yet well worth the upgrade. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

No matter which trim line you choose, the 2020 Compass is quite spacious for its subcompact crossover SUV designation. It provides lots of room in the front, plus plenty of driver’s seat adjustability, with good reach from the telescopic steering column, providing me with an ideal driving position, while there’s more headroom than most anyone should ever require. 

Once I’d set my driver’s seat up for my long-legged, short-torso body type, a process that forced me to slide it further back than most people measuring my five-foot-eight height would normally need to, I nevertheless had approximately six inches in front of my knees when seated directly behind in the second row. I also had about four inches above my head, plus another four next to my hips and shoulders, while the Compass includes a comfortably wide folding armrest in the middle. The window seats are comfortable with decent lower back support, and the aforementioned rear seat amenities, which also included good air circulation through vents on the backside of the front console, aided rear seat relaxation. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
An optional 8-way powered driver’s seat includes 4-way power lumbar. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The luggage compartment features the usual carpeting on the floor and seatbacks, plus four chrome tie-down rings, and the usual 60/40 split-folding rear seats that grow cargo capacity from 770 litres (27.2 cubic feet) to 1,693 litres (39.8 cu ft). This is up 127 litres (4.5 cu ft) from the old version of this SUV when the seats are left in place, yet it’s 82 litres (2.9 cu ft) less accommodating when they’re laid flat. 

Repositioning myself in the driver’s seat, I saw no Eco or Sport driving modes to eke out better mileage or drive the most performance from the Compass’ standard 2.4-litre Tigershark MultiAir four-cylinder engine, or for that matter its three drivetrains. The engine makes 180 horsepower and 175 lb-ft of torque, potent for its subcompact SUV segment, while fuel consumption depends on whether it’s mated up to the base front-wheel drive, six-speed manual combination (10.4 L/100km city, 7.3 highway and 9.0 combined), front-wheel drive with the six-speed auto (10.6 city, 7.6 highway and 9.3 combined), which also features auto stop/start that automatically shuts the engine off when it would otherwise be idling, or four-wheel drive with its nine-speed auto (10.8 city, 7.8 highway and 9.5 combined) that also boasts idle stop/start. Only Sport trim offers the manual, with the Sport, North and Altitude models allowing for the option of front-wheel drive with the six-speed automatic, while all trims can be had with the 4WD, nine-speed configuration, which is standard on Upland models and above. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
The spacious rear seating area is plenty comfortable too. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The Compass is wonderfully fun to drive, especially when equipped with my tester’s steering wheel paddle-actuated nine-speed automatic. It’s plenty quick off the line, the little turbocharged four providing loads of torque for a good kick in the pants at launch and no slowing as speed ramps up. Fast-paced cornering is good too, while the little Compass provides a nice compliant ride even over imperfect pavement. It boasts a fully independent suspension with rear struts instead of a multi-link setup (or trailing arm), so as to allow for more travel while 4x4ing. 

And it’s true, the little Compass is a reasonably good off-roader. Jeep’s Selec-Terrain drive mode system comes standard, providing Auto, Snow, Sand and Mud settings, the latter proving to be quite capable when put through its paces in a dirty, muddy, watery off-road playground near my home. I would’ve rather had a Trailhawk for such activities, its slight suspension lift and more suitable tires no doubt aiding grip while traversing more challenging obstacles, but nevertheless the Compass North crawled over some fairly difficult medium-duty trails including ankle-deep wading through a number of sizeable mud puddles, allowing me to bring it back home in one piece. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
Fold the 60/40-split second row down and you’ve got loads of cargo space. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The only problem I experienced during my weeklong test had to do with its highly advanced optional nine-speed automatic gearbox, which while very smooth and quite refined in its taller ratios, plus enjoyable thanks to its sporty rev-matching capability, was sometimes far from smooth when starting out. When pressing the throttle it hesitated slightly, resulting in an uncomfortable slap in the back that was followed by a mechanical clunk when taking off. 

