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Nissan gives its best-selling Rogue a ground-up redesign for 2021

2021 Nissan Rogue
Nissan has given its redesigned Rogue a more rugged new look for 2021, and we like what we see.

The Rogue is without doubt Nissan’s most important vehicle, selling in greater numbers than any other in its lineup.

Last year the Japanese brand’s compact SUV found 37,530 Canadian buyers, compared to 18,526 for the subcompact Qashqai crossover, 16,086 for the even smaller city car-sized subcompact Kicks crossover, 12,000 for the mid-size Murano crossover, 7,719 for the compact Sentra sedan, 6,361 for the now discontinued Micra city car, 5,704 for the mid-size three-row Pathfinder SUV, 3,723 for the mid-size Frontier pickup truck, 3,342 for the mid-size Altima sedan, 2,881 for the compact Leaf EV, 2,807 for the full-size Titan pickup truck (both half-ton and 3/4-ton versions), 2,369 for the now defunct subcompact Versa Note hatchback, 1,783 for the NV200 compact commercial van, 971 for the full-size Maxima flagship sedan, 807 for the NV full-size commercial van (both cargo and passenger versions), 593 for the full-size (and real flagship) Armada SUV, 500 for the iconic 370Z sports car, and finally 53 for the nearly unbeatable GT-R super-coupe.

2021 Nissan Rogue
The new Rogue isn’t as boxy as Toyota’s RAV4, but it’s certainly more masculine looking than its predecessor.

Interestingly, the only Nissan model to lead its segment in deliveries was the Micra (RIP), with some displaying woefully poor performance on the sales charts compared to their competitors, the Sentra, Altima, Pathfinder, Frontier, Titan and full-size NV van particularly, while doing well yet not at the very top of their respective categories are the Leaf, Kicks, Qashqai and, yes, you guessed it, the Rogue.

Nissan desperately needs a hit, and while the Rogue won’t likely race past the RAV4’s comparatively (to everything else) interstellar numbers last year, selling 65,248 units to Honda’s 55,859 CR-Vs, it could rise to third by overtaking the Ford Escape’s 39,504 deliveries once calendar year 2021 is in the rearview mirror. Of course, 2020 will either be a negative blip on the sales chart radar or the beginning of a downturn, but either way there will be winners and losers throughout this year and in the years that follow, and all the changes made to the new 2021 Rogue appear to be putting it on the right side of the balance sheet.

2021 Nissan Rogue
A bolder, squarer V-motion grille is the Rogue’s standout feature.

Like it or not, rugged, blocky styling is in for modern SUVs, and soft, smooth curves are out. All we need to do is look at the aforementioned RAV4 to appreciate how true this appears to be. Fortunately for Nissan, the 2021 Rogue is gone all brazen, with a tougher look that should be very appealing in its small SUV segment.

We shouldn’t go so far as to call it aggressive, but the new Rogue definitely comes across as more assertive than the outgoing model. It gets a bolder version of Nissan’s squared off V-motion grille at the front and new black D pillars at the rear, the latter coming close to the “floating roof” concept initiated by the previously noted Maxima and Murano. This looks even better when opting for new two-tone exterior colour combinations that allow for a fully black roof. Tough looking lower body cladding muscles up its look further, enhanced by new “U-shape” bodyside panels, while the sharp looking LED tail lamps don’t deviate quite as much from those on the old model as the entirely new multi-level LED head lamps.

2021 Nissan Rogue
Partially blackened rear pillars form a floating roof effect when the optional black roof is added.

In an automotive world that almost always grows outwardly it’s refreshing to learn that this new Rogue actually arrives shorter by 1.5 inches than its predecessor, while it also slices 0.2 inches from road to rooftop. This won’t likely be noticeable inside, but the subtle dimensional shrinkage contributes to the updated SUV’s more upright look without causing it appear too chunky.

While Nissan hasn’t announced a specific off-road trim for its new 2021 Rogue, the RAV4 being the only small SUV to do so with its near-4×4-capable 2019-2020 Trail version and the even more robust TRD Off Road Package now available for the 2020 model year, it’s unfair to claim the new Rogue’s rugged image is only surface deep.