Even worse, the Compass was my first and only test vehicle to stall when restarting from its idle stop/start mode. I was waiting at a stoplight with the engine automatically shut down, when the light turned green and, upon taking my foot off the brake nothing happened. I immediately dabbed the gas pedal to get things going, yet the engine only attempted a start before petering out while in Drive. After looking at the controls in dumbfounded dismay, I returned my foot to the brake, shifted back into Park, pushed the start button, once again shifted into Drive, and then waited too long (as if the transmission was slipping) for it to clunk into first gear before moving again. I wasn’t happy. In fact, a line of thankfully patient drivers was behind me, no doubt all wondering how this pathetic person purchased their driver’s license. 

2020 Jeep Compass North 4x4
The new Compass provides great day-to-day performance with a go-anywhere attitude. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

After some digging online, I learned that Jeep’s ZF-sourced nine-speed automatic has been causing myriad problems for the brand in this Compass and other models, particularly the Cherokee, going back years, and the near exact story I just told you was reiterated by a number of frustrated Compass customers on the U.S. NHTSA website, even as recently as August 2019. 

The sad thing is I truly like this SUV, so therefore I don’t want to end the story with such a dire problem. After all, it’s a great looking little unit, offers up an attractive, well-made interior that’s stock full of upscale features, is priced quite well, is wonderfully practical, and thoroughly enjoyable to drive (when the transmission works properly). I can easily recommend its manual and six-speed automatic front-wheel drive trims, but until I’ve spent some time in a couple of trouble-free testers I hesitate as much as this test car’s nine-speed automatic when recommending one of its pricier models. 

Story and photo credits: Trevor Hofmann

The new Porsche Taycan is finally here and its top-line 750-hp Turbo S is awesome

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The 2020 Taycan Turbo S redefines electrified performance. (Photo: Porsche)

Not many cars have been as enthusiastically anticipated as the new Porsche Taycan, and now production model has finally arrived at the 2019 IAA in Frankfurt, Germany. 

To say that it’s powerful seems as bizarrely understated as merely calling it quick. Take a deep breath and then consider that its most formidable variant makes an outrageous 750 horsepower and even more mind-blowing 774 lb-ft of torque, its collective force allowing for a 2.8-second blast from zero to 100 km/h. 

Such performance is nothing new to Tesla aficionados, the California brand’s Model S P100D good for a 0 to 100 km/h run of only 2.6 seconds, but how it achieves that feat with just 613 horsepower and 686 lb-ft of torque available is beyond me (although the fact that its heaviest curb weight of 2,250 kg/4,960 lbs is lower than the Taycan’s 2,295-kg/5,059-lb unladen weight probably has something to do with it). Then again, Porsche has a tendency to understate performance specifications; this brewing up to be an epic drag race that every credible cable and YouTube automotive show will be covering. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The Taycan sports a stunning new design that will influence future Porsche models for years to come. (Photo: Porsche)

This said, Porsche’s faithful care more going fast around corners than merely burning up the asphalt in a straight line. To prove the Taycan’s dominance through tight twisting curves, Porsche took a pre-series example to the legendary Nürburgring-Nordschleife racetrack and quickly set an EV lap-record of 7:42 minutes, which just so happened to obliterate the last Tesla Model S P85D’s 8:50 lap time by over a minute. A minute off the pace around any racetrack is downright embarrassing, making us willing to bet that Tesla will soon show up in Nürburg, Rhineland-Palatinate with its more recently introduced P100D, plus a complete crew and an experienced driver. 

In Tesla’s corner is price, because any 2020 Taycan Turbo is much more expensive than even a fully featured Model S P100D. The 2020 Taycan Turbo, which makes 671 maximum horsepower in launch mode, 627 lb-ft of torque, and can achieve a 3.2-second run from zero to 100 km/h, is now ready to order for $173,900 plus freight, whereas the new top-tier Taycan Turbo S is available from $213,900. Making matters more interesting, these two models aren’t even fully loaded, with Porsche’s many pricey options capable of driving its price up and over $250,000, which is a range normally associated with Aston Martin Rapides, Bentley Flying Spurs and Rolls-Royce Ghosts (ok, maybe a used R-R). 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
While straight-line acceleration is important in this class, the Taycan’s forte is high-speed control around corners. (Photo: Porsche)

None of the super sedans above are capable of completing the 100-yard dash as quickly or scaling a mountain pass with the level of fleet finesse as a Taycan, however, while none will get the job done without chugging down a tanker’s full of premium unleaded gasoline. Back to electrics, a new 2019 Model S can be had for a comparatively bargain basement $108,990, while its sportier Performance trim line will set you back a mere $134,990 before creeping up to $155k when all options are added. Still, that seems like chump change next to a Taycan Turbo or Turbo S. 

If you’re starting to feel like Porsche has forgotten simpler folk that can barely afford anything into six figures, we can take a little comfort in knowing that these super-fast Turbo variants (in name only, as there are no turbos at play) are merely being introduced first for their jaw-dropping wow factor. Later this year additional less powerful trims will be added to bring the price down from their current cirrus-pheric levels to mere stratospheric realms, but the upcoming Cross Turismo crossover coupe, which will directly take on Jaguar’s I-Pace toward the end of 2020, will no doubt have a full range of more and less accessible window stickers. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The new Taycan’s interior looks very inviting. (Photo: Porsche)

While performance matters, styling will probably play a bigger role in consumer choices when opting for either the Taycan or Model S. The new Porsche is completely new and inarguably good looking, whereas the Model S has been in production for seven years with very few changes. Fit, finish and interior refinement isn’t exactly a Model S strong point either, but expect only the industry’s best materials and workmanship within the new Porsche, while Stuttgart’s various on-board electronic systems are as good as digital displays get. 

To that end the Taycan includes a fully digital pod-like gauge cluster that appears to float on its own behind the steering wheel. The black background of its classic Porsche curved oval area gets filled with colourful high-definition graphics that should appeal to both experienced EV users as well as long-time Porsche owners, while the two touchscreens that span the centre and right-side of the dash, the second display in front of the passenger, and the third capacitive touchscreen atop the sloped centre console (a la Range Rover), are digital eye candy and ideal for optimal control of the car’s myriad functions. 

One of those screens no doubt includes animated power-flow graphics that show a permanent-magnet synchronous motor powering each axle, combining for the previously noted output numbers depending on the model chosen, although it should be noted that both make 616 horsepower when not in launch mode. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The fully digital gauge cluster takes its overall oval shape from classic Porsche models. (Photo: Porsche)

With that overboost setting switched back on, the slower of the two Taycan models can launch from standstill to 200 km/h in a scant 10.6 seconds, while this car’s standing quarter mile arrives in just 11.1 seconds. Do the same with the more formidable Turbo S and the 200-km/h mark arrives in just 9.8 seconds, while the quarter mile zips past in only 10.8. Both trims top out at 280 km/h (161 mph), an electronically limited top speed. 

To achieve such performance the new Porsche incorporates some ultra-sophisticated tech, such as a single-speed front transmission and a larger two-speed rear gearbox. The latter transmission incorporates one gear for acceleration and another taller one for higher speed cruising. It chooses between rear gear sets automatically by monitoring a driver’s style, but it can also be done manually by selecting one of five drive modes. Just like it sounds, Range mode optimizes efficiency and therefore employs the taller second gear as often as possible while temporarily shutting down the front motor, whereas Normal mode makes the second gear the priority, yet uses the first gear a bit more. Sport mode, on the other hand, prioritizes first gear up to about 90 to 100 km/h, although it shifts to the second gear whenever throttle pressure is eased, and then goes back to first when needed. The Taycan also includes Sport Plus and Individual driving modes. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
Taycan infotainment is divided between three touchscreens, two across the top and one on the lower console. (Photo: Porsche)

Anyone who’s owned a Tesla knows about overheating, the Model S notorious for it, especially when trying to execute consecutive full-power standing starts. Rather than grandfather this problem onto new Taycan buyers, Porsche has designed cooler running electric motors that feature a special hairpin winding technique to the stators’ copper solenoid coils. The result is a copper fill factor of 70 percent compared to 45 percent when those coils are wound the traditional way, giving the Taycan better more reliable performance. 