2021 Nissan Rogue
Nice detailing within the LED taillights looks sharp.

With trims featuring the brand’s Intelligent All-Wheel Drive, a centre console-mounted Drive Mode Selector boasts an “Off-road” setting for overcoming more challenging terrain. Don’t expect it to keep up with the old Xterra or current Armada, but be confident it will be able to make its way over protruding rocks and other moderately sized obstacles emanating from the gravel on the way to the family cabin. Nissan also provides a “Snow” mode that does similarly for slippery road/trail surfaces, while the Drive Mode Selector also features Standard, Eco and Sport settings for normal conditions, these last three being the only settings offered with front-wheel drive models.

Benefiting traction yet more, new Rogue AWD models feature a Vehicle Motion Control System that Senior Vice President of Research and Development at the Nissan Technical Centre North America Chris Reed claims will do “what a human can’t.”

“The all-new Vehicle Motion Control predicts what the driver is trying to do by monitoring steering, acceleration and braking,” says Reed. “It can then step in and help to smooth things out.”

2021 Nissan Rogue
The new Rogue provides a more upscale experience than its predecessor.

In a nutshell, Vehicle Motion Control (VMC) combines with the new Rogue’s all-wheel drive system and its Drive Mode Selector to provide four-wheel control individually, enhancing line traceability so as to smooth out curves via the braking system’s ABS. It can even apply a single brake pad in order to do so. VMC, that incorporates a chassis control module that continuously “monitors and adjusts engine, transmission, Vehicle Dynamic Control, all-wheel drive and steering functions,” is particularly useful when “driving on snowy slopes, deep snow, snow flat turning and off-road driving (such as beach or dirt trails),” confirmed a press release.

The Rogue’s Intelligent All-Wheel Drive system now features an electro-hydraulic controlled clutch that disseminates torque more quickly and more precisely due to its ability to predict front-wheel slippage. This improves rear torque distribution as well as greater traction and responsiveness.

2021 Nissan Rogue
A fully digital 12.3-inch gauge cluster is available.

Responsiveness in mind, a new faster-ratio rack electric power steering design is said to speed up turn-in, while a rigid six-position front suspension mounting and reworked multi-link rear suspension should go further to benefit handling.

Better road-holding matters because the new 2021 Rogue receives 11 additional horsepower and 6 more lb-ft of torque via a revised direct-injection 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine. This results in 181 horsepower and 181 lb-ft of torque, with much of the gains coming from a mirror bore coating technique that reduces friction for better efficiency, as well as a new variable displacement oil pump, plus an integrated exhaust manifold, and finally an e-VTC intake valve.

2021 Nissan Rogue
This is the top-line 9.0-inch infotainment display atop the new tri-zone auto HVAC interface.

Nissan has long been a technology leader under the hood and within the chassis, not to mention in advanced driver assistive systems (ADAS), the new model carrying forward with its innovative Rear Door Alert system that warns the driver when something or someone may have been left in the rear seating area, while also adding new Intelligent Driver Alertness to monitor steering patterns and recommend a break when detecting drowsiness, plus Easy Fill Tire Alert to maintain ideal tire pressure.

Continuing on the ADAS theme, Nissan’s Safety Shield 360 is a suite of essential systems featuring Intelligent Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection, Blind Spot Warning, Lane Departure Warning, Rear Cross Traffic Alert, and High Beam Assist, while Rear Intelligent Emergency Braking is now standard too, this technology automatically stopping the Rogue before backing into an obstacle or worse, into a child or traffic.

2021 Nissan Rogue
Of course, wireless device charging is available.

Traffic Sign Recognition, Blind Spot Intervention and Intelligent Cruise Control with improved stop-and-go are available with the new Rogue as well, the latter feature coming as part as an upgraded ProPilot Assist hands-on-wheel partial self-driving system. The new Rogue’s safety kit is improved further with 10 standard airbags instead of just six, plus extended crumple zones to protect occupants during impact. Yet more extras include new four-door Intelligent Key that lets driver and passengers open all four doors, this being part of the updated SUV’s “Family Hub” group of features that also adds tri-zone auto climate control.