In order to prove its point, Porsche endurance-tested the new Taycan in ultra-hot climates (of 42°C with a track temperature of nearly 54°C). A pre-production model circled Italy’s high-banked Nardò Ring oval racetrack at speeds ranging between 195 and 215 km/h for 24 hours straight, the marathon including six test drivers covering 3,425 km (2,128 m). Following up this punishing test program was another test that saw the new Porsche undergo 26 back-to-back launches from standstill to 200 km/h of less than 10 seconds each, with an average of 0.8 seconds variance between fastest and slowest acceleration times. Then we have the Nürburgring event noted earlier, with performance that should completely set the Taycan apart from the Model S. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
The four-place interior appears plenty practical. (Photo: Porsche)

Below the floorboards of both Taycan Turbo models is a 93.4-kilowatt-hour high-voltage lithium-ion battery sourced from LG, with enough stored energy to drive for 381 to 450 km (237 to 280 miles) based on the European WLTP rating system. The more quicker Turbo S also offers more range, its expected distance from fully topped up to near empty being 388 to 412 km (241 to 256 miles). 

Making all this happen is an industry-first 800-volt electrical architecture, this also providing for faster recharging when an appropriate 270-kW charge station can be found (or installed in your home). How fast can it be refilled? How does five to 80 percent in just 22.5 minutes sound? Sure that’s a long wait for those used to filling up at a gas station, but anyone familiar with an electric car will know this is incredibly quick. 

Porsche’s Charging Planner makes the process of charging even easier, or at least can maximize one’s efficiency when traveling. For instance, when it charts a given route it factors in the best places to recharge along the way, even if it driving a bit farther out of the way for a quicker 270-kW charge station (which will save a lot of time over a regular 50-kW DC charger) is needed. What’s more, the Charging Planner will precondition the battery to 20°C for faster recharging. 

2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo S
Its 800-volt architecture means a 270-kW charger can fill its battery from 5 to 80 percent in just 22.5 minutes. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the new 2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo and Turbo S are now available to build and order from Porsche Canada’s retail website, or you can place an order through your neighbourhood Porsche dealer, but you’ll want to act quickly if being amongst the first in your city to own one matters. This is the first electric car ever capable of truly taking on Tesla’s quickest Model S, making it about as important as any EV built within the last seven years. 

And while waiting to take delivery of your new Taycan, or simply hoping for those lottery ticket numbers to match the bouncing balls on TV, enjoy the complete album of gallery photos above and generous supply of Porsche-sourced videos below: 

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

World Premiere Porsche Taycan (40:33):

 

The new Porsche Taycan – Designed to enliven (1:28):

 

The fully electric Porsche Taycan accelerates 0-90-0 mph on the USS Hornet (0:59):

 

Onboard Lap – Porsche Taycan Sets a Record at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife (8:09):

 

New Porsche Taycan sets a record at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife (0:58):

 

Taycan Prototype Convinces at Endurance Run in Nardò (0:57):

 

The new electric Porsche Taycan proves its repeatability of power before upcoming World Premiere (1:05):

 

A thank you to electricity: The Porsche Taycan (0:45):

 

Porsche adds 670 hp plug-in hybrid drivetrain to 2020 Cayenne and Cayenne Coupe

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The new 670-hp Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid can sprint from 0-100km/h in just 3.6 seconds. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche introduced its completely redesigned third-generation Cayenne for model year 2018, and as is normally the case for the Stuttgart, Germany-headquartered luxury brand, has been continually expanding the mid-size crossover SUV line with new trim levels ever since. 

From the modest yet still energetic 335 horsepower base V6 up to the rip-roaring 541 horsepower Turbo, with the 434 horsepower Cayenne S and 455 net horsepower Cayenne E-Hybrid plug-in in between, the Cayenne portfolio is wide and diverse, but now, taking its cue from last year’s Panamera, Porsche is about to add a much more formidable 670 net horsepower (541 hp from the Internal Combustion Engine/ICE and 134 hp from the electric motor) Turbo S E-Hybrid model to its mid-size SUV lineup. 

The premium brand’s performance-tuned eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic gearbox comes as standard equipment, as does the Porsche Traction Management (PTM) active all-wheel drive system with an electronically variable, map-controlled multi-plate clutch, plus an automatic brake differential (ABD) and anti-slip regulation (ASR). 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
Both the conventional Cayenne and the new Cayenne Coupe can be had in Turbo S E-Hybrid trim. (Photo: Porsche)

The new plug-in hybrid powertrain will be the top-level trim on the regular Cayenne as well as the new Cayenne Coupe, the latter (in lesser trims) expected to arrive at Porsche Canada dealerships soon, and along with heaps of electrified and twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 horsepower it makes a shocking 663 lb-ft of combined torque (567 lb-ft from the ICE and 295 lb-ft from the electric motor), making the new model capable of blasting from zero to 100 km/h in just 3.8 seconds with its standard Sport Chrono Package, or 3.6 seconds with its available Lightweight Sport Package, all ahead of achieving a terminal velocity of 295 km/h (183.3 mph). 