Now that we’re inside focused on the centre stack, the standard 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen display (already sizeable for the segment) is optionally 1.0-inch larger, while Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard no matter which trim is chosen, with Google Maps and Waze featuring voice recognition also available.

2021 Nissan Rogue
The stubby little electronic shifter allows for storage space below.

Even more advanced, the new Rogue sports a customizable 12.3-inch “Digital Dashboard” instrument cluster ahead of the driver, which totally replaces the more conventional instruments with a crisp, colourful high-definition TFT display, although take note that the base model still incorporates a 7.0-inch multi-information display between its dials, which not only is 2.0 inch bigger than the outgoing model’s base cluster, but is fully customizable too. What’s more, a massive 10.8-inch head-up display can be projected onto the windshield so all critical info is as easy as possible to see without taking one’s eyes from the road.

All of this impressive gear is housed in an interior that looks much nicer than its predecessor and most rivals, with plenty of premium-level pliable surfaces as well as nicer available Prima-Tex leatherette and quilted semi-aniline leather upholsteries, in no-cost optional Graphite, Grey or Tan. Better wood grains and metallic trims add to the upscale ambiance, while supporting driver and front passenger is a set of NASA-inspired Zero Gravity seats that feature standard front heaters.

2021 Nissan Rogue
NASA-inspired Zero Gravity seats are designed to be amongst the most comfortable in the compact SUV class.

The steering wheel is also heated in base trim, while rear outboard seat warmers are available, as is two-position driver-side memory. A surround parking camera system dubbed Intelligent Around View Monitor is also available, this useful feature combined with the previously noted rear driver assistance systems.

Also notable, Nissan’s adoption of a fully electronic transmission allows for a smaller, shorter and generally smarter electronic shift lever, while thanks to this there is plenty of space for stowing personal items below the “floating” centre console.

2021 Nissan Rogue
No shortage of premium-level options in the new Rogue.

Storage in mind, Nissan still hasn’t given the Rogue a rear centre pass-through or 40/20/40 split-folding rear seats despite some competitors anteing up with this much more convenient option. This allows users to stow longer items, such as skis, down the centre while rear passengers benefit from the more comfortable, optionally heatable rear window positions, but this said Nissan has provided one-touch automated folding with “an available remote fold feature” for added convenience. The Rogue’s innovative Divide-n-Hide cargo system is also available once again, as is a powered opening/closing and Motion Activated Liftgate that allows access merely by kicking one’s foot under the rear bumper.

The 2021 Rogue is once again available in three trims, starting with the base S that’s followed by SV and Platinum models. Deliveries will begin this fall, with pricing expected closer to the model’s launch.

2021 Nissan Rogue
Cargo capacity has always been a Rogue strongpoint.

As intriguing as the new 2021 Rogue might appear, some would rather benefit from the steep discounts currently being offered by Nissan Canada and its dealer organization. In fact, a quick check of our 2020 Nissan Rogue Canada Prices page showed up to $5,000 in additional incentives at the time of writing, which is a staggering savings for an SUV in this price class. To learn about all the available manufacturer rebates, financing and leasing opportunities, and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands on any new model, find out how a CarCostCanada membership will put money back in your wallet, and while you’re at it make sure to download our free mobile app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Nissan

CarCostCanada

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD Road Test

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The Rogue has maintained its styling since its 2017 mid-cycle makeover, but it still looks good. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

It’s déjà vu all over again, or at least that’s how I felt when picking up my 2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum AWD tester. I’d spent a week with an identical model less than a year prior; even down to its top-line trim level and most popular Pearl White paint. 

Then I got inside, however, and was reminded of a near identical model I test drove the year prior in lovely Scarlet Ember livery, and therefore also remembered that last year’s SL Platinum wasn’t fully loaded, missing this SUV’s $500 SL Platinum Reserve Interior Package that includes a stylish stitched leatherette dash pad and replaces the regular Charcoal black or Almond beige leather upholstery with special quilted leather in an even richer looking Premium Tan hue, which comes across more like caramel or saddle brown. Either way it looks great, and ideally complements the white exterior paint, although the upgrade package is no longer available with the special metallic red exterior paint, or for that matter Nissan’s beautiful Caspian Blue. A shame. 