Being that it’s a plug-in hybrid (PHEV), the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid’s completely charged 14.1 kWh battery is reportedly good for zero-local-emissions commutes and errand runs over short durations thanks to a maximum EV range of about 40 kilometres. The lithium-ion battery, which hides below the cargo compartment floor, takes a mere 6 hours to fully recharge when connected to a 230-volt Level 2 household charging station, but Porsche claims that a 400-volt supercharger is capable of reducing charge times to only 2.4 hours. 

Additionally, owners can download a smartphone app that can remotely monitor the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid’s charging process, plus the same app can pre-condition the auto climate control system and other features before the owner returns, similarly to how a remote engine start system can do likewise, but the Cayenne PHEV app only utilizes the battery for ancillary power, rather than the gasoline-portion of the SUV’s powertrain. 

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid needs just 2.4 hours to completely recharge on a 400-volt supercharger. (Photo: Porsche)

Those not yet familiar with Porsche’s all-new Cayenne Coupe should know that it gets a 20-millimetre roofline drop featuring a reworked front windshield framed within a shallower set of A pillars, plus much more tapered rear side windows, completely remoulded rear side doors, redesigned rear quarter panels, and a new rear bumper, with the latter composite panel also getting a new integrated license plate holder. This results in a small 19-mm (0.7-inch) increase to overall width, which when combined together with its just-noted lower ride height makes for an even more aggressive stance than the regular Cayenne. 

A few more Cayenne Coupe improvements include a special adaptive rear spoiler, individual rear bucket-style sport seats divided by a shallow centre console storage bin, and a standard 2.16-cubic-metre fixed glass panoramic moonroof that can be cloaked from sunlight by an integrated roller-type shade, or optionally the roof panel can be made from lightweight carbon-fibre. 

The all-new 2020 Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid, which is available to order now with deliveries expected early next year, will set you back another $40,400 over the already pricey 2019 Cayenne Turbo, at $182,200 plus freight and fees, this more than twice the price of a base 2019 Cayenne that’s available from only $76,700. As for the new Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe, its $187,100 retail price is $39,100 loftier than the 2019 Cayenne Turbo Coupe, and likewise is more than double that of the $86,400 base Cayenne Coupe. Interestingly, both Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid and Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe perform identically.  

2020 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
The new Cayenne’s interior is beautifully crafted from some of the industry’s best materials. (Photo: Porsche)

Incidentally, you can find detailed 2020 Porsche Cayenne pricing right here on CarCostCanada, including its various trims, packages and individual options, plus you can also save big by learning about available rebates and even source dealer invoice pricing that could keep thousands more in your wallet. 

If you want to get your hands on either new Porsche model, make sure to contact your local dealer as quickly as possible, and while you’re waiting make sure to enjoy the sole video the German automaker provided below. 

 

The new Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupé: A master of balance (1:00):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Porsche

Porsche grows 2020 911 line with new base Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Most will agree, the new 2020 911 Carrera Cabriolet looks fabulous. (Photo: Porsche)

It’s been less than a year since Porsche introduced the all-new eighth-generation 2020 911 at the LA auto show, and just seven months since the Cabriolet arrived, and now the German performance brand is readying those mid-range Carrera S models for production and upcoming deliveries this fall. Ahead of these 443 horsepower super cars, Porsche has just released photos and key information about a couple of 911 models that are a bit more down to earth, the more affordable base 911 Carrera Coupe and 911 Carrera Cabriolet. 