Not to start this review out on a negative, because there’s very little to fault this popular compact crossover SUV on. As noted, the Rogue is Nissan Canada’s most popular model, and one look should make it easy to understand why. It was refreshed for the 2017 model year with Nissan’s wider, more U-shaped Vmotion 2.0 grille that I happen to like a lot more than the original V, while its then-new quad-beam headlamps with LED daytime running lights, and its updated LED brake lights added premium-level sophistication to the design. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Looking right at home in nature, the little crossover SUV makes a good companion for summer camping trips and winter getaways. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

That face-lifted 2017 model included additional styling tweaks on the outside plus updates within, a personal favourite being its flat-bottom steering wheel that still makes a sporty statement in the otherwise elegantly appointed top-line 2019 Rogue SL Platinum Reserve model. So equipped, that steering wheel is leather-wrapped with a heatable rim, a much appreciated mid-winter feature, as are the Quick Comfort heated front seats that come standard across the entire Rogue line, albeit the Platinum’s perforated leather upholstery is exclusive to this model. 

There’s actually more to the SL Platinum Reserve Interior’s seat design than quilting and the caramel colour change. The quilting is only used for the centre inserts, with perforated leather added to the inner bolsters and contrast-stitched black leather on top of those bolsters for a little more of a sport look mixed in with the luxury. The seats’ upholstery is complemented by the same Premium Tan on the door armrests, centre armrest, padded knee protectors on each side of the lower centre console, and even the aforementioned dash facing, which incorporates a similarly classy looking stitched leatherette pad ahead of the front passenger. 

Icing on the proverbial cake comes in the form of Piano Black interior door inlays surrounding the usual chromed door handles, which match up nicely next to the same glossy black treatment rimming the dash vents, centre console, gear lever surround and otherwise leather-wrapped shift knob. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Large machine-finished 19-inch alloys are exclusive to SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

As you may have guessed, the latest Rogue SL Platinum Reserve doesn’t just look like a premium crossover SUV, but in addition its standard feature set is replete with top-drawer gear that one-ups plenty of luxury brands. For instance, the official name given to this trim level is Rogue SL Platinum with ProPilot Assist, the latter technology standard with all SL Platinum models and really quite impressive. It’s a semi-autonomous “hands-on-wheel” driving system, which means it has the ability to completely drive itself, but due to safety concerns only lets you remove your hands from the steering wheel for about eight seconds at a time—it warns you to put your hands back on the wheel after that. Still, it’ll impress your friends and might be useful to those who find highway driving intimidating, as it helps keep the Rogue centered within its lane and, along with its Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Intelligent Lane Intervention systems, may even help avoid an accident. 

These latter two advanced driver assistance systems get pulled up to the SL Platinum from mid-range SV trim, as does Intelligent emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and adaptive cruise control, while high beam assist, rear parking sensors, Moving Object Detection (MOD), backup collision intervention and rear autonomous emergency braking join ProPilot Assist as options with the SV and standard equipment with the top-line SL Platinum model. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The optional SL Platinum Reserve package replaces the usual black or beige interior colour scheme with this saddle brown motif. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with all the usual active and passive safety features, some advanced tech incorporated into upper trims from the base Rogue S include Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) with a display showing individual tire pressures and an Easy-Fill Tire Alert, Intelligent Forward Collision Warning (FCW), Intelligent Emergency Braking (IEB), plus two features normally relegated to top-line trims, Blind Spot Warning (BSW) with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), while Rear Door Alert is an oddly named albeit very welcome feature that actually warns against leaving something or someone in the back seat unattended after turning off the engine, by remembering that you opened a rear door before setting off on your drive. Now that’s smart. 