The new entry-level 911 hardtop and soft-top models share the same 3.0-litre twin-turbo six-cylinder “boxer” engine as those “S” trims, but they incorporate a unique set of turbos for less performance. Still, 379 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque is no laughing matter, unless the thrill of quick acceleration makes you giggle. The first number adds 9 horsepower over the outgoing 2019 model, which results in a zero to 100km/h sprint time of just 4.2 seconds, or 4.0 seconds with the optional Sport Chrono Package. This is a significant move up from the outgoing base Carrera that was only capable of 4.6 or 4.2 seconds to 100km/h respectively. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
A base model? Yes, it’s hard to believe this gorgeous new 2020 Carrera Coupe is the most affordable 911. (Photo: Porsche)

Surprisingly, the new 911 Carrera will only be available with Porsche’s new eight-speed dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission when it first arrives. This gearbox, which was originally announced for the Carrera S, adds one gear over the outgoing automatic, for stronger performance and improved fuel economy. Those who want the seven-speed manual will need to wait until later in the model. 

The new Carrera Coupe’s track speed is identical to the outgoing model at 293 km/h (182 mph), while the Cabriolet’s terminal velocity is 291 km/h (181 mph). It’s normal for a fabric-topped convertible to be slower at high speeds than its equivalent hardtop coupe, due to the cloth roof “ballooning” at high speeds, but Porsche incorporated magnesium surface elements dubbed “bows” within the redesigned roof’s structure, so it manages wind more effectively. 

By the way, that fabric roof, which is now bigger to accommodate for the 911’s larger interior, can open and close at speeds of up to 50 km/h (30 mph), and only needs 12 seconds to do so thanks to a reworked hydraulic system. What’s more, the updated process also extends an electrically extendable wind deflector so as to keep gusts of air from discomforting occupants. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Porsche promises a larger, more accommodating interior with greater refinement and more advanced technologies. (Photo: Porsche)

Inside that larger, more accommodating cabin, the new 911 Carrera receives a wholly renewed interior with a large 10.9-inch high-definition touchscreen on the centre stack, while an all-new safety feature dubbed “Wet Mode” provides greater control when it’s raining or otherwise slippery. 

All just-mentioned items come standard with the Carrera S, but take note the new base Carrera gets a smaller set of 19-inch alloys on 235/40 ZR performance tires up front, plus bigger 20-inch rims shod in 295/35 ZR rubber at the rear. Additionally, the base Carrera’s 330-millimetre brake rotors are smaller than the Carrera S’ discs, these biting onto black-coated four-piston monobloc fixed calipers for stopping power that should easily be up to task for dealing with this less potent car’s overall performance. Also notable, the 911 Carrera’s exhaust system gets unique individual tailpipe covers. 

Transport Canada hasn’t provided fuel economy specs for the new 2020 911 models yet, but Porsche claims its new base Coupe and Cabriolet will be capable of a 9.0 and 9.2 L/100km city/highway combined rating respectively, when calculated on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). We can expect slightly different numbers when our five-cycle rating system is applied. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Porsche’s new eight-speed automatic will be standard until its seven-speed manual arrives later in the model year. (Photo: Porsche)

And what about pricing? Surprisingly the base 2020 911 Carrera Coupe’s window sticker gets pushed up $7,000 over its predecessor, from $104,000 to $111,000, while the Cabriolet’s starting price has been increased from $118,100 to $125,600, for a $7,500 increase. Then again, we need to factor in that the new eight-speed automated PDK transmission is now standard, and that prices will likely be lowered when the seven-speed manual arrives later in the model year. 

Just the same, Porsche is probably hoping that the new 2020 911 Carrera’s many enhancements will justify its sharp move up in price, but this said it will be interesting to witness how a more value-driven rival, like Chevy’s new 526-horsepower mid-engine C8 Corvette that hits the road for a mere $69,998, might erode 911 sales. Granted, Porsche clientele, particularly 911 buyers, are not normally Corvette buyers, but the C8 is no normal Corvette, and its more exotic mid-engine layout and styling, stronger performance, and bargain basement price might lure in those who aren’t as brand loyal. 

This said, if you still want a 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe or Cabriolet you can order it now and expect delivery early next year, while all-wheel drive C4 models will be available to order soon. 

And while waiting, be sure to flick through all the photos we’ve gathered in our gallery above, plus enjoy the short video below: 

The new 911 Carrera Coupé and 911 Carrera Cabriolet. (1:00):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann 

Photo credits: Porsche