As cool as some of this tech is, especially watching the Rogue drive itself, applying hands to said wheel while on the highway, and then winding through some twisting backroads after tooling through town is my usual course of action. As always the Rogue didn’t disappoint, but let me insert a caveat here, I’ve never set my performance expectations too high. This is an SUV built primarily for comfort rather than all-out speed, and to that end it delivers in spades, with a nice compliant ride, smooth, progressive acceleration, and an easy, controlled demeanor on the open freeway. It can manage curves too, and provides strong braking when needed, but if you’re looking for performance there are sportier SUVs in this class, yet few are smoother than the Rogue, such refinement its specialty. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Navigation comes standard in SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Behind that V-motion grille is the Nissan’s dependable 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine, which continues to make a totally acceptable if not breathtaking 170 horsepower and 175 lb-ft of torque, while its standard continuously variable transmission (CVT) is one of the reasons behind that just noted smooth factor. It’s also partially responsible for the Rogue’s commendable Transport Canada fuel economy rating that comes in at 9.6 L/100km in the city, 7.5 on the highway and 8.7 combined with its as-tested all-wheel drivetrain, or 9.1 city, 7.1 highway and 8.2 combined when opting for front-wheel drive. 

As is mostly the case in this class, all-wheel drive is more about tackling slippery pavement than anything off-road, although traveling to campsites over logging roads or light-duty trails can benefit from AWD, as well as its various electronic all-weather features, such as Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) with Traction Control System (TCS). This said others in the class are starting to broaden their appeal, with the latest RAV4 Trail featuring some real 4×4-like go-anywhere technologies, and the Subaru Forester long offering its X-Mode for extracting itself from rougher situations. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Like the majority of Nissans, the Rogue uses a smooth operating CVT for “shifting gears”. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Back to earth, or rather asphalt, the Rogue is ideal for slogging through Canadian winters, hitting the slopes, or alternatively heading out on that summer camping vacation. It can tow a small camp trailer or lightweight boat weighing up to 500 kilos (1,100 lbs), plus it can carry plenty of gear in back, up to 1,112 litres (39.3 cubic feet) in the dedicated cargo area and 1,982 litres (70.0 cubic feet) when its 60/40-split rear seatbacks are folded flat. That rear bench is made more passenger and cargo friendly via a centre pass-through that doubles as a centre armrest with cupholders, which allows longer items like skis to be stuffed down the middle while rear passengers enjoy the benefit of the window seats, although take note they might be grumbling on the way back from the ski hill due to a surprising lack of available rear seat heaters. 

Along with all of the features already mentioned, the $37,398 top-line SL Platinum gets a lot of premium-level upgrades that really make a difference when it comes to performance, safety, convenience and luxury, such as AWD, 19-inch alloy wheels, LED headlamps, an electromechanical parking brake, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a heated leather steering wheel rim and leather-wrapped shift knob, memory for the six-way powered driver’s seat and side mirrors, a four-way powered front passenger’s seat, a powered panoramic sunroof, dual-zone automatic climate control, navigation, a surround parking monitor, great sounding Bose audio with nine speakers including two subs, Radio Data System (RDS) and speed-sensitive volume control, a gesture activated liftgate, and more. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Rear seating and storage is accommodating. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I won’t tire you by scrolling through lists of everything that gets pulled up to SL Platinum trim from the other two grades, but some highlights from both include remote engine start, proximity-sensing access with pushbutton ignition, auto on/off headlights, fog lamps, LED turn signals within the side mirror caps, roof rails, the aforementioned six-way powered driver’s seat with power lumbar, a retractable cargo cover and more with the $29,098 SV, plus variable intermittent wipers, overhead LED map lights and sunglasses storage, a colour multi-information display, a 7.0-inch centre touchscreen, NissanConnect featuring Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, SiriusXM Traffic, hands-free text messaging assistant, Bluetooth, mood lighting, and more with the $26,798 base Rogue S. Incidentally, all pricing was sourced right here on CarCostCanada, where all the trims, packages and individual features are itemized, plus otherwise hard to find rebate info and dealer invoice pricing is provided. 

For the most part our 2019 Rogue SL Platinum Reserve was well equipped, especially when it came to advanced driver assistance systems, plus it provided more than enough performance, a smooth, quiet ride, great fuel economy, and a fairly luxurious and comfortable cabin, while it was extremely accommodating for driver, passengers and cargo. I like the way it looks, especially as my tester was kitted out, which, along with all of the above, is likely why it’s such a strong seller, and also why it’s easy to recommend.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann  

Photo credits: Karen Tuggay